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How can i Access HTTP Cache in a C# class library ?

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Which cache would that be? –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 2 '10 at 21:37
    
Which cache are you talking about? The HTTPCache object? Processor cache, Windows Cache? Please be a little more specific in your question –  GrayWizardx May 2 '10 at 21:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It is recommended that you use System.Web.HttpRuntime.Cache rather than System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Cache, as explained in this article.

Additionally, while the article talks about performance, I've also had issues in the past where HttpContext.Current isn't always available when you'd expect it to be, especially when dealing with asynchronous handlers.

Another thing to note is that if you aren't accessing the cache in the context of an HTTP request, HttpContext won't help you, since there won't be a relevant context for you to access.

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If you mean the ASP.NET cache, then you can use System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Cache.

HttpContext.Current can also be used the access the current request, response, etc.

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System.Web.HttpContext.Current will sometimes be null, depending on the implementation of the class library. –  Dan Esparza Oct 30 '13 at 14:18

You can access the HTTP cache using the System.Web.Caching namespace as detailed in this MSDN article: System.Web.Cache

Once you import the namespace there is a static accessor for the cache which you can reference. As long as the cache has been instantiated prior (by the ASP.NET process, or another initiator) you will have access to the cache, otherwise it will return a NULL reference.

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