Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've skimmed Programming in Lua, I've looked at the Lua Reference.

However, they both tells me this function does this, but not how.

When reading SICP, I got this feeling of: "ah, here's the computational model underlying scheme"; I'm trying to get the same sense concerning Lua -- i.e. a concise description of it's vm, a "how" rather than a "what".

Does anyone know of a good document (besides the C source) describing this?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You might want to read the No-Frills Intro to Lua 5(.1) VM Instructions (pick a link, click on the Docs tab, choose English -> Go).

I don't remember exactly where I've seen it, but I remember reading that Lua's authors specifically discourage end-users from getting into too much detail on the VM; I think they want it to be as much of an implementation detail as possible.

share|improve this answer

Besides already mentioned A No-Frills Introduction to Lua 5.1 VM Instructions, you may be interested in this excellent post by Mike Pall on how to read Lua source.

Also see related Lua-Users Wiki page.

share|improve this answer

See http://www.lua.org/source/5.1/lopcodes.h.html . The list starts at OP_MOVE.

share|improve this answer

I've found The Implementation of Lua 5.1 very useful for understanding what Lua is actually doing.

It explains the hashing techniques, garbage collection and some other bits and pieces.

share|improve this answer
1  
That paper is good, but note it's for Lua 5.0 not 5.1. –  mlepage Aug 1 '12 at 2:35

The computational model underlying Lua is pretty much the same as the computational model underlying Scheme, except that the central data structure is not the cons cell; it's the mutable hash table. (At least until you get into metaprogramming with metatables.) Otherwise all the familiar stuff is there: nested first-class functions with mutable local variables (let-bound variables in Scheme), and so on.

It's not clear to me that you'd get much from a study of the VM. I did some hacking on the VM a while back and it's a lot like any other register-oriented VM, although maybe a bit cleaner. Only a handful of instructions are Lua-specific.

If you're curious about the metatables, the semantics is described clearly, if somewhat verbosely, in Section 2.8 of the reference manual for Lua 5.1. If you look at the VM code in src/lvm.c you'll see almost exactly that logic implemented in C (e.g., the internal Arith function). The VM instructions are specialized for the common cases, but it's all terribly straightforward; nothing clever is involved.

For years I've been wanting a more formal specification of Lua's computational model, but my tastes run more toward formal semantics...

share|improve this answer
    
I'm really curious about everything involving metatables. If they're not documented in the VM, where are they documented? –  anon May 5 '10 at 2:25
    
I've added some notes about metatables, but there's really not much to say. –  Norman Ramsey May 5 '10 at 13:43

Another great paper is The Implmentation of Lua 5.0, which describes design and motivations of various key systems in the VM. I found that reading it was a great way to parse and understand what I was seeing in the C code.

share|improve this answer

I am surprised you refer to the C source for the VM as this is protected by lua.org and the tecgraf/puc rio in Brazil specially as the language is used for real business and commercial applications in a number of countries. The paper about The Implementation of lua contains details about the VM in the most detail it is permitted to include but the structure of the VM is proprietary. It is worth noting that versions 5.0 and 5' were commissioned by IBM in Europe for use on customer mainframes and their register-based version have a VM which accepts the IBM defined format of intermediate instructions.

share|improve this answer
7  
The Lua VM source is free software and can be used freely. Your answer makes it sound like Lua is closed source with legal issues if included in some other project. Also please provide proof that IBM commissioned the Lua VM. –  Neopallium Aug 28 '11 at 4:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.