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Can anyone suggest best way to avoid most if conditions? I have below code, I want avoid most of cases if conditions, how to do it ? any solution is great help;

if (adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease) {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine) {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setCredit(0d);
        } else {
            entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setDebit(0d);
        }
    } else {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setDebit(0d);
        } else {
            entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setCredit(0d);
        }
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine) {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setDebit(0d);
        } else {
            entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setCredit(0d);
        }
    } else {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setCredit(0d);
        } else {
            entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setDebit(0d);
        }
    }
}
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10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think this works. I basically generalised your boolean logic. Next time, try drawing some diagrams to help clear your mind.

Edit: I'd like to point out from the comments to this post, that the XOR solution provided by Marcelo and BlueRaja is identical in function.

/* This is to avoid a crazy 3-way switch. Generalised.
 * Instead of using a complicated if-else branch, we can use the number of true
 * and false to entail the intended action. */
/* This is the same as a ^ b ^ c (chained XOR), 
 * which is used to count the parity of truth values. */
int a = adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease ? 1 : 0;
int b = adjustment.increaseVATLine ? 1 : 0;
int c = adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType ? 1 : 0;

if ((a + b + c) % 2 == 1)
{
    entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);          // Odd number of trues
    entry2.setCredit(0d);
}
else
{
    entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);         // Even number of trues
    entry2.setDebit(0d);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
thanks Xavier Ho, your code helped. do u have any suggestion avoiding if conditions in most cases –  kumar kasimala May 5 '10 at 11:10
1  
I suggest you to read others' answers as well, as theirs are much more generalised than my answer, which was produced to solve your particular problem. Try to understand how boolean logic works, and see what you can do to simplify them. =] –  Xavier Ho May 5 '10 at 11:11
11  
Smart, but highly unreadable solution. This means hard to edit, maintain and understand. I will avoid writing that kind of "smart" code. –  kgiannakakis May 5 '10 at 12:28
    
If you think about it, though, it's really not anywhere "worse" than half the other solutions presented here. While your solution takes a completely different approach, I argue that mine is more robust, and more portable/modifiable. If I were OP, I would also provide the original code (commented out) for clarify on what's been generalised, with a number next to each case. I got them on my editor here, and that's how I come to this solution. –  Xavier Ho May 5 '10 at 13:03
3  
@XavierHo: (T^T)^F = F^F = F. (F^F)^T = F^T = T. (F^F)^F = F^F = F. Thus, in truth, the actual XOR and Outcome columns are exactly the same. Using XOR gives the correct result. As a side note, in basic electrical engineering (and cryptography!) classes, you use XOR gates to count the parity of bytes, which is exactly what both of our solutions do. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 5 '10 at 21:44

How to go about this... Let's extract a couple of methods, so we can better see the logic.

private void a() {
    entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
    entry2.setCredit(0d);
}
private void b() {
    entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
    entry2.setDebit(0d);
}

if (adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease) {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine) {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            a();
        } else {
            b();
        }
    } else {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            b();
        } else {
            a();
        }
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine) {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            b();
        } else {
            a();
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        a();
    } else {
        b();
    }
}

So now, looking at it, that first block

if (adjustment.increaseVATLine) {
    if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        a();
    } else {
        b();
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        b();
    } else {
        a();
    }
}

just amounts to doing a() if adjustment.increaseVATLine has the same value as adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType, b() otherwise. So we can reduce it:

if (adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease) {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine == adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        a();
    } else {
        b();
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine) {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            b();
        } else {
            a();
        }
    } else {
        if (adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
            a();
        } else {
            b();
        }
    }
}

And the remaining block is the same, just reversing a() and b():

if (adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease) {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine == adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        a();
    } else {
        b();
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine == adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        b();
    } else {
        a();
    }
}

So we begin to see the logic. If it's an increase, and the increaseVATLine matches the isSalesType, then we debit, otherwise credit, but if it's a decrease, then we credit only if they don't match. What's a good way of expressing this? Well, for one, name a() and b() smarter - now that we can see what they're doing

if (adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease) {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine == adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        debitEntry();
    } else {
        creditEntry();
    }
} else {
    if (adjustment.increaseVATLine == adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType) {
        creditEntry();
    } else {
        debitEntry();
    }
}

And now it's a little clearer still. Debit the account when it's an increase account and an increase VAT line, and a sales type, or when it's a decrease and either it's a decrease VAT line OR it's a sales type, but not both. Does this truth table help? First column is adjustmentAmount.isIncrease; second is adjustment.increaseVATLine; third is adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType. Fourth column is D for debit, C for credit; in parentheses are the number of TRUE values among the flags.

TTT -> D (3) 
TFF -> D (1) 
TTF -> C (2)
TFT -> C (2) 
FTT -> C (2) 
FFF -> C (0)
FTF -> D (1) 
FFT -> D (1)

Now you can see why @Xavier Ho's solution works; the odd totals are all debits, the even ones all credits.

This is just one exploratory path; I hope it's helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice explanation! –  BalusC May 5 '10 at 20:48
    
Agreed, Very Clear! –  Martin Smith May 5 '10 at 21:42
    
I'm glad someone actually worked out why my solutions works. +1. However I now feel the XOR solutions are way better. =]. –  Xavier Ho May 5 '10 at 23:23

I haven't thoroughly verified the logic, but this is the basic idea:

amt = adjustment.total
if (adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease
    ^ adjustment.increaseVATLine
    ^ adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType)
{
    amt = -amt;
}

entry2.setCredit(amt > 0 ? amt : 0);
entry2.setDebit(amt < 0 ? -amt : 0);

I should note that this logic is slightly different in that it correctly handles a negative value of adjustment.total, whereas the original seems to assume (perhaps correctly) that the value will always be non-negative.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Marcelo Cantos, your code helped. do u have any suggestion avoiding if conditions in most cases –  kumar kasimala May 5 '10 at 11:10
    
If I could give you a recipe, we wouldn't need programmers. In general, it's just a matter of practice and experience. Karnaugh maps can bring a certain degree of formality to the process, but I personally find it easier to manipulate the logic algebraically (e.g., the equation !(expr1 && expr2) = !expr1 || !expr2 can simplify a problem, depending on the nature of the expressions). Also, as in the above case, look for redundancy and try to remove it; again, there's no formal process for this that I am aware of, just practice and experience. –  Marcelo Cantos May 5 '10 at 21:53

You could use a truth table like this:

debit = ((isIncrease && increaseVATLine && !isSalesType) ||
         (isIncrease && !increaseVATLine && isSalesType) ||
         (!isIncrease && increaseVATLine && isSalesType) ||
         (!isIncrease && !increaseVATLine && !isSalesType)) ? 0 : adjustment.total;
entry2.setCredit(debit);

There are no ifs whatsoever and you can see easily in which cases the debit is 0. Same thing for the credit.

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To Martin Smith comment I'll add:

Remember, Karnaugh can help you to simplify the condition of that if.

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1  
Aha, K-map! Brings me back to the good old first year college days. +1 –  Xavier Ho May 5 '10 at 10:39
4  
Way to electrical engineer a solution! :-) –  Stephen C May 5 '10 at 10:43

Question has been answered, but I'll post there here for those who care for a cleaner solution:

//Set debit if exactly one or all three are true, else set credit
if(adjustment.adjustmentAccount.isIncrease ^ adjustment.increaseVATLine ^
   adjustment.vatItem.isSalesType)
{
    entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
    entry2.setCredit(0d);
}
else
{
    entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
    entry2.setDebit(0d);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed cleaner. –  Xavier Ho May 5 '10 at 21:49
5  
"cleaner" is obviously in the eye of the beholder. :) –  dash-tom-bang May 5 '10 at 21:51

It looks like you only have 2 cases so you could combine them with OR AND etc.

        if (<case1expression>) {
            entry2.setCredit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setDebit(0d);
        } else {
            entry2.setDebit(adjustment.total);
            entry2.setCredit(0d);
        }
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If you have conditional logic (e.g. do something if a condition is met), why would you want to even try and avoid them?

share|improve this answer
1  
There's a lot of repetition in the OP's code. –  Martin Smith May 5 '10 at 10:30
1  
Because there's a much simpler solution. –  Marcelo Cantos May 5 '10 at 10:32

What you usually can do to ease the situation to some extent is use inheritance.

If you for example have two classes Increase and NonIncrease that are subclasses of the same superclass you can have a method doSomething that does - well - something according to whatever class you currently have. You then do not have to check "if object is do X" but just call .doSomething() and it does whatever it is meant to do.

You can then go further and have more and more subclasses to further "refine" and "avoid more ifs".

There might be other possibilities (largely depending on your environment/requirements) like function pointers, delegates, the strategy pattern (GoF) or such constructs.

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4  
Way to over engineer a solution! –  Martin Smith May 5 '10 at 10:37
    
Oh yes, that reminds me: stackoverflow.com/questions/2101875/… –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 5 '10 at 21:04
    
Hmm - @BlueRaja: that seems a bit rude to me. If I remember correctly this is the first time I mention a design pattern on SO. And only because I am not smart enough to write clean code without help of much cleverer people. Maybe I should better not stick to the advide of mediocre programmers like Erich Gamma. –  scherand May 6 '10 at 5:53
1  
I agree that for the OPs case cleaning up the logic seems to do the trick. I think I got caught in the trap of Q&A vs. forum (i.e. answer the exact question vs. discuss a problem). Just out of curiosity: from the formulation of the OPs question ("avoid most if conditions"), how can you be sure she/he is not thinking in a much broader sense? That is by the way the reason I wrote "usually can do" and not "answer to your exact question is"... –  scherand May 6 '10 at 5:58

The best solution is to follow a design pattern. A State based design pattern defines a class per each state.

The state class then encapsulates what is the course of action for that particular state. This not only prevents a large junk of if -else statement mesh.

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1  
It avoids putting all of the if/else logic in one place by dispersing it through many classes! That's not a bonus in my book. (When in doubt, avoid following design patterns.) –  dash-tom-bang May 5 '10 at 21:50

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