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I have a batch file and I want to include external file containing some variables (say configuration variables). Is it possible?

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up vote 68 down vote accepted

Note: I'm assuming Windows batch files as most people seem to be unaware that there are significant differences and just blindly call everything with grey text on black background DOS. Nevertheless, the first variant should work in DOS as well.

Executable configuration

The easiest way to do this ist to just put the variables in a batch file themselves, each with its own set statement:

set var1=value1
set var2=value2
...

and in your main batch:

call config.cmd

Of course, that also enables variables to be created conditionally or depending on aspects of the system, so it's pretty versatile. However, arbitrary code can run there and if there is a syntax error, then your main batch will exit too. In the UNIX world this seems to be fairly common, especially for shells. And if you think about it, autoexec.bat is nothing else.

Key/value pairs

Another way would be some kind of var=value pairs in the configuration file:

var1=value1
var2=value2
...

You can then use the following snippet to load them:

for /f "delims=" %%x in (config.txt) do (set "%%x")

This utilizes a similar trick as before, namely just using set on each line. The quotes are there to escape things like <, >, &, |. However, they will themselves break when quotes are used in the input. Also you always need to be careful when further processing data in variables stored with such characters.

Generally, automatically escaping arbitrary input to cause no headaches or problems in batch files seems pretty impossible to me. At least I didn't find a way to do so yet. Of course, with the first solution you're pushing that responsibility to the one writing the config file.

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If the external configuration file is also valid batch file, you can just use:

call externalconfig.bat

inside your script. Try creating following a.bat:

@echo off
call b.bat
echo %MYVAR%

and b.bat:

set MYVAR=test

Running a.bat should generate output:

test
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Batch uses the less than and greater than brackets as input and output pipes.

>file.ext

Using only one output bracket like above will overwrite all the information in that file.

>>file.ext

Using the double right bracket will add the next line to the file.

(
echo
echo
)<file.ext

This will execute the parameters based on the lines of the file. In this case, we are using two lines that will be typed using "echo". The left bracket touching the right parenthesis bracket means that the information from that file will be piped into those lines.

I have compiled an example-only read/write file. Below is the file broken down into sections to explain what each part does.

@echo off
echo TEST R/W
set SRU=0

SRU can be anything in this example. We're actually setting it to prevent a crash if you press Enter too fast.

set /p SRU=Skip Save? (y): 
if %SRU%==y goto read
set input=1
set input2=2
set /p input=INPUT: 
set /p input2=INPUT2: 

Now, we need to write the variables to a file.

(echo %input%)> settings.cdb
(echo %input2%)>> settings.cdb
pause

I use .cdb as a short form for "Command Database". You can use any extension. The next section is to test the code from scratch. We don't want to use the set variables that were run at the beginning of the file, we actually want them to load FROM the settings.cdb we just wrote.

:read
(
set /p input=
set /p input2=
)<settings.cdb

So, we just piped the first two lines of information that you wrote at the beginning of the file (which you have the option to skip setting the lines to check to make sure it's working) to set the variables of input and input2.

echo %input%
echo %input2%
pause
if %input%==1 goto newecho
pause
exit

:newecho
echo If you can see this, good job!
pause
exit

This displays the information that was set while settings.cdb was piped into the parenthesis. As an extra good-job motivator, pressing enter and setting the default values which we set earlier as "1" will return a good job message. Using the bracket pipes goes both ways, and is much easier than setting the "FOR" stuff. :)

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Let's not forget good old parameters. When starting your *.bat or *.cmd file you can add up to nine parameters after the command file name:

call myscript.bat \\path\to\my\file.ext type
call myscript.bat \\path\to\my\file.ext "Del /F"

Example script

The myscript.bat could be something like this:

@Echo Off
Echo The path of this scriptfile %~0
Echo The name of this scriptfile %~n0
Echo The extension of this scriptfile %~x0
Echo.
If "%~2"=="" (
   Echo Parameter missing, quitting.
   GoTo :EOF
)
If Not Exist "%~1" (
   Echo File does not exist, quitting.
   GoTo :EOF
)
Echo Going to %~2 this file: %~1
%~2 "%~1"
If %errorlevel%  NEQ 0 (
   Echo Failed to %~2 the %~1.
)
@Echo On

Example output

c:\>c:\bats\myscript.bat \\server\path\x.txt type
The path of this scriptfile c:\bats\myscript.bat
The name of this scriptfile myscript
The extension of this scriptfile .bat

Going to type this file: \\server\path\x.txt
This is the content of the file:
Some alphabets: ABCDEFG abcdefg
Some numbers: 1234567890

c:\>c:\bats\myscript.bat \\server\path\x.txt "del /f "
The path of this scriptfile c:\bats\myscript.bat
The name of this scriptfile myscript
The extension of this scriptfile .bat

Going to del /f  this file: \\server\path\x.txt

c:\>
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So you just have to do this right?:

@echo off
echo text shizzle
echo.
echo pause^>nul (press enter)
pause>nul

REM writing to file
(
echo XD
echo LOL
)>settings.cdb
cls

REM setting the variables out of the file
(
set /p input=
set /p input2=
)<settings.cdb
cls

REM echo'ing the variables
echo variables:
echo %input%
echo %input2%
pause>nul

if %input%==XD goto newecho
DEL settings.cdb
exit

:newecho
cls
echo If you can see this, good job!
DEL settings.cdb
pause>nul
exit
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3  
Add an explanation along with your code sample. – krsteeve Sep 27 '13 at 16:23
:: savevars.bat
:: Use $ to prefix any important variable to save it for future runs.

@ECHO OFF
SETLOCAL

REM Load variables
IF EXIST config.txt FOR /F "delims=" %%A IN (config.txt) DO SET "%%A"

REM Change variables
IF NOT DEFINED $RunCount (
    SET $RunCount=1
) ELSE SET /A $RunCount+=1

REM Display variables
SET $

REM Save variables
SET $>config.txt

ENDLOCAL
PAUSE
EXIT /B

Output:

$RunCount=1

$RunCount=2

$RunCount=3

The technique outlined above can also be used to share variables among multiple batch files.

Source: http://www.incodesystems.com/products/batchfi1.htm

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