Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am planning to use ASP.NET MVC2 implemented membership system to manage users. Database that uses application should have tables that are related with these users. Is it possible to use two different databases and make relationships (foreign keys) between them or I will have to merge these two databases into one?

Thanks,
Ile

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is NOT possible to put up relationships between databases. You CAN use triggers to ensure relational integrity.

Otherwise I would say: all in one database, put them into different schemata.

share|improve this answer
    
"You CAN use triggers to ensure relational integrity" - What does this actually mean? Could you please be more precise? Thanks –  ile May 4 '10 at 9:13
1  
Well, a trigger (read up the documentation - actually a set of triggers) can be used to enfoce relational integrity. It is properly documented in - the documentation. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164047.aspx has an introduction on what triggers are. –  TomTom May 4 '10 at 10:06
1  
+1 for correct pluralisation of schema :-) –  Duncan Bayne Jul 20 '11 at 0:06

I would put membership/roles in a separate database. I don't think having foreign key constraints is that useful. Its better decoupling if you go through the membership API rather than join with the tables directly. The only thing in the membership database you might need to look up often is the username. If thats becomes a performance problem I'd probably just create an lookup table, either in memory or in a lookup table in the other component's database.

share|improve this answer
    
I there is a need to (for example) log/audit changes against a user identifier or to define "ownership" of data by user how do you reconcile the above? Foreign key constraints are self evidently useful? –  Murph May 4 '10 at 8:37
    
Add a column to store the guid the membership provider uses to identify the user. You can write this information to the log whether or not the DB enforces referential integrity. –  Frank Schwieterman May 4 '10 at 10:17

Hey buddy, I've posted an answer on this exact topic right here

I Hope it helps !

:-Dan

share|improve this answer
    
That's my topic by the way :D :D Thanks anyway, I'll write you a note out there which I forgot :)) –  ile May 18 '10 at 7:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.