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I'm trying to decode encoded long dash from numeric entity to string, but it seems that I can't find a function which can do this properly.

The best that I found is mb_decode_numericentity(), however, for some reason it fails to decode long dash and some other special characters.

$str = '–';

$str = mb_decode_numericentity($str, array(0xFF, 0x2FFFF, 0, 0xFFFF), 'ISO-8859-1');

This will return "?".

Anyone knows how to solve this problem?

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2  
Is long dash present in the ISO-8859-1? –  Your Common Sense May 4 '10 at 11:30
1  
@ColShrapnel: Indeed not. It's present in Windows cp1252, which is similar, but not ISO-8859-1. Better: use UTF-8. –  bobince May 4 '10 at 11:42
    
Definitely, there is no long dash in ISO/IEC 8859-1 (Latin-1). Actually, this is a unicode character, and using UTF-8 helped. It was my mistake that I forgot to change encoding in the browser. Thanks everyone! –  Yuriy May 4 '10 at 12:21

3 Answers 3

The following code snippet (mostly stolen from here and improved) will work for literal, numeric decimal, and numeric hexa-decimal entities:

header("content-type: text/html; charset=utf-8");

/**
* Decodes all HTML entities, including numeric and hexadecimal ones.
* 
* @param mixed $string
* @return string decoded HTML
*/

function html_entity_decode_numeric($string, $quote_style = ENT_COMPAT, $charset = "utf-8")
{
$string = html_entity_decode($string, $quote_style, $charset);
$string = preg_replace_callback('~&#x([0-9a-fA-F]+);~i', "chr_utf8_callback", $string);
$string = preg_replace('~&#([0-9]+);~e', 'chr_utf8("\\1")', $string);
return $string; 
}

/** 
 * Callback helper 
 */

function chr_utf8_callback($matches)
 { 
  return chr_utf8(hexdec($matches[1])); 
 }

/**
* Multi-byte chr(): Will turn a numeric argument into a UTF-8 string.
* 
* @param mixed $num
* @return string
*/

function chr_utf8($num)
{
if ($num < 128) return chr($num);
if ($num < 2048) return chr(($num >> 6) + 192) . chr(($num & 63) + 128);
if ($num < 65536) return chr(($num >> 12) + 224) . chr((($num >> 6) & 63) + 128) . chr(($num & 63) + 128);
if ($num < 2097152) return chr(($num >> 18) + 240) . chr((($num >> 12) & 63) + 128) . chr((($num >> 6) & 63) + 128) . chr(($num & 63) + 128);
return '';
}


$string ="&#x201D;"; 

echo html_entity_decode_numeric($string);

Improvement suggestions are welcome.

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Though &apos; is not a valid html entity reference, it is not rare to "spill over" from XML documents. Add the following to be completely water-proof: $string = str_ireplace('&apos;', "'", $string); –  Tilman Feb 16 '12 at 4:13
1  
Another improvement: This code has a terrible memory leak. Each time this is called a new lambda function created with create_function() get stuck in memory. Yes, the manual on preg_replace_callback() suggests that the lambda function is a "great idea" to make the code look cleaner. But it is wrong. There is nothing wrong with creating a simple real function function chr_utf8_callback($matches) { return chr_utf8(hexdec($matches[1])); } and using this instead $string = preg_replace_callback('~&#x([0-9a-fA-F]+);~i', chr_utf8_callback, $string); Memory leak gone. –  Tilman Feb 21 '12 at 6:18
    
@Tilman very good point, fixed, thanks! –  Pekka 웃 Feb 21 '12 at 10:43

8211 is a decimal Unicode character code point. In hexadecimal, that's 2013.

$str = '\u2013';
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But he's decoding HTML entities, so the input will be in the format he used, presumably. –  Anthony May 4 '10 at 11:33

mb_decode_numericentity does not handle hexadecimal, only decimal. Do you get the expected result with:

$str = '–';

$str = mb_decode_numericentity ( $str , Array(255, 3145727, 0, 65535) , 'ISO-8859-1');

You can use hexdec to convert your hexadecimal to decimal.

Also, out of curiosity, does the following work:

$str = '&#8211;';

 $str = html_entity_decode($str);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for a quick reply, but this returns '?' as well. –  Yuriy May 4 '10 at 11:39
    
>$str = html_entity_decode($str); That was the first thing I tried. No. –  Yuriy May 4 '10 at 11:46

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