Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating a linux service , in the skeleton file it is mentioned that we need to run various rc commands(rc-status ,rc_reset) to update the service status. What does this actually mean. I have googled it but not able find many details. Can somebody help me

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The commands from rc.status are actually SuSe specific I think. AFAICT they handle two things: output to the user and the final return status of the script. rc_status checks if the previous command (i.e. the start/restart/stop of a service) executed successfully and sets the "status value", which is the return value returned by rc_exit (which you place at the end of your init.d script). Source

You can conceivably write your shell script without them, but I assume they help making sure that your script conforms to LSB requirements and blends in well with other system scripts. I bet most of this is actually documented in the /etc/rc.status file, though. I just don't have a suse box handy.

share|improve this answer

You need a shell script to stop/start/restart your service and to give its status. These are generally called rc scripts. Have a look in directory /etc/init.d to see some examples - /etc/init.d/klogd is quite a simple one.

The reason they are in init.d is because they also need to be run automatically at boot up to restore the service.

Each Linux variant tends to be a bit different on how the boot up works but the Debian system is fairly typical as it is the basis for many other distributions - see Debian Boot Up Manager

share|improve this answer

Here is the comments block from /etc/init.d/skeleton from SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP3:

#!/bin/sh
#
#     Template SUSE system startup script for example service/daemon FOO
#     Copyright (C) 1995--2005  Kurt Garloff, SUSE / Novell Inc.
#          
#     This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
#     under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by
#     the Free Software Foundation; either version 2.1 of the License, or (at
#     your option) any later version.
#                 
#     This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
#     WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
#     MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
#     Lesser General Public License for more details.
#      
#     You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public
#     License along with this library; if not, write to the Free Software
#     Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307,
#     USA.
#
# /etc/init.d/FOO
#   and its symbolic link
# /(usr/)sbin/rcFOO
#
# Template system startup script for some example service/daemon FOO
#
# LSB compatible service control script; see http://www.linuxbase.org/spec/
# 
# Note: This template uses functions rc_XXX defined in /etc/rc.status on
# UnitedLinux/SUSE/Novell based Linux distributions. If you want to base your
# script on this template and ensure that it works on non UL based LSB 
# compliant Linux distributions, you either have to provide the rc.status
# functions from UL or change the script to work without them.
# See skeleton.compat for a template that works with other distros as well.
#
### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides:          FOO
# Required-Start:    $syslog $remote_fs
# Should-Start:      $time ypbind smtp
# Required-Stop:     $syslog $remote_fs
# Should-Stop:       ypbind smtp
# Default-Start:     3 5
# Default-Stop:      0 1 2 6
# Short-Description: FOO XYZ daemon providing ZYX
# Description:       Start FOO to allow XY and provide YZ
#   continued on second line by '#<TAB>'
#   should contain enough info for the runlevel editor
#   to give admin some idea what this service does and
#   what it's needed for ...
#   (The Short-Description should already be a good hint.)
### END INIT INFO
# 
# Any extensions to the keywords given above should be preceeded by 
# X-VendorTag- (X-UnitedLinux- X-SuSE- for us) according to LSB.
# 
# Notes on Required-Start/Should-Start:
# * There are two different issues that are solved by Required-Start
#    and Should-Start
# (a) Hard dependencies: This is used by the runlevel editor to determine
#     which services absolutely need to be started to make the start of
#     this service make sense. Example: nfsserver should have
#     Required-Start: $portmap
#     Also, required services are started before the dependent ones.
#     The runlevel editor will warn about such missing hard dependencies
#     and suggest enabling. During system startup, you may expect an error,
#     if the dependency is not fulfilled.
# (b) Specifying the init script ordering, not real (hard) dependencies.
#     This is needed by insserv to determine which service should be
#     started first (and at a later stage what services can be started
#     in parallel). The tag Should-Start: is used for this.
#     It tells, that if a service is available, it should be started
#     before. If not, never mind.
# * When specifying hard dependencies or ordering requirements, you can 
#   use names of services (contents of their Provides: section)
#   or pseudo names starting with a $. The following ones are available
#   according to LSB (1.1):
#   $local_fs       all local file systems are mounted
#               (most services should need this!)
#   $remote_fs      all remote file systems are mounted
#               (note that /usr may be remote, so
#                many services should Require this!)
#   $syslog         system logging facility up
#   $network        low level networking (eth card, ...)
#   $named          hostname resolution available
#   $netdaemons     all network daemons are running
#   The $netdaemons pseudo service has been removed in LSB 1.2.
#   For now, we still offer it for backward compatibility.
#   These are new (LSB 1.2):
#   $time           the system time has been set correctly  
#   $portmap        SunRPC portmapping service available
#   UnitedLinux extensions:
#   $ALL            indicates that a script should be inserted
#               at the end
# * The services specified in the stop tags 
#   (Required-Stop/Should-Stop)
#   specify which services need to be still running when this service
#   is shut down. Often the entries there are just copies or a subset 
#   from the respective start tag.
# * Should-Start/Stop are now part of LSB as of 2.0,
#   formerly SUSE/Unitedlinux used X-UnitedLinux-Should-Start/-Stop.
#   insserv does support both variants.
# * X-UnitedLinux-Default-Enabled: yes/no is used at installation time
#   (%fillup_and_insserv macro in %post of many RPMs) to specify whether
#   a startup script should default to be enabled after installation.
#   It's not used by insserv.
#
# Note on runlevels:
# 0 - halt/poweroff             6 - reboot
# 1 - single user           2 - multiuser without network exported
# 3 - multiuser w/ network (text mode)  5 - multiuser w/ network and X11 (xdm)
# 
# Note on script names:
# http://www.linuxbase.org/spec/refspecs/LSB_1.3.0/gLSB/gLSB/scrptnames.html
# A registry has been set up to manage the init script namespace.
# http://www.lanana.org/
# Please use the names already registered or register one or use a
# vendor prefix.
#...
# Source LSB init functions
# providing start_daemon, killproc, pidofproc, 
# log_success_msg, log_failure_msg and log_warning_msg.
# This is currently not used by UnitedLinux based distributions and
# not needed for init scripts for UnitedLinux only. If it is used,
# the functions from rc.status should not be sourced or used.
#. /lib/lsb/init-functions
#
# Shell functions sourced from /etc/rc.status:
#      rc_check         check and set local and overall rc status
#      rc_status        check and set local and overall rc status
#      rc_status -v     be verbose in local rc status and clear it afterwards
#      rc_status -v -r  ditto and clear both the local and overall rc status
#      rc_status -s     display "skipped" and exit with status 3
#      rc_status -u     display "unused" and exit with status 3
#      rc_failed        set local and overall rc status to failed
#      rc_failed <num>  set local and overall rc status to <num>
#      rc_reset         clear both the local and overall rc status
#      rc_exit          exit appropriate to overall rc status
#      rc_active        checks whether a service is activated by symlinks
#...
#
# Return values acc. to LSB for all commands but status:
# 0   - success
# 1       - generic or unspecified error
# 2       - invalid or excess argument(s)
# 3       - unimplemented feature (e.g. "reload")
# 4       - user had insufficient privileges
# 5       - program is not installed
# 6       - program is not configured
# 7       - program is not running
# 8--199  - reserved (8--99 LSB, 100--149 distrib, 150--199 appl)
# 
# Note that starting an already running service, stopping
# or restarting a not-running service as well as the restart
# with force-reload (in case signaling is not supported) are
# considered a success.
#...
## Check status with checkproc(8), if process is running
## checkproc will return with exit status 0.
#
# Return value is slightly different for the status command:
# 0 - service up and running
# 1 - service dead, but /var/run/  pid  file exists
# 2 - service dead, but /var/lock/ lock file exists
# 3 - service not running (unused)
# 4 - service status unknown :-(
# 5--199 reserved (5--99 LSB, 100--149 distro, 150--199 appl.)

Here is the comments block from /etc/rc.status from SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP3:

# /etc/rc.status
# vim: syntax=sh
# Definition of boot script return messages
#
#   The bootscripts should use the variables rc_done and rc_failed to
#   report whether they failed or succeeded.  See /etc/init.d/skeleton for
#   an example how the shell functions rc_status and rc_reset are used.
#
#   These functions make use of the variables rc_done and rc_failed;
#   rc_done_up and rc_failed_up are the same as rc_done and rc_failed
#   but contain a terminal code to move up one line before the output
#   of the actual string. (This is particularly useful when the script
#    starts a daemon which produces user output with a newline character)
#
#   The variable rc_reset is used by the master resource control script
#   /etc/init.d/rc to turn off all attributes and switch to the standard
#   character set.
#
#    \033          ascii ESCape
#    \033[<NUM>G   move to column <NUM> (linux console, xterm, not vt100)
#    \033[<NUM>C   move <NUM> columns forward but only upto last column
#    \033[<NUM>D   move <NUM> columns backward but only upto first column
#    \033[<NUM>A   move <NUM> rows up
#    \033[<NUM>B   move <NUM> rows down
#    \033[1m       switch on bold
#    \033[31m      switch on red
#    \033[32m      switch on green
#    \033[33m      switch on yellow
#    \033[m        switch off color/bold
#    \017          exit alternate mode (xterm, vt100, linux console)
#    \033[10m      exit alternate mode (linux console)
#    \015          carriage return (without newline)
share|improve this answer
    
This does not really answer the question. –  James King Apr 11 at 1:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.