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which open source business intelligence solution would you recommend?

All I need is to build some cubes and let the end user play with dimensions, filter data, sort, etc, and once it's done being able to export it to excel...

I'd like the solution to be as simple and easy on resources as possible, and also I'd like it to be as much open source as possible, by the way. I've heard that many solutions available do have many restrictions when it comes to there community version.

I'd like to ear your advices and the pros/cons of each alternative, to help me choose the right tool, and if you could point me to some basic demo and tutorial to get started.

thanks a lot

ps: I'm using sql server databases, they aren't huge databases (in general less than a million records) and I doesn't necessarily have to work on "live" data...

ps: some useful links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_intelligence_tools#Open_source_free_products

http://www.manageability.org/blog/stuff/open-source-java-business-intelligence

http://www.jaspersoft.com/jasperanalysis

http://community.pentaho.com/projects/bi_platform/ http://community.pentaho.com/faq/platform_licensing.php

http://www.eclipse.org/birt/phoenix/

http://www.spagoworld.org/xwiki/bin/view/SpagoWorld/

spago demo http://spagobi.eng.it/SpagoBI/servlet/AdapterHTTP?PAGE=LoginPage&NEW_SESSION=TRUE

http://ostatic.com/blog/open-source-business-intelligence-software-on-the-rise

jpalo demo http://www.jpalo.com/en/products/start_products.html

jpalo (user:viewer/viewer) http://www.ten-sw.com:8080/Palo-Pivot/com.tensegrity.wpalo.WPalo/WPalo.html?locale=en_US&theme=blue

http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:vhsqMQXwCUkJ:www.ow2.org/xwiki/bin/download/Activities/EuropeLocalChapterWebinars/ELCWebinarOSBI.pdf+open+source+business+intelligence&hl=en&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESgpJJ2MqaKprJQOF2jX2UXCZQjg_asv8d7EVYtq0Vma-e-tR1tFxS-I0SOW0IhJC5acYc94rkDOrgP1WckCp_vk4qhKqR9y2Klp_u9cL8hlXoKoUpMkpAd5wabu61A4W0y15E5P&sig=AHIEtbRJ5FAI-3YK-qtayPjKkF_CwOgZag

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As far as I remember from playing with Pentaho and BIRT, these tools are quite difficult to install and learn. But if you don't mind invest your time into learning cumbersome user interfaces you get quite powerful tools at the end of the day.

May I suppose you are interested in open-source BI because of budget rather than 'religion'? If so I'd consider a low-cost/trial SaaS alternative at least to deliver a quick prototype to your users at first.

In the meantime use your time to evaluate and learn an open-source tool of your choice.

Finally, in a couple of weeks, you get happy users who can play with dimensions, create reports and give you valuable feedback and a good knowledge of a BI tool of your choice so you can do a qualified decision about which way to go.

Disclaimer: I work as a consultant for www.gooddata.com - a company that offers that kind of SaaS BI software I'm proposing to use at least to deliver an early prototype to your users. Feel free to ask for any help if you try to do it in the way outlined above.

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it's a mix, I'd call it the "budget religion" –  opensas May 4 '10 at 13:50
    
I think the key thing to consider is if you are able to support your BI project on your own or with the help of the community. If so, then that is great. Otherwise, be sure to start with getting a price quote or estimate from the companies behind the evaluated OSS tools just to avoid being surprised. –  koles May 4 '10 at 19:31
    
Are there other good SaaS solutions for an existing OLTP data store in Postgres or MySQL? I found LogiXML logixml.com/index.html –  Adam Nelson Jun 2 '10 at 20:08
    
Adam, take a look at developer.gooddata.com and github.com/gooddata/GoodData-CL. The GoodData CL tool (in beta now) allows you to fetch and connect data from multiple sources (OLTP via JDBC, SFDC, GA, CSV files) and load them into the GoodData analytical cloud. You can also join our webinar next week at www2.gotomeeting.com/register/649715859 if you are interested. –  koles Jul 8 '10 at 0:30
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Unlike the others, I would suggest using Jasper. The quality is far more superb and user friendly than Pentaho. You have to hack many different opensource library configs. I feel like I am using Crystal when I use Jasper, but I don't get that impression when using Pentaho.

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Have a look at Pentaho Community Edition Here I have used their ETL tool a bit and it works a charm.

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Pentaho FTW. I'm really happy with it. Mondrian works great over mysql. For reporting I'm using BIRT

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SpagoBI is a global solution which contains all the tools, from Birt reports to Jasper reports, and geolocalization analysis ... SpagoBI is free and easy to setup, have a look and make your own idea.

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