Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The code I'm working with has a class called Environment that is not in any namespace. Unfortunately if I am in a class that imports the System namespace, there is no way to refer to the custom class called Environment. I know this was an unfortunate choice and should be refactored, but is there any way I can explicitly refer to the conflicting class?

In C++ it seems the way to do this is by using ::, and in Java there is something called global:: How do I do it in C#?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 32 down vote accepted

C# also has a global (or unnamed) namespace - you can use global:: to access your class:

global::Environment 

See more on MSDN. Also see the :: operator.

You can create an alias for it as well:

using myEnv = global::Environment;
using sysEnv = System.Environment;
share|improve this answer
    
@Oded your answer is a bit irrelevant. Question was: "but is there any way I can explicitly refer to the conflicting class" –  Andrey May 4 '10 at 18:11
3  
@Andrey - The example shows exactly how to explicitly refer to the Environment class that has no namespace. –  Oded May 4 '10 at 18:12
    
sorry, i misread question –  Andrey May 4 '10 at 18:20
    
Why didn't I try that... I knew about the Java solution :S –  JoelFan May 4 '10 at 18:37
2  
FYI you can also use a similar trick if you end up in the unfortunate situation of having two referenced DLLs which have the same type name in the same namespace. You say "extern alias FOO;" and then you can use "FOO::Blah.Bar" to mean "the Blah.Bar that appears in foo.dll". You just have to remember to say /r:FOO=foo.dll on the command line. –  Eric Lippert May 4 '10 at 21:15

Should be global::Environment just like in Java

share|improve this answer

The code I'm working with has a class called Environment that is not in any namespace

You should absolutely change that. Or if it’s not your code, file a bug report and defer usage until the bug is fixed. Not using a namespace – that’s an absolute no-go.

(Notwithstanding the well-working solution posted by @Oded.)

share|improve this answer
    
can you justify this policy ? –  Proviste Jul 7 '11 at 13:55
2  
@Proviste If that thread isn’t justification enough I won’t be able to change that. Namespaces avoid name clashes. That is all. It is a fixed policy in .NET, never to have a namespace-less class. Ever. The same counts for Java and packages. Namespaces only work if you use them. If you don’t use them – why support them at all? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 7 '11 at 14:09
    
thank you. i think it's a good way to easily share a class all over the app. I understand it's dirty. How would you get the same advantage with keeping a namespace ? –  Proviste Jul 11 '11 at 12:54
1  
@Proviste “i think it's a good way to easily share a class all over the app” – you can do the same while using namespaces. What’s preventing you? Just to stress this again, using namespaces has no disadvantage. Not a single one. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 11 '11 at 13:35
2  
"file a bug report and defer usage until the bug is fixed" A bit harsh? Especially if you're working on something that a customer is waiting for. "Yeah, I know I told you it would be ready this week but I've stopped development for now because I don't like the decision that some other guy you know nothing about made. I'll just sit here twiddling my thumbs for now and wait for him to get back to me" –  noggin182 Oct 18 '13 at 15:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.