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EDIT2:
I omitted the line that updates the UI "urrentNode.set_checked(checked);", and it run amazingly fast. Apparently this is the reason of that performance bottleneck, what do you guys suggest?

Hello SO,

In short, I'm dealing with Telerik's RadTreeView, and I want enable checking all the child nodes if the user checked the parent node. Simple enough! OK here's my code that handles OnClientNodeChecked event of the TreeView:

function UpdateAllChildren(nodes, checked) {

            var i;
            for (i = 0; i < nodes.get_count(); i++) {
                var currentNode = nodes.getNode(i);
                currentNode.set_checked(checked);                    
                if (currentNode.get_nodes().get_count() > 0) {
                   UpdateAllChildren(currentNode.get_nodes(), checked);                   
                }
            }
        }       

        function ClientNodeChecked(sender, eventArgs) {
            var node = eventArgs.get_node();         
            UpdateAllChildren(node.get_nodes(), node.get_checked());
        }

And here's the TreeView's markup:

<telerik:RadTreeView ID="RadTreeView1" runat="server" CheckBoxes="True" OnClientNodeChecked="ClientNodeChecked"></telerik:RadTreeView>

The tree contains quite a lot of nodes, and this is causing my targeted browser (ehm, that's IE7) to really slow down while running it. Furthermore IE7 displays an error message asking me to stop the page from running scripts as it's might make my computer not responsive (yeah, scary enough). So what do you guys propose to optimize this code?
EDIT: Runs pretty fast in firefox and chrome of course. Needles to say, hah?

Thanks in advance

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7 Answers 7

For sure save your objects for reuse:

var i;
for (i = 0, n=nodes.get_count(); i < n; i++) {
  var currentNode = nodes.getNode(i);
  currentNode.set_checked(checked);
  var curNodes = currentNode.get_nodes();
  if (curNodes.get_count() > 0) {
    UpdateAllChildren(curNodes, checked);                   
  }
}
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PS: What does set_checked and UpdateAllChildren do? –  mplungjan May 4 '10 at 12:38
    
mplungjan: The set_checked method sets the checked property of the node. The UpdateAddChildren function is the recursive function that you just suggested changes for. –  Guffa May 4 '10 at 12:40
    
yeah, sure. Done that, however, I didn't notice any difference. –  Galilyou May 4 '10 at 15:38

Avoid repeating calls to the objects. Get the value in a variable and reuse the variable. You don't need to check if the node collection is empty before calling the function, as the function already does that (in the loop condition).

function UpdateAllChildren(nodes, checked) {
  var cnt = nodes.get_count();
  for (var i = 0; i < cnt; i++) {
    var currentNode = nodes.getNode(i);
    currentNode.set_checked(checked);
    UpdateAllChildren(currentNode.get_nodes(), checked);                   
  }
}
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Please check my edits –  Galilyou May 4 '10 at 16:15
    
Does the set_checked call cause the ClientNodeChecked event to trigger so that you are updating the children twice (and four times on the next level and so on)? Put a breakpoint or an alert in it to check it. In that case you wouldn't need the recursive call in the function, the event would make it recursive. –  Guffa May 4 '10 at 16:45
    
NO it's not. I checked this and console.log it and, yeah, it was called one time only. –  Galilyou May 4 '10 at 17:09

Profile it in a proper browser to see where it's spending most of its time.

Like @mplungjan says, reuse objects.

It seems unlikely the get_count call is expensive, but if it is you can drop the check before recursing down.

If the library is slow you could possibly cheat and simulate click events yourself.

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Nope, get_count() is not the expensive part, plz check my edit. –  Galilyou May 4 '10 at 15:41
    
Assume you've tried this: telerik.com/help/aspnet-ajax/… –  wombleton May 4 '10 at 20:49
    
Thank you for the link, actually this helped resolving IE's problem dialog. Still no noticeable performance gain, though. –  Galilyou May 5 '10 at 13:31
    
Have you profiled set_checked to see where it's spending most of its time? There might be something in the library you could fix for IE. (hell if I know though) –  wombleton May 5 '10 at 21:29

It's a guess, but I believe that set_checked calls ClientNodeChecked. This is why it's called many more times than it needs to be.

The easiest way to make sure of this is to run it in FF with Firebug, and use console.log to see how it's called exactly.

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Tayseer, thanks for your answer. I checked with firebug's console, the event is raised only once. –  Galilyou May 4 '10 at 15:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, apparently the problem is that the call to set_checked() is the most expensive part. I omitted it from the code and the recursive call went pretty fast. I also modified the ScriptMode property on the script manager to be "release" and this helped get rid of IE's annoying dialog, but the performance is still as slow. Case closed.

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I was also facing the same problem but was able to solve it. I didn't use set_checked function . Instead I used the jquery to find the underlying checkbox and set the checked attribute. Here is how I did it.

function ClientNodeChecked(sender, eventArgs) {
var node = eventArgs._node;
var checked = node._properties._data.checked

if (node.get_nodes()._array.length == 0) {
    UpdateNode(node, checked);
}
else {
    UpdateAllChildren(node.get_nodes(), checked);
}

}

function UpdateAllChildren(nodes, checked) {
var i;
var currentNode;
for (i = 0; i < nodes._array.length; i++) {
    currentNode = nodes._array[i];
    if (checked) {
        //$(eventArgs._node._children._array[1]._element).find("input:checkbox").attr("checked", "true")
        $(currentNode._element).find("input:checkbox").attr("checked", "true");
    }
    else {
        $(currentNode._element).find("input:checkbox").removeAttr("checked");
    }
    var childNodes = currentNode.get_nodes();
    if (childNodes._array.length > 0) {
        UpdateAllChildren(childNodes, checked);
    }
}

}

function UpdateNode(node, checked) {
if (checked) {
    //$(eventArgs._node._children._array[1]._element).find("input:checkbox").attr("checked", "true")
    $(node._element).find("input:checkbox").attr("checked", "true");
}
else {
    $(node._element).find("input:checkbox").removeAttr("checked");
}

}

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I noticed that set_checked() is the slow part of this loop too. This is a lot faster for me:

currentNode.get_checkBoxElement().checked = checked;

Note: get_checkBoxElement() is a telerik function

Obviously this bypasses some Telerik stuff like checking for disabled nodes and possibly tracking changes. The client side get_checked() function won't return checked nodes and on the server side, they won't appear as checked. This worked for me because I am only getting the checked values in the client side.

Also setting ScriptMode="Release" in the RadScriptManager of the page helped quite a bit, but not as much as the above did. It did make the performance with set_checked() acceptable though:

<telerik:RadScriptManager ID="RadScriptManager1"     
                         ScriptMode="Release"    
                         runat="server">

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