Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to apply a 3px top left & top right radius border.

How can I do this across all browsers (e.g. IE, WebKit, Mozilla)?

And if the browser doesn't support the border-radius attribute, just default to no radius (square corner).

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

border-radius.com is great for this:

-webkit-border-top-left-radius: 3px;
-webkit-border-top-right-radius: 3px;
-moz-border-radius-topleft: 3px;
-moz-border-radius-topright: 3px;
border-top-left-radius: 3px;
border-top-right-radius: 3px;
share|improve this answer
    
what about MSIE? –  sarah May 3 '10 at 17:13
    
check out the link i have posted for msie. –  meo May 3 '10 at 17:16
    
meo's link is good. Jump to this page: smashingmagazine.com/2010/04/28/… as well. There is no straightforward CSS solution for MSIE. :-( –  artlung May 3 '10 at 18:05

If IE ever supports any standards ill eat my hat.

This is the best you can hope for:

-webkit-border-top-left-radius: 3px;
-webkit-border-top-right-radius: 3px;
-moz-border-radius-topleft: 3px;
-moz-border-radius-topright: 3px;
border-top-left-radius: 3px;
border-top-right-radius: 3px;

Edit: my bad, missed the "top left and right only" part, corrected the codez

share|improve this answer
    
IE is the first one in his list, but the only one not covered by your example :P Check the link i have posted –  meo May 3 '10 at 17:11
1  
True, but the OP also said "And if the browser doesn't support the border-radius attribute, just default to no radius" which is what will happen. So the answer is correct. –  Dan Diplo May 3 '10 at 17:12
    
To elaborate, @sarah, this is exactly what you want. IE does not support rounded corners, so it will simply show square ones. WebKit (Safari) and Moz (Firefox et al) do support rounded corners, via the browser-specific CSS (the rules with the prefix). The simple border-radius is used for future-proofing. –  Matt Ball May 3 '10 at 17:14
1  
This applies a border radius to the entire element, not just the topleft & topright –  sarah May 3 '10 at 17:14
    
ok i take my downvote back :P –  meo May 3 '10 at 17:15

check this topic. it should cover all your needs in rounded corners: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2687804/emulating-css3-border-radius-and-box-shadow-in-ie7-8

share|improve this answer
border-top-left-radius:3px;
border-top-right-radius:3px;
-webkit-border-top-right-radius:3px;
-webkit-border-top-left-radius:3px;
-moz-border-radius-topright:3px;
-moz-border-radius-topleft:3px;

This will work in Mozilla and Webkit browsers and anything supporting CSS3 border-radius property. IE = no go. Also, you should note that FF2 will support this but the rounded edge is not very pretty.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.