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given an X, what math is needed to find its Y, using this table?

x->y
0->1
1->0
2->6
3->5
4->4
5->3
6->2

language agnostic problem

and no, i dont/cant just store the array, and do the lookup.

yes, the input will always be the finite set of 0 to 6. it wont be scaling later.

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2  
Is this homework, and does a switch statement count as "just storing the array"? –  Matthew Flaschen May 3 '10 at 20:15
8  
@CrazyJuggler, from what I gather, this is too basic for Math Overflow. –  Matthew Flaschen May 3 '10 at 20:15
7  
@CrazyJugglerDrummer: Are you serious? I just looked there for the first time. Seems like a question such as this would get lost there among the discussions of manifolds, bipartite graphs, etc. –  Bill May 3 '10 at 20:16
7  
@Crazy: Mathoverflow is for graduate math only. I would place this under "middle-school math" –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 3 '10 at 20:19
5  
I was an advanced undergraduate in math, and continued to learn things after graduating. However, any question on Math Overflow that I can understand is tagged "soft-question". –  David Thornley May 3 '10 at 20:22

11 Answers 11

up vote 36 down vote accepted

This:

y = (8 - x) % 7

This is how I arrived at that:

x  8-x  (8-x)%7
----------------
0   8     1
1   7     0
2   6     6
3   5     5
4   4     4
5   3     3
6   2     2
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+1: Nice answer - fewer operations than mine –  Paul R May 3 '10 at 20:21
    
So you are saying that you used common sense and logic to derive an answer to your problem? Who would have thought???? –  ChaosPandion May 3 '10 at 20:22
5  
As for why they are equivalent: in modulus 7, 6 == -1 and 8 == 1, so x*6 + 1 == (-1)x + 1 == (-1)x + 8 –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 3 '10 at 20:23
int f(int x)
{
    return x["I@Velcro"] & 7;
}
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wtf? please explain. –  Kugel May 3 '10 at 22:52
1  
@Kugel: that's a simple lookup table with a bit of C obfuscation. x["I@Velcro"] means the same thing as "I@Velcro"[x] (both means *(x + "I@Velcro")). That is "get the character a position x". Every character has an ascii code and with & 7 you only keep the 3 lower digits... and it works. Some fun. –  kriss May 3 '10 at 23:56
1  
The fun bit was using grep to try to find words I could stick in the string with the correct lowest three bits. –  sigfpe May 4 '10 at 0:56
2  
+1 for getting an actual WTF? and making me laugh. Kugel is learning a lot today, and that's what SO is all about ;-) –  phkahler May 4 '10 at 11:31
    
Haha, based on the WTFs/min principle (osnews.com/story/19266/WTFs_m), this would have to be some of the worst code ever. I like it, though. –  Dan Tao May 4 '10 at 13:39

0.048611x^6 - 0.9625x^5 + 7.340278x^4 - 26.6875x^3 + (45 + 1/9)x^2 - 25.85x + 1

Sometimes the simple ways are best. ;)

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11  
+1 for absurdity –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 3 '10 at 20:29
1  
hh polynomial regression :-)? –  Kugel May 3 '10 at 22:48
10  
@Nathan, I have discovered a truly marvelous proof that these are the precise coefficients. However, this margin is too narrow to contain it. –  Matthew Flaschen May 3 '10 at 22:57
1  
That could be wrapped in a general-purpose polynomial class with an array of coefficients, and a length. There would be an evaluate method and.... –  phkahler May 4 '10 at 13:24
1  
@Nathan - He got this via polynomial interpretation en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpolation –  Justin May 4 '10 at 13:46

It looks like:

y = (x * 6 + 1) % 7

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1  
This is perfect. –  ChaosPandion May 3 '10 at 20:18
1  
+1 this is the purest answer so far, since it doesn't require a conditional statement –  Dave DeLong May 3 '10 at 20:18

I don't really like the % operator since it does division so:

y = (641921 >> (x*3)) & 7;

But then you said something about not using lookup tables so maybe this doesn't work for you :-)

Update: Since you want to actually use this in real code and cryptic numbers are not nice, I can offer this more maintainable variant:

y = (0x2345601 >> (x*4)) & 15;
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1  
+1 Very cute solution. –  Stephen Canon May 3 '10 at 20:56
1  
+1 How did you get this? –  Kugel May 3 '10 at 22:53
1  
@Kugel: hint convert magic number to binary and you may see the light) –  kriss May 3 '10 at 23:59
    
All the values from 0 to 6 can be fit into different positions in just nine bits, like: 000101100. If we could just find the way to translate x into the right index, we could get a formula like 44 >> (x ? ?) & 7... –  Guffa May 4 '10 at 12:59

Though it seems a bunch of correct answers have already appeared, I figured I'd post this just to show another way to have worked it out (they're all basically variations on the same thing):

Well, the underlying pattern is pretty simple:

x y
0 6
1 5
2 4
3 3
4 2 
5 1
6 0

y = 6 - x

Your data just happens to have the y values shifted "down" by two indices (or to have the x values shifted "up").

So you need a function to shift the x value. This should do it:

x = (x + 5) % 7;

Resulting equation:

y = 6 - ((x + 5) % 7);
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+1 for showing your work :) –  Glenn Sandoval May 3 '10 at 20:47
    
Nice. If it was homework, I bet this is the pattern that you were supposed to see. :) –  Guffa May 3 '10 at 20:52

Combining the ideas in Dave and Paul's answer gives the rather elegant:

y = (8 - x) % 7`

(though I see I was beaten to the punch with this)

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unsigned short convertNumber(unsigned short input) {
  if (input <= 1) { return !input; } //convert 0 => 1, 1 => 0
  return (8-input); //convert 2 => 6 ... 6 => 2
}
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very practical approach –  Kugel May 3 '10 at 22:50

Homework?

How about:

y = (x <= 1 ? 1 : 8) - x
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and no, i dont/cant just store the array, and do the lookup.

Why not?

yes, the input will always be the finite set of 0 to 6. it wont be scaling later.

Just use a bunch of conditionals then.

if (input == 0) return 1;
else if (input == 1) return 0;
else if (input == 2) return 6;
...

Or find a formula if it's easy to see one, and it is here:

if (input == 0) return 1;
else if (input == 1) return 0;
else return 8 - input;

Here's a way to avoid both modulo and conditionals, going from this:

y = (8 - x) % 7

We know that x % y = x - floor(x/y)*y

So we can use y = 8 - x - floor((8 - x) / 7) * 7

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@|V|lad: what's the point removing modulo if you use a div ? –  kriss May 3 '10 at 20:47
    
@kriss: it's mostly a theoretical achievement, but in rare cases you might not even have a modulo function or it might be slower than division. –  IVlad May 3 '10 at 21:37
    
@|V|lad: I just wanted to point out that mod and div are usually the same low level operation modiv at processor level, hence your suggestion is not very much interesting as there is other ways to avoid both % and /. But indeed I know of (poorly designed) languages where you just have +-*/ (never saw mod slower than div). –  kriss May 3 '10 at 23:27

What about some bit-fu ?

You can get the result using only minus, logical operators and shifts.

b = (x >> 2) | ((x >> 1) & 1)
y = ((b << 3)|(b ^ 1)) - x
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