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I have the string

a.b.c.d

I want to count the occurrences of '.' in an idiomatic way, preferably a one-liner.

(Previously I had expressed this constraint as "without a loop", in case you're wondering why everyone's trying to answer without using a loop).

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1  
why the loop aversion? –  Blair Conrad Nov 9 '08 at 16:02
    
Homework? Because otherwise I don't see the requirement to avoid the loop. –  PhiLho Nov 9 '08 at 16:13
11  
Not averse to a loop so much as looking for an idiomatic one-liner. –  Bart Nov 17 '08 at 14:28

28 Answers 28

up vote 230 down vote accepted

My 'idiomatic one-liner' for this is:

int count = StringUtils.countMatches("a.b.c.d", ".");

Why write it yourself when it's already in commons lang?

Spring Framework's oneliner for this is:

int occurance = StringUtils.countOccurrencesOf("a.b.c.d", ".");
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2  
I think this is the best solution if you don't want to see a lopp :-) –  robob Apr 20 '11 at 12:50
    
Android one liner that isn't a loop kthnxbai –  Blundell Jun 7 '12 at 12:38
19  
+1 I love it when people actually answer the question the OP asked rather than the question they think the OP should have asked –  demongolem Jun 8 '12 at 0:22
    
7  
Guava equivalent: int count = CharMatcher.is('.').countIn("a.b.c.d"); ...As answered by dogbane in a duplicate question. –  Jonik Aug 12 '13 at 17:00

How about this. It doesn't use regexp underneath so should be faster than some of the other solutions and won't use a loop.

int count = line.length() - line.replace(".", "").length();
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20  
Easiest way. Clever one. And it works on Android, where there is no StringUtils class –  Jose_GD Nov 6 '12 at 13:12
7  
This is brilliant ! –  RRTW Jan 23 '13 at 5:01
5  
This is the best one. Should be voted the highest. –  CodeMed Feb 28 '13 at 4:24
9  
This is the best answer. The reason it is the best is because you don't have to import another library. –  Alex Spencer Jul 9 '13 at 20:03
3  
Very practical but ugly as hell. I don't recommend it as it leads to confusing code. –  Daniel San Mar 25 at 22:54

Sooner or later, something has to loop. It's far simpler for you to write the (very simple) loop than to use something like split which is much more powerful than you need.

By all means encapsulate the loop in a separate method, e.g.

public static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle)
{
    int count = 0;
    for (int i=0; i < haystack.length(); i++)
    {
        if (haystack.charAt(i) == needle)
        {
             count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
}

Then you don't need have the loop in your main code - but the loop has to be there somewhere.

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3  
Sounds like a homework question to me. Still, +1 for being the voice of reason. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 9 '08 at 14:49
5  
@Chris, are you one working on a PC from the 80-ies that you're worried about such things? –  Bart Kiers Nov 29 '09 at 14:01
2  
And indeed any Java JIT compiler worth its salt will be able to perform the relevant optimisation. Micro-optimising at the expense of readability is not a good idea. –  Jon Skeet Nov 29 '09 at 14:48
6  
(I'm not even sure where the "stack" bit of the comment comes from. It's not like this answer is my recursive one, which is indeed nasty to the stack.) –  Jon Skeet Nov 29 '09 at 14:51
2  
But please keep in mind that this is okay for searching chars in a String, but certainly not for String patterns in Strings. Then you should use Knuth-Morris' algorithms or others. –  bluewhile Aug 24 '13 at 14:31

I had an idea similar to Mladen, but the opposite...

String s = "a.b.c.d";
int charCount = s.replaceAll("[^.]", "").length();
println(charCount);
share|improve this answer
    
Correct. ReplaceAll(".") would replace any character, not just dot. ReplaceAll("\\.") would have worked. Your solution is more straightforward. –  VonC Nov 9 '08 at 16:20
    
jjnguy had actually suggested a replaceAll("[^.]") first, upon seeing my "a.b.c.d".split("\\.").length-1 solution. But after being hit 5 times, I deleted my answer (and his comment). –  VonC Nov 9 '08 at 16:24
    
"...now you have two problems" (oblig.) Anyway, I'd bet that there are tens of loops executing in replaceAll() and length(). Well, if it's not visible, it doesn't exist ;o) –  Piskvor Aug 25 '10 at 11:22
2  
i don't think it's a good idea to use regex and create a new string for the counting. i would just create a static method that loop every character in the string to count the number. –  mingfai Apr 23 '11 at 23:14
1  
@mingfai: indeed, but the original question is about making a one-liner, and even, without a loop (you can do a loop in one line, but it will be ugly!). Question the question, not the answer... :-) –  PhiLho Apr 26 '11 at 17:25
String s = "a.b.c.d";
int charCount = s.length() - s.replaceAll("\\.", "").length();

ReplaceAll(".") would replace all characters.

PhiLho's solution uses ReplaceAll("[^.]",""), which does not need to be escaped, since [.] represents the character 'dot', not 'any character'.

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I like this one. –  jjnguy Nov 9 '08 at 15:09
    
I like this one. There's still a loop there, of course, as there has to be. –  Paul Nov 9 '08 at 15:13
    
This one is easy to understand. –  Ben Page Nov 9 '08 at 15:38
    
Untested, eh? :-) –  PhiLho Nov 9 '08 at 16:14
1  
well i wrote it in c# :) i'm not a java guy. but it's the principle that counts right? :)) –  Mladen Prajdic Nov 9 '08 at 16:31

A shorter example is

String text = "a.b.c.d";
int count = text.split("\\.",-1).length-1;
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here is a solution without a loop:

public static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle, int i){
    return ((i=haystack.indexOf(needle, i)) == -1)?0:1+countOccurrences(haystack, needle, i+1);}


System.out.println("num of dots is "+countOccurrences("a.b.c.d",'.',0));

well, there is a loop, but it is invisible :-)

-- Yonatan

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2  
Unless your string is so long you get an OutOfMemoryError. –  Spencer Kormos Nov 9 '08 at 15:50
    
The problem sounds contrived enough to be homework, and if so, this recursion is probably the answer you're being asked to find. –  erickson Nov 9 '08 at 17:43
    
That uses indexOf, which will loop... but a nice idea. Posting a truly "just recursive" solution in a minute... –  Jon Skeet Nov 9 '08 at 18:03
1  
LOL, so unnecessary. –  Bernard Feb 16 '11 at 17:04
    
If it has more occurrences that your available stack slots, you will have a stack overflow exception ;) –  Luke Jun 2 at 16:19

Inspired by Jon Skeet, a non-loop version that wont blow your stack. Also useful starting point if you want to use the fork-join framework.

public static int countOccurrences(CharSequeunce haystack, char needle) {
    return countOccurrences(haystack, needle, 0, haystack.length);
}

// Alternatively String.substring/subsequence use to be relatively efficient
//   on most Java library implementations, but isn't any more [2013].
private static int countOccurrences(
    CharSequence haystack, char needle, int start, int end
) {
    if (start == end) {
        return 0;
    } else if (start+1 == end) {
        return haystack.charAt(start) == needle ? 1 : 0;
    } else {
        int mid = (end+start)>>>1; // Watch for integer overflow...
        return
            countOccurrences(haystack, needle, start, mid) +
            countOccurrences(haystack, needle, mid, end);
    }
}

(Disclaimer: Not tested, not compiled, not sensible.)

Perhaps the best (single-threaded, no surrogate-pair support) way to write it:

public static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle) {
    int count = 0;
    for (char c : haystack.toCharArray()) {
        if (c == needle) {
           ++count;
        }
    }
    return count;
}
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My 'idiomatic one-liner' solution:

int count = "a.b.c.d".length() - "a.b.c.d".replace(".", "").length();

Have no idea why a solution that uses StringUtils is accepted.

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There is an older solution similar to this one in this post. –  JCalcines Feb 5 at 9:24

Okay, inspired my Monatan's solution, here's one which is purely recursive - the only library methods used are length() and charAt(), neither of which do any looping:

public static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle)
{
    return countOccurrences(haystack, needle, 0);
}

private static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle, int index)
{
    if (index >= haystack.length())
    {
        return 0;
    }

    int contribution = haystack.charAt(index) == needle ? 1 : 0;
    return contribution + countOccurrences(haystack, needle, index+1);
}

Whether recursion counts as looping depends on which exact definition you use, but it's probably as close as you'll get.

I don't know whether most JVMs do tail-recursion these days... if not you'll get the eponymous stack overflow for suitably long strings, of course.

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No, tail recursion will probably be in Java 7, but it's not widespread yet. This simple, direct tail recursion could be translated to a loop at compile time, but the Java 7 stuff is actually built-in to the JVM to handle chaining through different methods. –  erickson Nov 10 '08 at 20:11
2  
You'd be more likely to get tail recursion if your method returned a call to itself (including a running total parameter), rather than returning the result of performing an addition. –  Stephen Denne Mar 20 '09 at 10:56

Not sure about the efficiency of this, but it's the shortest code I could write without bringing in 3rd party libs:

public static int numberOf(String target, String content)
{
    return (content.split(target).length - 1);
}
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2  
To also count occurences at the end of the string you will have to call split with a negative limit argument like this: return (content.split(target, -1).length - 1);. By default occurences at the end of the string are omitted in the Array resulting from split(). See the Doku –  vlz May 4 at 12:08

In case you're using Spring framework, you might also use "StringUtils" class. The method would be "countOccurrencesOf".

Kind regards,

Fran.

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I don't like the idea of allocating a new string for this purpose. And as the string already has a char array in the back where it stores it's value, String.charAt() is practically free.

for(int i=0;i<s.length();num+=(s.charAt(i++)==delim?1:0))

does the trick, without additional allocations that need collection, in 1 line or less, with only J2SE.

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Giving some love for this one because it is the only one doing a single pass over the string. I DO care about performance . –  javadba Jan 22 at 20:19
    
Why does this answer has so few votes? Seems to be the best to me. –  Pascal May 26 at 11:18
    
charAt iterates through 16 bit code points not characters! A char in Java is not a character. So this answer implies that there must be no Unicode symbol with a high surrogate being equal to the code point of delim. I am not sure if it is correct for the dot, but in general it might be not correct. –  ceving Jul 22 at 17:25

Complete sample:

public class CharacterCounter
{

  public static int countOccurrences(String find, String string)
  {
    int count = 0;
    int indexOf = 0;

    while (indexOf > -1)
    {
      indexOf = string.indexOf(find, indexOf + 1);
      if (indexOf > -1)
        count++;
    }

    return count;
  }
}

Call:

int occurrences = CharacterCounter.countOccurrences("l", "Hello World.");
System.out.println(occurrences); // 3
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wrong code its not working when i try int occurrences = CharacterCounter.countOccurrences("1", "101"); System.out.println(occurrences); // 1 –  jayesh Jan 20 at 6:32
import java.util.Scanner;

class apples {

    public static void main(String args[]) {    
        Scanner bucky = new Scanner(System.in);
        String hello = bucky.nextLine();
        int charCount = hello.length() - hello.replaceAll("e", "").length();
        System.out.println(charCount);
    }
}//      COUNTS NUMBER OF "e" CHAR´s within any string input
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This answer is essentially the same as stackoverflow.com/a/275979/577167 –  Joulukuusi Nov 14 '12 at 23:34
public static int countOccurrences(String container, String content){
    int lastIndex, currIndex = 0, occurrences = 0;
    while(true) {
        lastIndex = container.indexOf(content, currIndex);
        if(lastIndex == -1) {
            break;
        }
        currIndex = lastIndex + content.length();
        occurrences++;
    }
    return occurrences;
}
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The following source code will give you no.of occurrences of a given string in a word entered by user :-

import java.util.Scanner;

public class CountingOccurences {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Scanner inp= new Scanner(System.in);
        String str;
        char ch;
        int count=0;

        System.out.println("Enter the string:");
        str=inp.nextLine();

        while(str.length()>0)
        {
            ch=str.charAt(0);
            int i=0;

            while(str.charAt(i)==ch)
            {
                count =count+i;
                i++;
            }

            str.substring(count);
            System.out.println(ch);
            System.out.println(count);
        }

    }
}
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While methods can hide it, there is no way to count without a loop (or recursion). You want to use a char[] for performance reasons though.

public static int count( final String s, final char c ) {
  final char[] chars = s.toCharArray();
  int count = 0;
  for(int i=0; i<chars.length; i++) {
    if (chars[i] == c) {
      count++;
    }
  }
  return count;
}

Using replaceAll (that is RE) does not sound like the best way to go.

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Somewhere in the code, something has to loop. The only way around this is a complete unrolling of the loop:

int numDots = 0;
if (s.charAt(0) == '.') {
    numDots++;
}

if (s.charAt(1) == '.') {
    numDots++;
}


if (s.charAt(2) == '.') {
    numDots++;
}

...etc, but then you're the one doing the loop, manually, in the source editor - instead of the computer that will run it. See the pseudocode:

create a project
position = 0
while (not end of string) {
    write check for character at position "position" (see above)
}
write code to output variable "numDots"
compile program
hand in homework
do not think of the loop that your "if"s may have been optimized and compiled to
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Here is a slightly different style recursion solution:

public static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle)
{
    return countOccurrences(haystack, needle, 0);
}

private static int countOccurrences(String haystack, char needle, int accumulator)
{
    if (haystack.length() == 0) return accumulator;
    return countOccurrences(haystack.substring(1), needle, haystack.charAt(0) == needle ? accumulator + 1 : accumulator);
}
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Why not just split on the character and then get the length of the resulting array. array length will always be number of instances + 1. Right?

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Try this method:

StringTokenizer stOR = new StringTokenizer(someExpression, "||");
int orCount = stOR.countTokens()-1;
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just another solution but i like linq expressions and one-liner

"a.b.c.d".Where(x => x == '.').Count();
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Why are you trying to avoid the loop? I mean you can't count the "numberOf" dots without checking every single character of the string, and if you call any function, somehow it will loop. This is, String.replace should do a loop verifying if the string appears so it can replace every single occurrence.

If you're trying to reduce resource usage, you won't do it like that because you're creating a new String just for counting the dots.

Now if we talk about the recursive "enter code here" method, someone said that it will fail due to an OutOfMemmoryException, I think he forgot StackOverflowException.

So my method would be like this (I know it is like the others but, this problem requires the loop):

public static int numberOf(String str,int c) {
    int res=0;
    if(str==null)
        return res;
    for(int i=0;i<str.length();i++)
        if(c==str.charAt(i))
            res++;
    return res;
}
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int count = (line.length() - line.replace("str", "").length())/"str".length();
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With you could also use streams to achieve this. Obviously there is an iteration behind the scenes, but you don't have to write it explicitly!

public static long countOccurences(String s, char c){
    return s.chars().filter(ch -> ch == c).count();
}

countOccurences("a.b.c.d", '.'); //3
countOccurences("hello world", 'l'); //3
share|improve this answer
    
Using .codePoints() instead of .chars() would then support any Unicode value (including those requiring surrogate pairs) –  Luke Usherwood Aug 14 at 14:40
 public static int countSubstring(String subStr, String str) {

    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
        if (str.substring(i).startsWith(subStr)) {
            count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
}
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What about below recursive algo.Which is also linear time.

import java.lang.*;
import java.util.*;

class longestSubstr{

public static void main(String[] args){
   String s="ABDEFGABEF";


   int ans=calc(s);

   System.out.println("Max nonrepeating seq= "+ans);

}

public static int calc(String s)
{//s.s
      int n=s.length();
      int max=1;
      if(n==1)
          return 1;
      if(n==2)
      {
          if(s.charAt(0)==s.charAt(1)) return 1;
          else return 2;


      }
      String s1=s;
    String a=s.charAt(n-1)+"";
          s1=s1.replace(a,"");
         // System.out.println(s+" "+(n-2)+" "+s.substring(0,n-1));
         max=Math.max(calc(s.substring(0,n-1)),(calc(s1)+1));


return max;
}


}


</i>
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