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I wan't to change the background color of a div dynamicly using the following HTML, CSS and javascript. HTML:

<div id="menu">
    <div class="menuItem"><a href=#>Bla</a></div>
    <div class="menuItem"><a href=#>Bla</a></div>
    <div class="menuItem"><a href=#>Bla</a></div>
</div>

CSS:

.menuItem{
  display:inline;
  height:30px;
  width:100px;
  background-color:#000;

Javascript:

$('.menuItem').hover( function(){
     $(this).css('background-color', '#F00');
},
function(){
     $(this).css('background-color', '#000');
});

Can anyone help me?

Thanks!

EDIT: Thank you very much guys. I forgot to say that I had reasons not to want to use the css way.

And I indeed forgot to check if the DOM was loaded.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Your code looks fine to me.

Make sure the DOM is ready before your javascript is executed by using jQuery's $(callback) function:

$(function() {
   $('.menuItem').hover( function(){
      $(this).css('background-color', '#F00');
   },
   function(){
      $(this).css('background-color', '#000');
   });
});
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As mentioned in this answer, I think timing was all you were missing. –  Timothy Khouri Nov 9 '08 at 13:29
    
Yep, I simply forgot to run the code after the DOM would have finished loading. –  Pim Jager Nov 10 '08 at 15:06
    
+1 very straightforward solution –  orange80 Aug 11 '11 at 23:02
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I would suggest not to use JavaScript for this kind of simple interaction. CSS is capable of doing it (even in Internet Explorer 6) and it will be much more responsive than doing it with JavaScript.

You can use the ":hover" CSS pseudo-class but in order to make it work with Internet Explorer 6, you must use it on an "a" element.

.menuItem
{
    display: inline;
    background-color: #000;

    /* width and height should not work on inline elements */
    /* if this works, your browser is doing the rendering  */
    /* in quirks mode which will not be compatible with    */
    /* other browsers - but this will not work on touch mobile devices like android */

}
.menuItem a:hover 
{
    background-color:#F00;
}
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This can be achieved in CSS using the :hover pseudo-class. (:hover doesn't work on <div>s in IE6)

HTML:

<div id="menu">
   <a class="menuItem" href=#>Bla</a>
   <a class="menuItem" href=#>Bla</a>
   <a class="menuItem" href=#>Bla</a>
</div>

CSS:

.menuItem{
  height:30px;
  width:100px;
  background-color:#000;
}
.menuItem:hover {
  background-color:#F00;
}
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test.html

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
 "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>jQuery Test</title>
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="test.css" />
        <script type="text/javascript" src="jquery.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="test.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="menu">
            <div class="menuItem"><a href=#>Bla</a></div>
            <div class="menuItem"><a href=#>Bla</a></div>
            <div class="menuItem"><a href=#>Bla</a></div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

test.css

.menuItem
{

    display: inline;
    height: 30px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: #000;

}

test.js

$( function(){

    $('.menuItem').hover( function(){

        $(this).css('background-color', '#F00');

    },
    function(){

        $(this).css('background-color', '#000');

    });

});

Works :-)

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Since this is a menu, might as well take it to the next level, and clean up the HTML, and make it more semantic by using a list element:

HTML:

  <ul id="menu">
    <li><a href="#">Bla</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Bla</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Bla</a></li>
  </ul>

CSS:

#menu {
  margin: 0;
}
#menu li {
  float: left;
  list-style: none;
  margin: 0;
}
#menu li a {
  display: block;
  line-height:30px;
  width:100px;
  background-color:#000;
}
#menu li a:hover {
  background-color:#F00;
}
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Just curious...When I do menu systems. I always come across the UL/LI stuff. But when using this method, I had to "un-format" the default settings for UL/LI and then reformat them using my own custom css. Especially with sub & sub/sub menus. When I used div tags as the asker has done, I only needed to write the css I needed to format them, nothing more. Since then, I always wondered how UL/LI related to menus as strictly speaking, menus not lists (more like Navs). But I am not saying you are wrong, just asking why, apart from the fact that it is the "norm", UL/LI method is better than the div? –  Francis Rodgers Jul 8 at 13:27
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On a side note this is more efficient:

$(".menuItem").hover(function(){
    this.style.backgroundColor = "#F00";
}, function() {
    this.style.backgroundColor = "#000";
});
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I prefer foxy's answer because we should never use javascript when existing css properties are made for the job.

Don't forget to add display: block ; in .menuItem, so height and width are taken into account.

edit : for better script/look&feel decoupling, if you ever need to change style through jQuery I'd define an additional css class and use $(...).addClass("myclass") and $(...).removeClass("myclass")

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I agree with the vincents. Vincents's in the house ! –  Kent Fredric Nov 9 '08 at 14:19
    
If you're only changing the background colour then there is no need to do a class change - changing classes causes the browser to have to recalculate positioning of elements. –  Sugendran Nov 9 '08 at 21:49
    
Interesting remark about repositioning calculation, I'll think about it next time. –  vincent Nov 9 '08 at 21:52
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If someone reads the original question to mean that they want to dynamically change the hover css and not just change the base css rule for the element, I've found this to work:

I have a dynamically loaded page that requires me to find out how high the container becomes after data is loaded. Once loaded, I want to change the hover effect of the css so that an element covers the resulting container. I need to change the css .daymark:hover rule to have a new height. This is how...

function changeAttr(attrName,changeThis,toThis){
    var mysheet=document.styleSheets[1], targetrule;
    var myrules=mysheet.cssRules? mysheet.cssRules: mysheet.rules;

    for (i=0; i<myrules.length; i++){
        if(myrules[i].selectorText.toLowerCase()==".daymark:hover"){ //find "a:hover" rule
            targetrule=myrules[i];
            break;
        }
    }
    switch(changeThis)
    {
        case "height":
            targetrule.style.height=toThis+"px";
            break;
        case "width":
            targetrule.style.width=toThis+"px";
            break;
    }

}
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I just coded up an example in jQuery on how to create div overlays over radio buttons to create a compact, interactive but simple color selector plug-in for jQuery

http://blarnee.com/wp/jquery-colour-selector-plug-in-with-support-for-graceful-degradation/

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Always keep things easy and simple by creating a class

.bcolor{ background:#F00; }

THEN USE THE addClass() & removeClass() to finish it up

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