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I am going through some exam questions for the 70-536 exam and an actual question one developer posted on his blog has popped up in my exam questions. I cannot remember what his answer was .... but below is the question:

You need to write a multicast delegate that accepts a DateTime argument and returns a bool value. Which code segment should you use?

A: public delegate int PowerDeviceOn(bool, DateTime)

B: public delegate bool PowerDeviceOn(Object, EventArgs)

C: public delegate void PowerDeviceOn(DateTime)

D: public delegate bool PowerDeviceOn(DateTime)

The answer is A.

Can someone please explain why? As I already did some research into this question a while ago and so I was sure that it was C, obviously now looking back at the question its clear that I did not read properly. As i was sure I had seen the same one before so I jumped to the most obvious one.

A variation on this question:

You need to write a multicast delegate that accepts a DateTime argument. Which code segment should you use?

A: public delegate int PowerDeviceOn(bool, DateTime)

B: public delegate bool PowerDeviceOn(Object, EventArgs)

C: public delegate void PowerDeviceOn(DateTime)

D: public delegate bool PowerDeviceOn(DateTime)

Now this is another variation on this question, it still has the same bogus sample answers, as they still kind work in throwing the exam taker off. Notice how by simply keeping the sample answers the same and by removing a small portion of the question text, the answer is C and not A.

The variation has no official answer as I just conjured it up using the exam question as a baseplate. The answer is definitely C. This time round its easy to see why C is correct but the very first question I have an inkling but as you know an inkling is not good enough in passing exams.

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The motivation for this question is because I am of the impression that multicast delegates do not any return data, based upon the simple idea that the delegate will be calling more than one method and each method must have the same method signature. The above question seems to say otherwise, you lot be the judge !!! Answer away :) –  IbrarMumtaz May 3 '10 at 17:08
3  
This is a good example of why I find these certifications to not be very useful. As an employee, I've never had a potential employer indicate they want me to have them or made any comments on the ones I do have. As an employer, certifications have never swayed me on a candidate. They are a waste of time and really only benefit the certification provider. But that's purely my opinion. –  Matt Greer May 3 '10 at 17:18
    
Nicely put Matt. Because the material is not standardised and fecking MS will not publish past papers I can understand the frustration in people trying to revise for their exams as there is no horses mouth to listen to? Why? Because the Horse has been branded by a massive MS steak iron in its back and is awol. You tend to find lots of people providing sample exam questions where the above might be one of them with no clear cut answer and reasoning. Without the horses mouth opinnion, it;s hard to find a group of people that all appreciate the effectiveness and usefulness of the certifications. –  IbrarMumtaz May 4 '10 at 16:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is not a very well worded question. A multicast delegate is when you have combined separate delegates into one:

delegate int Foo();
Foo a = () => 5;
Foo b = () => 9;
Foo c = a + b; // c is a multicast delegate

When you call c, it invokes a, then b. It returns the return value of the last delegate invoked, so the return value for c is 9.

In my opinion, the answer should be

public delegate void PowerDeviceOn(DateTime d, CancelEventArgs e)

And if one of the methods the delegate is pointing to wants to tell you "false", they should set e.Cancel to true. The delegate can't just return a boolean, because then you'd only get the last delegate's answer.

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thanks for this Matt, this helps alot. So i take it Multicast delegates can return something?? if they do it's returns the object associated with the delegate that has a return type? I understand what you mean about the ordering and etc. I was just thinking if multiple delegates have the same return type, is it fair to assume that value being returned by the M.Delegate will be overwritten? Does that make sense? –  IbrarMumtaz May 4 '10 at 15:58
    
The return value is the return value of the last delegate that is called. Like in my example, c was made out of a and then b. So c calls a, it then calls b. Whatever b returns, that is what c returns, because b came last. If it was c = b + a, then whatever a returned would be what c returns. –  Matt Greer May 4 '10 at 16:42

First of all, by definition, all delegate instances in .NET are multicast delegates, even with 0 or 1 actual functions attached to them.

Strictly speaking, the only delegate (multicast being superfluous) that fits the actual description for problem 1 is D. That is the only functions that accepts a DateTime parameter and returns a bool.

In fact, answer A doesn't meet the requirements explicitly or even conceptually. If the bool parameter were a ref parameter, it would at least be capable of returning a boolean value to the calling code. As it stands, you'd have to check that the return value was > 0.

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thats exactly what I thought: "Strictly speaking, the only delegate (multicast being superfluous) that fits the actual description for problem 1 is D. That is the only functions that accepts a DateTime parameter and returns a bool" My only explaination is that bool can easily be translated to 0,1 values given that you can only have true or false values. There is a basic dot-to-dot relationship that can be drawn but still ... a definitive answer for problem one is proving very very very elusive. –  IbrarMumtaz May 3 '10 at 17:16
    
@IbrarMumtaz: If that's truly the wording of the question, then the answer is simply wrong. I find it odd, however, that the exam would ask you to construct a multicast delegate that returns a value at all, since that's considered bad design. –  Adam Robinson May 3 '10 at 17:21
    
That's because problem one is a bogus question. Even if it did mean to indicate that you return 0 or 1, you are still only getting a 0 or 1 from the last method in the chain. –  Matt Greer May 3 '10 at 17:21
    
@ Matt, I know what you mean. I am dead sure the question is bogus as you have already said. Thanks for replying anyways. –  IbrarMumtaz May 4 '10 at 15:56
    
Honestly thought I was going completely bonkers with this one... whatever I'll go with A if it comes up in the exam –  daveL Sep 10 '12 at 17:24

D) public delegate bool PowerDeviceOn(DateTime) is correct

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D is not correct. Please see the approved answer. –  Gene S Oct 10 '12 at 20:50

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