Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How can I detect the user agent in a web service? My web service is implemented using a WCF webservice with basicHTTPBinding. It will be a post from some SOAP clients. I wish to know the user-agent from the clients.

I shall like to see some sample code for this.

I am using a WCF based web service and in the svc.cs, I tried to catch this.Context.Request.UserAgent. But it gives the following error:

this.Context.Request.UserAgent 'MySoapService.MyService' does not contain a definition for 'Context' and no extension method 'Context' accepting a first argument of type 'MySoapService.MyService' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

I also tried System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request.UserAgent and it says:

'System.Web.HttpContext.Current' is null

Edit note:

I tried to activate the ASP.NET compatibility mode. I added <serviceHostingEnvironment aspNetCompatibilityEnabled="true" /> in the config file and added [AspNetCompatibilityRequirements(RequirementsMode = AspNetCompatibilityRequirementsMode.Required)] on the top of the class that implements the service interface. Then using System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request.UserAgent gives me the user agent as desired.

share|improve this question
    
It will be a post from some SOAP clients. –  Kangkan May 4 '10 at 3:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can read user agent from the HttpContext.Current.Request object if you enable ASP.NET compatibility in web.config:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I shall try. But can you just guide me how to enable ASP.NET compatibility here? –  Kangkan Aug 25 '10 at 9:58
    
I tried using HttpContext.Current.Request and the error that I got was "The name 'HttpContext' does not exist in the current context". I put <serviceHostingEnvironment aspNetCompatibilityEnabled="true" /> in the config file and [AspNetCompatibilityRequirements(RequirementsMode = AspNetCompatibilityRequirementsMode.Required)] on top of the class. But it is not working. –  Kangkan Aug 27 '10 at 9:32
    
I think you can also use OperationContext.Current.RequestContext.RequestMessage.Headers –  tjrobinson Jan 10 '11 at 10:37

There is another way to get the user agent without enabling ASP.NET compatibility in web.config:

string userAgent = WebOperationContext.Current.IncomingRequest.Headers["User-Agent"];
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It will be great if I can do it without using ASP.NET compatibility. –  Kangkan Jul 18 '11 at 5:34

You can use also:

WebOperationContext.Current.IncomingRequest.UserAgent

share|improve this answer

What a totally unhelpful response!

This is not a trivial task. Yes it is obviously possible to get te user-agent string but how does one actually do it? I spent 2 hours checking google and so on but found the answer buried in MSDN documentation. In Visual Studio, from within a WebMethod try

this.Context.Request.UserAgent

That should do it!

share|improve this answer
    
@Mathew: thanks. I shall checkout and reply. –  Kangkan Jul 25 '10 at 15:09
    
@Mathew: I am using a WCF based web service and in the svc.cs, I tried to catch this.Context.Request.UserAgent. But it gives the following error: this.Context.Request.UserAgent 'MySoapService.MyService' does not contain a definition for 'Context' and no extension method 'Context' accepting a first argument of type 'MySoapService.MyService' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) I also tried System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request.UserAgent and it says: 'System.Web.HttpContext.Current' is null –  Kangkan Jul 26 '10 at 6:11
    
your webservice (i.e. "this") should be derived from the base system.web.services.webservice which has the member Context (see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) Did you leave out using system.web.services? –  Matthew Scott Aug 11 '10 at 17:39
    
MSDN also says......XML Web service methods that have either the SoapRpcMethodAttribute or SoapDocumentMethodAttribute attribute applied to them with the OneWay property of set to true, do not have access to their HttpContext using the static Current property. To access the HttpContext, derive the class implementing the XML Web service method from WebService and access the Context property. This could be your issue –  Matthew Scott Aug 23 '10 at 19:38
2  
WCF services don't derive from System.Web.Services. They can be hosted outside of IIS (say, in a Windows Service). Orlangur's answer below is correct. If the service is hosted in IIS, you can enable ASP.NET compatability and then use the HttpContext. –  TheNextman Aug 24 '10 at 14:43

User-Agent is a standard HTTP header. It'll be available to your web service just like it's available to anything CGI-like.

Did you even bother searching for this before posting your question? There must be millions of hits for it on Google.

share|improve this answer
1  
2 -1's and no comments explaining why? If I'm wrong about the HTTP header or this isn't true for a WCF webservice for some reason, say so and let's retag the question and give Kangkan an answer. –  Steve Madsen May 5 '10 at 18:10
    
So, how can I catch the user agent on the server side? My service is on top of a WCF service (SVC). So can I detect the User Agent in the svc.cs page? –  Kangkan May 19 '10 at 9:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.