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Hi i am trying to handle an ajax json response

here is my code

success: function (j) {     
    switch(true)
    {
        case (j.choice1):

            alert("choice2");
        break;
        case (j.choice2):
                alert("choice2");
        break;
        default:
            alert("default");
        break;
    }
}

based on what j is return i do my action BUT i keep getting the default.

I have alert the j values and come correct.Some how case (j.choice1) case (j.choice2) is not working.

I tried case (j.choice1!="") (j.choice2!="") But in this scenario i keep getting the first choice.

What am i missing

share|improve this question
    
Why are you using a switch statement for a task that's best suited to an if statement? –  Andy E May 4 '10 at 14:12
    
You're alerting "choice2" in both of the first two cases. Is that what you intended? –  Syntactic May 4 '10 at 14:13
    
well you get a vote for an odd yet interesting question. so what are your possible values for j.choice1 and j.choice2? –  lincolnk May 4 '10 at 15:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It works for me:

var a = 0, b = true;

switch(true) {
    case a:
        alert('a');
        break;
    case b:
        alert('b');
        break;
}

However, the case labels must be equal to true, not jut implicitly true.
Also, only the first case that evaluates to true will execute.

share|improve this answer

SOLVED

Based on SLaks answer i modify the code as below

    if(j.choice1){ var choice1=true;} else { var choice1=false;}
    if(j.choice2){ var choice2=true;} else { var choice2=false;}

    switch(true)
    {
        case choice1:
            alert("choice1");
        break;
        case choice2:
            alert("choice2");
        break;
        default:
            alert("default");
        break;
    }

For all asking why switch and not if.

Switch will execute only 1 statement, but if can execute more than 1 if any mistake come form response (for example if set choice1 and choice 2 the if will alert both but switch will alert only choice1).

The response expecting as choice has to do with credit card charge to bank so i want to ensure that only 1 action will exetute

Thank to all

share|improve this answer
2  
An if/else if chain will execute at most one branch as well. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 16 '12 at 13:12
    
You have that inverted. An if statement will only execute the single block, using switch(true) or switch(false) will allow you to fall through to a lower adjacent statement if you leave out the break. Beware the subsequent case you fall through to will not be evaluated. –  Steve Buzonas Jan 2 at 4:31

You need to read up on the switch statement. You should not be switching on a constant value.

It appears that you need to use if statements, as you don't really want to be switching on your j value:

success: function (j) {     
    if (j.choice1)
    {
        alert("choice1");
        break;
    }

    if (j.choice2)
    {
        alert("choice2");
        break;
    }

    alert("default");
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just curious: why should one not switch on a constant value? –  Tim Down May 4 '10 at 14:43
    
It will provide the same result every time. It's somewhat akin to if(x = y) condition –  Pops May 4 '10 at 15:01
    
@Lord Torgamus: technically, it would only be similar if y was always truthy or always falsey. –  Matthew Crumley May 4 '10 at 16:26
7  
I'm failing to see the real problem with using switch like this. The task is to find only the first occurrence of true in a short, pre-defined list of values, which the switch statement achieves correctly. The only other sane looking option that occurs to me is using if/else if. The switch statement to me is just as readable as if/else if and works just as well, so unless there's a performance issue (and I can't see why there would be), I don't see a problem. –  Tim Down May 5 '10 at 8:50
6  
Yes --- I think that you're being overly dogmatic about it, and I see a readability tradeoff either way. The switch statement gives me a visual cue that none of the following conditions will be evaluated, where with the series of ifs I have to notice the returns to realize that. I think switch(true) is a good and useful idiom and shouldn't be rejected, though this exact usage is not ideal. –  JasonFruit Aug 10 '12 at 19:44

In a case like this, a better way to do this is probably something like:

success: function (j) {
    if(j.choice1 || j.choice2) {
        alert("choice2");
    } else {
        alert("default");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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