Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am working on a C program that uses a Union. The union definition is in FILE_A header file and looks like this...

// FILE_A.h****************************************************
xdata union  
{
long position;
char bytes[4];
}CurrentPosition;

If I set the value of CurrentPosition.position in FILE_A.c and then call a function in FILE_B.c that uses the union, the data in the union is back to Zero. This is demonstrated below.

// FILE_A.c****************************************************
int main.c(void)
{
    CurrentPosition.position = 12345;
    SomeFunctionInFileB();
}

// FILE_B.c****************************************************
void SomeFunctionInFileB(void)
{
    // After the following lines execute I see all zeros in the flash memory.
    WriteByteToFlash(CurrentPosition.bytes[0];
    WriteByteToFlash(CurrentPosition.bytes[1];
    WriteByteToFlash(CurrentPosition.bytes[2];
    WriteByteToFlash(CurrentPosition.bytes[3];
}

Now, If I pass a long to SomeFunctionInFileB(long temp) and then store it into CurrentPosition.bytes within that function, and finally call WriteBytesToFlash(CurrentPosition.bytes[n]... it works just fine.

It appears as though the CurrentPosition Union is not global. So I tried changing the union definition in the header file to include the extern keyword like this...

extern xdata union  
{
long position;
char bytes[4];
}CurrentPosition;

and then putting this in the source (.c) file...

xdata union  
{
    long position;
    char bytes[4];
}CurrentPosition;

but this causes a compile error that says:

C:\SiLabs\Optec Programs\AgosRot\MotionControl.c:76: error 91: extern definition for 'CurrentPosition' mismatches with declaration. C:\SiLabs\Optec Programs\AgosRot\/MotionControl.h:48: error 177: previously defined here

So what am I doing wrong? How do I make the union global?

share|improve this question
1  
@Daniel - incorrect - exactly the opposite is true, it was the original purpose of a union to get access to the bytes of long or an int or a float - dangerous and machine dependent they are..... –  KevinDTimm May 4 '10 at 19:55
4  
I swear I read the title as 'Trouble with Unicorns in C program'. I'm spending too much time on Meta. –  George Stocker May 4 '10 at 19:57
1  
@George - Unicorns are ALWAYS trouble in C programs –  KevinDTimm May 4 '10 at 20:00
1  
This really isn't about unions at all - it's about scoping and declaration vs. definition of a variable. Re-title the question? Re-tag it? –  Stephen P May 4 '10 at 20:01
1  
It's not about unions at all, but unions are for both things: conserving precious bits, and accessing one field from a field of a different type. Both are sometimes useful, but usually fraught with dangers best avoided. –  WhirlWind May 4 '10 at 20:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Is FILE_A.h really MotionControl.h? If so I think the fix is to define a union type in the header:

typedef
union xdata
{
    long position;
    char bytes[4];
} xdata;

And declare a global variable of that type elsewhere in a header file (maybe the same one):

extern xdata CurrentPosition;   // in a header file

Finally define the global variable in a C file exactly once. Maybe in file_a.c:

xdata CurrentPosition;

Of course a better fix might be to pass the xdata variable you want to write out to flash to SomeFunctionInFileB() so you don't have to depend on a global variable, which are well known to be problematic when not very, very carefully used. And there seems to be no good reason to not pass the data as a parameter:

// in a header file
void SomeFunctionInFileB( xdata const* pPosition);


void SomeFunctionInFileB( xdata const* pPosition)
{
    // After the following lines execute I see all zeros in the flash memory.
    WriteByteToFlash(pPosition->bytes[0];
    WriteByteToFlash(pPosition->bytes[1];
    WriteByteToFlash(pPosition->bytes[2];
    WriteByteToFlash(pPosition->bytes[3];
}

And call it like so:

int main.c(void)
{
    CurrentPosition.position = 12345;
    SomeFunctionInFileB( &CurrentPosition);
}
share|improve this answer
    
In the definition of the union, why do you put 'xdata' in two places? Doesn't this make the name of the union 'xdata'? –  PICyourBrain May 4 '10 at 20:10
    
My intent was to use the xdata keyword to tell the compiler to put the variable in the slower external memory. This program is for an embedded device. –  PICyourBrain May 4 '10 at 20:16
    
Oh - I thought that xdata was intended to be the name of the union type. If xdata is a keyword/attribute for the compiler to put data in specific place, adjust accordingly (give the union type an appropriate name, and put the xdata attribute on the variable). –  Michael Burr May 4 '10 at 20:21
    
@JordanS: the xdata name is used twice in the union typedef to give it a slightly easier name tio use (as mentioned in the previous comment, I wasn't aware that xdata wasn't supposed to be the name of the union type). See the following for details: stackoverflow.com/questions/252780/… –  Michael Burr May 4 '10 at 20:24

Ideally you need a typedef for the union and an extern declaration in FILE_A.h and the actual definition of the union in FILE_A.c.

-

// FILE_A.h

typedef union  
{
    long position;
    char bytes[4];
} Position;

extern Position CurrentPosition; // declaration

-

// FILE_A.c

#include "FILE_A.h"

Position CurrentPosition; // definition

int main(void)
{
    CurrentPosition.position = 12345;
    SomeFunctionInFileB();
    return 0;
}

-

// FILE_B.c

#include "FILE_A.h"

void SomeFunctionInFileB(void)
{
    // now there will be valid data in the flash memory.
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[0];
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[1];
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[2];
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[3];
}

-

share|improve this answer

You haven't instantiated the union.
You need :

// FILE_A.c****************************************************

#include "File_a.h"
CurrentPosition cp;
int main(void)
{
    cp.position = 12345;
    SomeFunctionInFileB();
}

// FILE_B.c****************************************************
#include "File_a.h"
extern CurrentPosition cp;
void SomeFunctionInFileB(void)
{
    // now there will be valid data in the flash memory.
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[0];
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[1];
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[2];
    WriteByteToFlash(cp.bytes[3];
}
share|improve this answer
    
[whiny rant]bummer - I see I need to post my incomplete answers first, then flesh them out....[/whiny rant] –  KevinDTimm May 4 '10 at 20:02

If sizeof(long) is not 4, then endianess comes into play...

consider

union{
   long position
   char bytes[sizeof long];
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.