Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I must've killed over an hour on what seems to me like strange behaviour that happens in Firefox, Safari and Chrome. Here is some code:

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Watch me grow scrollbars!</title>
    </head>
    <body onload="resizeCanvas()">
        <canvas id="canvas"></canvas>
    </body>
</html>

<script type="application/javascript">
    function resizeCanvas() {
        var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
        canvas.setAttribute("height", window.innerHeight);
        canvas.setAttribute("width", window.innerWidth);
    }
</script>

Basically, the canvas always seems to maximize 'too much', and the window grows scrollbars on both sides. I've tried using various ways of obtaining the document dimensions, including nesting canvas in a 100% wide & tall absolutely positioned div, as well as extracting the document.documentElement.clientWidth/Height properties.

Just to be sure I'm not going insane, I've placed an image in place of the canvas, and voila, the same code worked perfectly to stretch the image out to document dimensions.

What am I doing wrong here? I'm too tired to understand. Must.. drink.. something.

share|improve this question
    
You probably also need to set the style for body and canvas elements with margin: 0; padding: 0; border-width: 0;. But honestly, my quick test in Firefox still shows scrollbars. –  Zecc May 28 '11 at 18:26
    
Setting display:block for the canvas does the trick I think. –  Perro Azul Dec 24 '12 at 22:48
add comment

3 Answers

If you are looking for a way to extend the canvas to cover the whole page, the best solution I found is to let CSS automatically resize it to 100%, then use the current canvas element size to reset the canvas resolution.
In order to avoid having scrollbars you must also set the canvas CSS position to absolute.

(tested with Chrome 34, Firefox 27, Explorer 11)

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <body onload="resizeCanvas()" style="margin: 0;">
        <canvas id="canvas" style="position: absolute; width: 100%; height: 100%;"></canvas>
    </body>
</html>

<script type="application/javascript">
    function resizeCanvas() {
        var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
        canvas.setAttribute("width", canvas.offsetWidth);
        canvas.setAttribute("height", canvas.offsetHeight);

        // We draw a circle, just to test that it works
        var ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");
        ctx.beginPath();
        ctx.arc(canvas.offsetWidth/2, canvas.offsetHeight/2, canvas.offsetHeight/2,    0, Math.PI*2, true); 
        ctx.closePath();
        ctx.fill();
    }
</script>
share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I haven't found a workaround for the issue (still open to feedback) so for now I have hidden overflow on the parent container element which brought about roughly what I was looking for. Still, it can't be good if it's this inconsistent. Unless I'm missing something..

share|improve this answer
add comment

Well, this works in Firefox 4, but I haven't tried in other browsers because I don't have them in this computer.

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Watch me grow scrollbars!</title>
<style>
body { margin: 0; padding: 0; }
canvas { width: 100%; height: 100%; border: 0; }
</style>
<script type="text/javascript">
    function resizeCanvas() {
        var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas"),
            ctx = canvas.getContext('2d'),
            height = document.body.clientHeight,
            width = document.body.clientWidth;
        canvas.setAttribute("height", height);
        canvas.setAttribute("width", width);
        ctx.fillStyle = 'rgb(128,128,128)';
        ctx.fillRect(10, 10, width-20, height-20);
    }
</script>
    </head>
    <body onload="resizeCanvas()">
        <canvas id="canvas"></canvas>
    </body>
</html>

As for IE7 (which doesn't support canvas anyway), I had to change your script's type attribute from application/javascript to text/javascript to make the code work.

This is why: (quoting keparo on What is the Javascript MIME Type? What belongs in the type attribute of a script tag?)

The MIME type for javascript wasn't standardized for years. It's now officially: "application/javascript".

The real kicker here is that most browsers won't use that attribute anyway, at least not in the case of the script tag. They actually peek inside the packet and determine the type for themselves.

So the bottom line is that the type="text/javascript" doesn't do anything as far as the javascript is concerned, but it's part of the spec for both HTML 4 and XHTML 1.0.

I don't know if this still stands for more recent versions of IE.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.