Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I add a certain number of days to the current date in PHP?

I already got the current date with:

$today = date('y:m:d');

Just need to add x number of days to it

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 39 down vote accepted

php supports c style date functions. You can add or substract date-periods with english-language style phrases via the strtotime function. examples...

$Today=date('y:m:d');

// add 3 days to date
$NewDate=Date('y:m:d', strtotime("+3 days"));

// subtract 3 days from date
$NewDate=Date('y:m:d', strtotime("-3 days"));

// PHP returns last sunday's date
$NewDate=Date('y:m:d', strtotime("Last Sunday"));

// One week from last sunday
$NewDate=Date('y:m:d', strtotime("+7 days Last Sunday"));
share|improve this answer
    
using the strtotime() function is very expensive and would be massive overkill if you just want to add a couple of days. –  nickf Nov 10 '08 at 7:37
6  
Sounds like premature optimization. If it's not in a time-critical piece of code, and we have no reason to think it is, burning a few milliseconds is nothing compared to the cost of programmer time. –  Andy Lester Jul 30 '09 at 16:17

a day is 86400 seconds.

$tomorrow = date('y:m:d', time() + 86400);
share|improve this answer
    
Although, for readability reasons you shoudn't use the Integer everywhere as-is. define a const somewhere or use 60 * 60 * 24 so its clear what the number represents. –  Kent Fredric Nov 10 '08 at 8:07
    
i use 86400 so often that it's as obvious to me now as it is that there's 60 seconds in a minute :). If I am doing a lot of time functions, then yes, I'll often declare it a constant. –  nickf Nov 10 '08 at 14:03
8  
Not every day is 86400 seconds :) Day light savings... –  WayFarer Apr 5 '12 at 15:54

The date_add() function should do what you want. In addition, check out the docs (unofficial, but the official ones are a bit sparse) for the DateTime object, it's much nicer to work with than the procedural functions in PHP.

share|improve this answer

With php 5.3

    $date = new DateTime();
    $interval = new DateInterval('P1D');
    echo $date->format('Y-m-d') , PHP_EOL;
    $date->add($interval);
    echo $date->format('Y-m-d'), PHP_EOL;
    $date->add($interval);
    echo $date->format('Y-m-d'), PHP_EOL;

will output

2012-12-24

2012-12-25

2012-12-26

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.