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I'm having some trouble extending Classes in PHP. Have been Googling for a while.

 $a = new A();
 $a->one();

 $a->two();
 // something like this, or...

 class A {
  public $test1;

   public function one() {
    echo "this is A-one";

    $this->two();
    $parent->two();
    $parent->B->two();
    // ...how do i do something like this (prepare it for using in instance $a)?

   }
 }

 class B extends A {
   public $test2;

    public function two($test) {
     echo "this is B-two";

    }
 }

I'm ok at procedural PHP.

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1  
Can you explain exactly what you hope to accomplish when you are all done? It looks like maybe you're trying to accomplish something with inheritance in a way that it was never meant to do.... –  Noah Goodrich May 3 '10 at 21:27
    
hi, thanks. - i would like to access function two() from instance a. - would like $this-> in all classes to refer to instance a. (+ edited the third command) is that a description you can do something with? Thanks, Frank –  Fffff May 3 '10 at 21:31
2  
That's not how inheritance/extends works, Fffff. class B extends A defines a new class type, B, which has all of the features of A but also whatever new things you add to B. It doesn't make A have more things in it. –  Amber May 3 '10 at 21:34
    
what do the extends mean then, in terms of how you access them? –  Fffff May 3 '10 at 21:36
2  
You don't "access" them - you create an object of type B. $b = new B(); and then $b will have both $b->one() and $b->two() because B inherits the one() method from A and also adds a two() method for B objects only. –  Amber May 3 '10 at 21:40
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your examples are fine, but you are showing a little confusion here:

public function one() {
    echo "this is A-one";

    $this->two();
    $parent->two();
    $parent->B->two();
}

what you want is this I think:

class A
{
    function one()
    {
        echo "A is running one\n";
        $this->two();
    }
    function two()
    {
        echo "A is running two\n";
    }

}

class B extends A
{
    function two()
    {
        echo "B is running two\n";
    }
}

Then you want to make an object of type B and call function "one"

$myB = new B();
$b->one();

This will output

A is running one
B is running two

This is an example of polymorphic class behavior. The superclass will know to call the current instance's version of the function "two". This is a standard feature of PHP and most object oriented languages.

Note, that a superclass never knows about subclasses, the only reason you can call the "two" method and have B's version run is because the function "two" was defined in the parent (A) class.

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It can't be done. First off, class A is class B's parent, so using something with parent is right off the list.

There is a number of things that goes for a child class that does not go for a parent class:

  • Class B needs A to be present in order to work
  • Class B can do everything A can plus more
  • Class B has access (as far as it is allowed to access) all data of class A

None of these things is true in reverse, so together they make up the reason why you cannot call a child's function.

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Thanks. So this would mean it's normal practice to create one big parent class with lots of functions that call functions in the other included classes? –  Fffff May 3 '10 at 21:41
    
Um, no, not really. –  Amber May 3 '10 at 21:43
    
not quite... you should try $b = new B(); $b->one(); Maybe the fact that that works is able to explain to you what you misunderstood. –  Jasper May 3 '10 at 21:49
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Have a close read of the Object Inheritance section of the PHP manual. Yes, there's a lot of information in http://us2.php.net/oop, but it may help you think about what you can get out of OOP.

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here's what you can do:

class A{
  public function methodOfA (){
    echo "this is a method of A (and therefore also of B)";
  }
}

class B extends A{
  public function methodOfB (){
    echo "this is a method of B";
    // you can do {$this->methodOfA ()} if you want because all of A is inherited by B
  }
}

$a = new A ();  // $a is an A
$a->methodOfA ();     // this is OK because $a is an A
// can't do {$a->methodOfB ()} because $a is not a B

$b = new B ();  // $b is a B, and it is also an A, because B extends A
$b->methodOfB (); // ok because $b is a B
$b->methodOfA (); // ok becuase $b is an A

Of course, there's much more. There's a good OOP section in the php manual (in artlung's answer).

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