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There are a couple of different ways to remove HTML tags from an NSString in Cocoa.

One way is to render the string into an NSAttributedString and then grab the rendered text.

Another way is to use NSXMLDocument's -objectByApplyingXSLTString method to apply an XSLT transform that does it.

Unfortunately, the iPhone doesn't support NSAttributedString or NSXMLDocument. There are too many edge cases and malformed HTML documents for me to feel comfortable using regex or NSScanner. Does anyone have a solution to this?

One suggestion has been to simply look for opening and closing tag characters, this method won't work except for very trivial cases.

For example these cases (from the Perl Cookbook chapter on the same subject) would break this method:

<IMG SRC = "foo.gif" ALT = "A > B">

<!-- <A comment> -->

<script>if (a<b && a>c)</script>

<![INCLUDE CDATA [ >>>>>>>>>>>> ]]>
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You could add a bit of logic to take quotes and apostrophes into account... CDATA would take a bit more work, but the whole point of HTML is that unknown tags can be ignored by the parser; if you treat ALL tags as unknown, then you should just get raw text. –  Ben Gottlieb Nov 10 '08 at 17:44
    
I'd like to comment that a good (but basic) regular expression will definitely not break at your examples. Certainly not if you can guarantee well formed XHTML. I know that you said you can't, but I wonder why ;-) –  not really Jake Oct 9 '09 at 12:54
1  
There is Good answer for this question. Flatten HTML using Objective c –  vipintj Jul 9 '10 at 9:12
    
Unfortunately, using NSScanner is damn slow. –  steipete Mar 27 '11 at 15:56
    
Even more unfortunately, the linked NSScanner example only works for trivial html. It fails for every test case I mentioned in my post. –  lfalin Jan 2 '13 at 14:35

17 Answers 17

up vote 218 down vote accepted

A quick and "dirty" (removes everything between < and >) solution, works with iOS >= 3.2:

-(NSString *) stringByStrippingHTML {
  NSRange r;
  NSString *s = [[self copy] autorelease];
  while ((r = [s rangeOfString:@"<[^>]+>" options:NSRegularExpressionSearch]).location != NSNotFound)
    s = [s stringByReplacingCharactersInRange:r withString:@""];
  return s;
}

I have this declared as a category os NSString.

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2  
Super useful, thanks! –  Marky Mar 29 '11 at 20:21
4  
@James To use the method posted in the solution. You have to create a category for NSString. Look up "Objective-C Category" in Google. Then you add that method in the m file, and the prototype in the h file. When that is all set up, to use it all you have to do is have a string object (Example: NSString *myString = ...) and you call that method on your string object (NSString *strippedString = [myString stringByStrippingHTML];). –  Roberto May 2 '12 at 17:40
3  
+1 Great use for regular expressions, but does not cover lots of cases unfortunately. –  matm Jun 18 '12 at 14:53
2  
Quick and dirty indeed.... This function causes a huge memory leak in my application... Well, in its defence, I am using large amounts of data.... –  EZFrag Sep 9 '13 at 8:37
2  
In my App this solution caused performance problems. I switched to a solution with NSScanner instead NSRegularExpressionSearch. Now the performance problems are gone –  proca 2.0 Sep 13 '13 at 13:13

I would imagine the safest way would just be to parse for <>s, no? Loop through the entire string, and copy anything not enclosed in <>s to a new string.

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Take a look at NSXMLParser. It's a SAX-style parser. You should be able to use it to detect tags or other unwanted elements in the XML document and ignore them, capturing only pure text.

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Here's a blog post that discusses a couple of libraries available for stripping HTML http://sugarmaplesoftware.com/25/strip-html-tags/ Note the comments where others solutions are offered.

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This is the exact set of comments that I linked to in my question as an example of what would not work. –  lfalin Nov 14 '08 at 3:59

If you want to get the content without the html tags from the web page (HTML document) , then use this code inside the UIWebViewDidfinishLoading delegate method.

  NSString *myText = [webView stringByEvaluatingJavaScriptFromString:@"document.documentElement.textContent"];
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<br> is being replaced by nothing...which is undesirable. –  Nishant Sep 3 '13 at 23:03

This post was really helpful if you've already parsed an XML and don't want to parse the content again.

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If you are willing to use Three20 framework, it has a category on NSString that adds stringByRemovingHTMLTags method. See NSStringAdditions.h in Three20Core subproject.

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23  
For god's sake, don't use Three20 for anything. Most bloated and bad commented framework ever. –  kompozer Jan 20 '12 at 15:45

use this

NSString *HTMLTags = @"<[^>]*>"; //regex to remove any html tag

NSString *htmlString = @"<html>bla bla</html>";
NSString *stringWithoutHTML = [hstmString stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfRegex:myregex withString:@""];

don't forget to include this in your code : #import "RegexKitLite.h" here is the link to download this API : http://regexkit.sourceforge.net/#Downloads

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#import "RegexKitLite.h"

string text = [html stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfRegex:@"<[^>]+>" withString:@""]
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2  
HTML isn't a regular language so you shouldn't be trying to parse/strip it with a regular expression. stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  csaunders Dec 7 '11 at 18:34

This NSString category uses the NSXMLParser to accurately remove any HTML tags from an NSString. This is a single .m and .h file that can be included into your project easily.

http://codeilove.com/2011/09/ios-dev-strip-html-tags-from-nsstring.html

You then strip html by doing the following:

Import the header:

#import "NSString_stripHtml.h"

And then call stripHtml:

NSString* mystring = @"<b>Hello</b> World!!";
NSString* stripped = [mystring stripHtml];
// stripped will be = Hello World!!

This also works with malformed HTML that technically isn't XML.

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3  
Whilst the regular expression (as said by m.kocikowski) is quick and dirty, this is more robust. Example string: @"My test <span font=\"font>name\">html string". This answer returns: My test html string. Regular expression returns: My test name">html string. Whilst this isn't that common, it's just more robust. –  DonnaLea Sep 8 '11 at 6:29
1  
Except if you have a string like "S&P 500", it will strip everything after the ampersand and just return the string "S". –  Joshua Gross Sep 8 '13 at 22:12
    
The link is broken, try: gist.github.com/leighmcculloch/1202238 –  Samin Aug 24 at 3:07
    
@Samin thanks, I've updated the link. –  Leigh McCulloch Aug 25 at 16:24
    
& problem is fixed. –  Leigh McCulloch Sep 16 at 23:20

I've extended the answer by m.kocikowski and tried to make it a bit more efficient by using an NSMutableString. I've also structured it for use in a static Utils class (I know a Category is probably the best design though), and removed the autorelease so it compiles in an ARC project.

Included here in case anybody finds it useful.

.h

+ (NSString *)stringByStrippingHTML:(NSString *)inputString;

.m

+ (NSString *)stringByStrippingHTML:(NSString *)inputString 
{
  NSMutableString *outString;

  if (inputString)
  {
    outString = [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:inputString];

    if ([inputString length] > 0)
    {
      NSRange r;

      while ((r = [outString rangeOfString:@"<[^>]+>" options:NSRegularExpressionSearch]).location != NSNotFound)
      {
        [outString deleteCharactersInRange:r];
      }      
    }
  }

  return outString; 
}
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This method is useful but , if i need to non-strip some tag such as link <a> who i can update this method to fulfill this –  wod Mar 30 '13 at 8:06
    
@wod then just change the regex to <(?>/?)(?!a).+?> this will remove all tags excluding the opening <a> and closing </a> tags. –  Ashoor Jul 25 '13 at 20:48
UITextView *textview= [[UITextView alloc]initWithFrame:CGRectMake(10, 130, 250, 170)];
NSString *str = @"This is <font color='red'>simple</font>";
[textview setValue:str forKey:@"contentToHTMLString"];
textview.textAlignment = NSTextAlignmentLeft;
textview.editable = NO;
textview.font = [UIFont fontWithName:@"vardana" size:20.0];
[UIView addSubview:textview];

this is work fine for me

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This worked perfectly for me. Thanks manchikanti krishnakishore –  cybervedaa Jul 1 '13 at 0:43
    
Awesome +1.You got it. –  Ahsan Jan 5 at 21:01
    
I got encoding issue with this solution –  KIDdAe Sep 23 at 14:34

Extending this more from m.kocikowski's and Dan J's answers with more explanation for newbies

1# First you have to create objective-c-categories to make the code useable in any class.

.h

@interface NSString (NAME_OF_CATEGORY)

- (NSString *)stringByStrippingHTML;

@end

.m

@implementation NSString (NAME_OF_CATEGORY)

- (NSString *)stringByStrippingHTML
{
NSMutableString *outString;
NSString *inputString = self;

if (inputString)
{
    outString = [[NSMutableString alloc] initWithString:inputString];

    if ([inputString length] > 0)
    {
        NSRange r;

        while ((r = [outString rangeOfString:@"<[^>]+>" options:NSRegularExpressionSearch]).location != NSNotFound)
        {
            [outString deleteCharactersInRange:r];
        }
    }
}

return outString;
}

@end

2# Then just import the .h file of the category class you've just created e.g.

#import "NSString+NAME_OF_CATEGORY.h"

3# Calling the Method.

NSString* sub = [result stringByStrippingHTML];
NSLog(@"%@", sub);

result is NSString I want to strip the tags from.

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This is the modernization of m.kocikowski answer which removes whitespaces:

@implementation NSString (StripXMLTags)

- (NSString *)stripXMLTags
{
    NSRange r;
    NSString *s = [self copy];
    while ((r = [s rangeOfString:@"<[^>]+>\\s*" options:NSRegularExpressionSearch]).location != NSNotFound)
        s = [s stringByReplacingCharactersInRange:r withString:@""];
    return s;
}

@end
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You can use like below

-(void)myMethod
 {

 NSString* htmlStr = @"<some>html</string>";
 NSString* strWithoutFormatting = [self stringByStrippingHTML:htmlStr];

 }

 -(NSString *)stringByStrippingHTML:(NSString*)str
 {
   NSRange r;
   while ((r = [str rangeOfString:@"<[^>]+>" options:NSRegularExpressionSearch]).location     != NSNotFound)
  {
     str = [str stringByReplacingCharactersInRange:r withString:@""];
 }
  return str;
 }
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Here's a more efficient solution than the accepted answer:

- (NSString*)hp_stringByRemovingTags
{
    static NSRegularExpression *regex = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        regex = [NSRegularExpression regularExpressionWithPattern:@"<[^>]+>" options:kNilOptions error:nil];
    });

    // Use reverse enumerator to delete characters without affecting indexes
    NSArray *matches =[regex matchesInString:self options:kNilOptions range:NSMakeRange(0, self.length)];
    NSEnumerator *enumerator = matches.reverseObjectEnumerator;

    NSTextCheckingResult *match = nil;
    NSMutableString *modifiedString = self.mutableCopy;
    while ((match = [enumerator nextObject]))
    {
        [modifiedString deleteCharactersInRange:match.range];
    }
    return modifiedString;
}

The above NSString category uses a regular expression to find all the matching tags, makes a copy of the original string and finally removes all the tags in place by iterating over them in reverse order. It's more efficient because:

  • The regular expression is initialised only once.
  • A single copy of the original string is used.

This performed well enough for me but a solution using NSScanner might be more efficient.

Like the accepted answer, this solution doesn't address all the border cases requested by @lfalin. Those would be require much more expensive parsing which the average use case most likely doesn't need.

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Without a loop (at least on our side) :

- (NSString *)removeHTML {

    static NSRegularExpression *regexp;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        regexp = [NSRegularExpression regularExpressionWithPattern:@"<[^>]+>" options:kNilOptions error:nil];
    });

    return [regexp stringByReplacingMatchesInString:self
                                            options:kNilOptions
                                              range:NSMakeRange(0, self.length)
                                       withTemplate:@""];
}
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