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What does the assert keyword in Java do?

What are some real life examples to understand the key role of assertions?

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3  
I wonder where the phrase "real time example" comes from? I see it a lot in questions. It must be some kind of mis-translation that is somewhat popular for some reason. –  Joachim Sauer May 3 '10 at 14:19
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"life" not "live" –  Adrian Mouat May 3 '10 at 14:23
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In real life you almost never see them. Conjecture: If you use assertions you have to think about three states: Assert passes, assert fails, assert is turned off, instead of just two. And assert is turned off by default so that is the most likely state, and it is hard to ensure that it is enabled for your code. What that adds up to is that asserts are a premature optimization that would be of limited use. As you see in @Bjorn's answer, it is even hard to come up with a use case where you would not want to fail an assert all the time. –  Yishai May 3 '10 at 14:33
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@Yishai: "In real life you almost never see them". These must be the kind of people we do NOT hire. "you have to think about ... assert is turned off" If you need to do that, you are doing it wrong. "asserts are a premature optimization of limited use" This is pretty much off the rails. Here is Sun's take on this: "Using Assertions in Java Technology" and this is also good to read: "The benefits of programming with assertions (a.k.a. assert statements)" –  David Tonhofer Jan 23 '14 at 13:41
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A reference, FWIW: The relationship between software assertions and code quality: "We also compare the efficacy of assertions against that of popular bug finding techniques like source code static analysis tools. We observe from our case study that with an increase in the assertion density in a file there is a statistically significant decrease in fault density." –  David Tonhofer Jan 24 '14 at 1:10

10 Answers 10

up vote 167 down vote accepted

Assertions (by way of the assert keyword) were added in Java 1.4. They are used to verify the correctness of an invariant in the code. They should never be triggered in production code, and are indicative of a bug or misuse of a code path. They can be activated at run-time by way of the -ea option on the java command, but are not turned on by default.

An example:

public Foo acquireFoo(int id) {
  Foo result = null;
  if (id > 50) {
    result = fooService.read(id);
  } else {
    result = new Foo(id);
  }
  assert result != null;

  return result;
}
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17  
In fact, Oracle tells you not to use assert to check public method parameters (docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/guide/lang/assert.html). That should throw an Exception instead of killing the program. –  SJuan76 Aug 25 '13 at 21:58
    
Good point, updated to reflect solely the invariant use-case. –  Ophidian Aug 26 '13 at 14:13
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This is a correct description of how to use assertions, but it doesn't explain what they are for. See my answer below for more details. –  TwoThe Oct 17 '13 at 13:04

Let's assume that you are supposed to write a program to control a nuclear power-plant. It is pretty obvious that even the most minor mistake could have catastrophic results, therefore your code has to be bug-free (assuming that the JVM is bug-free for the sake of the argument).

Java is not a verifiable language, which means: you cannot calculate that the result of your operation will be perfect. The main reason for this are pointers: they can point anywhere or nowhere, therefore they cannot be calculated to be of this exact value, at least not within a reasonable span of code. Given this problem, there is no way to prove that your code is correct at a whole. But what you can do is to prove that you at least find every bug when it happens.

This idea is based on the Design-by-Contract (DbC) paradigm: you first define (with mathematically precision) what your method is supposed to do, and then verify this by testing it during actual execution. Example:

// Calculates the sum of a (int) + b (int) and returns the result (int).
int sum(int a, int b) {
  return a + b;
}

While this is pretty obvious to work fine, most programmers will not see the hidden bug inside this one (hint: the Ariane V crashed because of a similar bug). Now the DbC defines that you must always check the input and output of a function to verify that it did work correct. Java can do this through assertions:

// Calculates the sum of a (int) + b (int) and returns the result (int).
int sum(int a, int b) {
    assert (Integer.MAX_VALUE - a >= b) : "Value of " + a + " + " + b + " is too large to add.";
  final int result = a + b;
    assert (result - a == b) : "Sum of " + a + " + " + b + " returned wrong sum " + result;
  return result;
}

Should this function now ever fail, you will notice it. You will know that there is a problem in your code, you know where it is and you know what caused it (similar to Exceptions). And what is even more important: you stop executing right when it happens to prevent any further code to work with wrong values and potentially cause damage to whatever it controls.

Java Exceptions are a similar concept, but they fail to verify everything. If you want even more checks (at the cost of execution speed) you need to use assertions. Doing so will bloat your code, but you can in the end deliver a product at a surprisingly short development time (the earlier you fix a bug, the lower the cost). And in addition: if there is any bug inside your code, you will detect it. There is no way of a bug slipping-through and cause issues later.

This still is not a guarantee for bug-free code, but it is much closer to that, than usual programs.

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I chose this example because it presents hidden bugs in seemingly bug-free code very well . If this is similar to what someone else presented, then they maybe had the same idea in mind. ;) –  TwoThe Nov 4 '13 at 10:58
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Your comment contains so much wrong stuff, I wouldn't even know where to start. One thing for you to think about: take an empty main method, the code is very easy to verify. In all programming languages that I know. –  TwoThe Dec 9 '13 at 16:09
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You choose assert because it fails when the assertion is false. An if can have any behaviour. Hitting fringe cases is the job of Unit Testing. Using Design by Contract specified the contract rather well but as with real life contracts, you need a control to be sure they are respected. With assertions a watchdog is inserted that will then you when the contract is disrespected. Think of it as a nagging lawyer screaming "WRONG" every time you do something that is outside or against a contract you signed and then send you home so you can't continue to work and breach the contract further! –  Eric Tobias Dec 19 '13 at 11:12
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@TwoThe outside the topic of assertion, is the second assert really necessary? Haha I cant think of a scenario where it would return the wrong result. –  SuperDeluxeProCodeMeister Dec 21 '13 at 15:31
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Necessary in this simple case: no, but the DbC defines that every result must be checked. Imagine someone now modifies that function to something much more complex, then he has to adapt the post-check as well, and then it suddenly becomes useful. –  TwoThe Dec 23 '13 at 12:24

A "real world example", from a Stack-class (from Assertion in Java Articles)

public int pop() {
   // precondition
   assert !isEmpty() : "Stack is empty";
   return stack[--num];
}
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59  
This would be frowned upon in C: An assertion is something that REALLY NEVER should happen - popping an empty stack should throw a NoElementsException or something along the lines. See Donal's reply. –  Konerak May 3 '10 at 13:35
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I agree. Even though this is taken from an official tutorial, it's a bad example. –  DJClayworth May 3 '10 at 16:48
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There's probably a memory leak there. You should set stack[num] = null; in order for the GC to do its job properly. –  hajder Apr 8 '14 at 20:26
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I think in a private method, it would be correct to use an assertion, as it would be weird to have exceptions for a malfunction of a class or method. In a public method, calling it from somewhere outside, you can't really tell how the other code uses it. Does it really check isEmpty() or not? You don't know. –  Vlasec Aug 5 '14 at 11:41

Assertions are used to check post-conditions and "should never fail" pre-conditions. Correct code should never fail an assertion; when they trigger, they should indicate a bug (hopefully at a place that is close to where the actual locus of the problem is).

An example of an assertion might be to check that a particular group of methods is called in the right order (e.g., that hasNext() is called before next() in an Iterator).

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You don't have to call hasNext() before next(). –  DJClayworth May 3 '10 at 16:49
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@DJClayworth: You don't need to avoid triggering assertions either. :-) –  Donal Fellows May 3 '10 at 16:52

I once wrote a method that compared two arbitrary values for equality, where either value could be null:

/**
 * Compare two values using equals(), after checking for null.
 * @param thisValue (may be null)
 * @param otherValue (may be null)
 * @return True if they are both null or if equals() returns true
 */
public static boolean compare(final Object thisValue, final Object otherValue) {
  boolean result;
  if (thisValue == null) {
    result = otherValue == null;
  } else {
    result = thisValue.equals(otherValue);
  }
  return result;
}

This code delegates the work of the equals() method in the case where thisValue is not null. But it assumes the equals() method correctly fulfills the contract of equals() by properly handling a null parameter.

A colleague objected to my code, telling me that many of our classes have buggy equals() methods that don't test for null, so I should put that check into this method. It's debatable if this is wise, or if we should force the error, so we can spot it and fix it, but I deferred to my colleague and put in a null check, which I've marked with a comment:

public static boolean compare(final Object thisValue, final Object otherValue) {
  boolean result;
  if (thisValue == null) {
    result = otherValue == null;
  } else {
    result = otherValue != null && thisValue.equals(otherValue); // null check
  }
  return result;
}

The additional check here, other != null, is only necessary if the equals() method fails to check for null as required by its contract.

Rather than engage in a fruitless debate with my colleague about the wisdom of letting the buggy code stay in our code base, I simply put two assertions in the code. These assertions will let me know, during the development phase, if one of our classes fails to implement equals() properly, so I can fix it:

public static boolean compare(final Object thisValue, final Object otherValue) {
  boolean result;
  if (thisValue == null) {
    result = otherValue == null;
    assert otherValue == null || otherValue.equals(null) == false;
  } else {
    result = otherValue != null && thisValue.equals(otherValue);
    assert thisValue.equals(null) == false;
  }
  return result;
}

The important points to keep in mind are these:

  1. Assertions are development-phase tools only.

  2. The point of an assertion is to let you know if there's a bug, nut just in your code, but in your code base. (The assertions here will actually flag bugs in other classes.)

  3. Even if my colleague was confident that our classes were properly written, the assertions here would still be useful. New classes will be added that might fail to test for null, and this method can flag those bugs for us.

  4. In development, you should always turn assertions on, even if the code you've written doesn't use assertions. My IDE is set to always do this by default for any new executable.

  5. The assertions don't change the behavior of the code in production, so my colleague is happy that the null check is there, and that this method will execute properly even if the equals() method is buggy. I'm happy because I will catch any buggy equals() method in development.

Also, you should test your assertion policy by putting in a temporary assertion that will fail, so you can be certain that you are notified, either through the log file or a stack trace in the output stream.

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Here's the most common use case. Suppose you're switching on an enum value:

switch (fruit) {
  case apple:
    // do something
    break;
  case pear:
    // do something
    break;
  case banana:
    // do something
    break;
}

As long as you handle every case, you're fine. But someday, somebody will add fig to your enum and forget to add it to your switch statement. This produces a bug that may get tricky to catch, because the effects won't be felt until after you've left the switch statement. But if you write your switch like this, you can catch it immediately:

switch (fruit) {
  case apple:
    // do something
    break;
  case pear:
    // do something
    break;
  case banana:
    // do something
    break;
  default:
    assert false : "Missing enum value: " + fruit;
}
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2  
That's why you should have warnings enabled and warnings treated as errors. Any halfway decent compiler is capable of telling you, if only you allow it to tell you, that you are missing an enum check, and it will do so at compile time, which is unspeakably better than (perhaps, one day) finding out at run time. –  Mike Nakis Sep 23 '14 at 15:43

Assertion basically used to debug the application or it is used in replacement to exception handling to some application to check the validity of an application. Assertion works on run time. A simple example can that explain the whole concept very simply is herein -Wiki Answers

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basically "assert true" will pass and "assert false" will fail lets looks how this will work

 public static void main(String[] args)
    {
       String s1 = "Hello";
       assert checkInteger(s1);
    }

    private static boolean checkInteger(String s)
    {
      try{
           Integer.parseInt(s);
           return true;
         }
       catch(Exception e)
        {
           return false;
        }
    }
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Assert is very useful when developing. You use it when something just cannot happen if your code is working correctly. It's easy to use, and can stay in the code for ever, because it will be turned off in real life.

If there is any chance that the condition can occur in real life, then you must handle it.

I love it, but don't know how to turn it on in Eclipse/Android/ADT . It seems to be off even when debugging. (There is a thread on this, but it refers to the 'Java vm', which does not appear in the ADT Run Configuration).

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Assertions is keyword. It is introduced in jdk 1.4 .In assertions we r using 2 types. 1. Very simple assert statements 2.simple assert statements. By default all assert statements will not be executing... If assert statements recieve false then it will raise assertion error automatically..

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protected by Praveen Apr 30 '13 at 9:08

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