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I have a problem that I’ve tried to get help for before, but I wasn’t able to solve it then, so I’m trying to simplify the problem now to see if I can get some more concrete help with this because it is driving me crazy…

Basically, I have a working (more complex) version of this application, which is a project cost calculator. But because I am at the same time trying to learn to design my applications better, I would like some input on how I could improve this design. Basically the main thing I want is input on the conditionals that (here) appear repeated in two places. The suggestions I got before was to use the strategy pattern or factory pattern. I also know about the Martin Fowler book with the suggestion to Refactor conditional with polymorphism. I understand that principle in his simpler example. But how can I do either of these things here (if any would be suitable)? The way I see it, the calculation is dependent on a couple of conditions: 1. What kind of service is it, writing or analysis? 2. Is the project small, medium or large? (Please note that there may be other parameters as well, equally different, such as “are the products new or previously existing?” So such parameters should be possible to add, but I tried to keep the example simple with only two parameters to be able to get concrete help)

So refactoring with polymorphism would imply creating a number of subclasses, which I already have for the first condition (type of service), and should I really create more subclasses for the second condition as well (size)? What would that become, AnalysisSmall, AnalysisMedium, AnalysisLarge, WritingSmall, etc…??? No, I know that’s not good, I just don’t see how to work with that pattern anyway else?

I see the same problem basically for the suggestions of using the strategy pattern (and the factory pattern as I see it would just be a helper to achieve the polymorphism above). So please, if anyone has concrete suggestions as to how to design these classes the best way I would be really grateful! Please also consider whether I have chosen the objects correctly too, or if they need to be redesigned. (Responses like "you should consider the factory pattern" will obviously not be helpful... I've already been down that road and I'm stumped at precisely how in this case)

Regards,

Anders

The code (very simplified, don’t mind the fact that I’m using strings instead of enums, not using a config file for data etc, that will be done as necessary in the real application once I get the hang of these design problems):

public abstract class Service
{
    protected Dictionary<string, int> _hours;
    protected const int SMALL = 2;
    protected const int MEDIUM = 8;

    public int NumberOfProducts { get; set; }
    public abstract int GetHours();
}

public class Writing : Service
{
    public Writing(int numberOfProducts)
    {
        NumberOfProducts = numberOfProducts;
        _hours = new Dictionary<string, int> { { "small", 125 }, { "medium", 100 }, { "large", 60 } };
    }

    public override int GetHours()
    {
        if (NumberOfProducts <= SMALL)
            return _hours["small"] * NumberOfProducts;
        if (NumberOfProducts <= MEDIUM)
            return (_hours["small"] * SMALL) + (_hours["medium"] * (NumberOfProducts - SMALL));
        return (_hours["small"] * SMALL) + (_hours["medium"] * (MEDIUM - SMALL))
            + (_hours["large"] * (NumberOfProducts - MEDIUM));
    }
}

public class Analysis : Service
{
    public Analysis(int numberOfProducts)
    {
        NumberOfProducts = numberOfProducts;
        _hours = new Dictionary<string, int> { { "small", 56 }, { "medium", 104 }, { "large", 200 } };
    }

    public override int GetHours()
    {
        if (NumberOfProducts <= SMALL)
            return _hours["small"];
        if (NumberOfProducts <= MEDIUM)
            return _hours["medium"];
        return _hours["large"];
    }
}

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        List<int> quantities = new List<int>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            quantities.Add(i);
        }
        comboBoxNumberOfProducts.DataSource = quantities;
    }

    private void comboBoxNumberOfProducts_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Service writing = new Writing((int) comboBoxNumberOfProducts.SelectedItem);
        Service analysis = new Analysis((int) comboBoxNumberOfProducts.SelectedItem);

        labelWriterHours.Text = writing.GetHours().ToString();
        labelAnalysisHours.Text = analysis.GetHours().ToString();
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your calculation there is a tight coupling between service type, service size and the number of products, it's very hard as it stands to separate them out into modular chunks to apply the strategy pattern.

If the calculation system is fixed, then it seems that the strategy pattern is not appropriate. If it isn't... Well, why not simplify the system?

For example, pull the base number of hours from the service size, and apply various discounts or increases depending on your other settings.

public class Service
{
    public IServiceSize serviceSize { internal get; set; }
    public IServiceBulkRate serviceBulkRate { internal get; set; }
    public IServiceType serviceType { internal get; set; }
    public int numberOfProducts { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="Service"/> class with default values
    /// </summary>
    public Service()
    {
        serviceSize = new SmallSize();
        serviceBulkRate = new FlatBulkRate();
        serviceType = new WritingService();
        numberOfProducts = 1;
    }

    public decimal CalculateHours()
    {
        decimal hours = serviceSize.GetBaseHours();
        hours = hours * serviceBulkRate.GetMultiplier(numberOfProducts);
        hours = hours * serviceType.GetMultiplier();

        return hours;
    }
}

public interface IServiceSize
{
    int GetBaseHours();
}

public class SmallSize : IServiceSize
{
    public int GetBaseHours()
    {
        return 125;
    }
}

public interface IServiceBulkRate
{
    decimal GetMultiplier(int numberOfProducts);
}

public class FlatBulkRate : IServiceBulkRate
{
    public decimal GetMultiplier(int numberOfProducts)
    {
        return numberOfProducts;
    }
}

public class StaggeredBulkRate : IServiceBulkRate
{
    public decimal GetMultiplier(int numberOfProducts)
    {
        if (numberOfProducts < 2)
            return numberOfProducts;
        else if (numberOfProducts >= 2 & numberOfProducts < 8)
            return numberOfProducts * 0.85m;
        else
            return numberOfProducts * 0.8m;
    }
}

public interface IServiceType
{
    decimal GetMultiplier();
}

public class WritingService : IServiceType
{
    public decimal GetMultiplier()
    {
        return 1.15m;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, another interesting answer, thanks. But I sort of think this ducks the problem, please correct me if I’m wrong - First of all, in the constructor you set ServiceSize = new SmallSize(), but that’s the problem – we can’t just set that in the constructor, the calling code would have to have an if statement for this (even if in a factory): if numberOfProducts <= 2 then ServiceSize = new SmallSize()… And then there’s the if statement left in the StaggeredBulkRate that checks for the same thing (<= 2 is the same as "small". It seems to me like we have two conditionals just like we started with? –  Anders Svensson May 5 '10 at 22:19
    
I do like the idea of turning the logic around with discount rates and so on though, I've been trying to come up with ideas for this myself, but haven't been able to get my head around it. I think the problem was that the spec detailed the problem like this and I got stuck in that thinking. Any more ideas for this would be welcome! –  Anders Svensson May 5 '10 at 22:21
    
Well, you still have two conditionals, but they are now in the right place, and they won't be repeated as new Service Types are added to the logic. –  Mark Withers May 6 '10 at 8:07

You could combine the factory and the strategy pattern. Your factory would then create a concrete service and pass it a strategy to handle the different sizes (small, medium or large).

This would give you 8 classes: Service, Analysis, Writing, MediumStrategy, SmallStrategy, LargeStrategy and ServiceFactory + the interface for the strategies.

The ServiceFactory would then contain the code to decide which strategy would be used. Something like:

Analysis createAnalysis(int numberOfProducts) {
    SizeStrategy strategy;
    if (numberOfProducts <= SMALL) {
        strategy = new SmallStrategy();
    } else if (numberOfProducts <= MEDIUM) {
        strategy = new MediumStrategy();
    } else {
        strategy = new LargeStrategy();
    }
    return new Analysis(numberOfProducts, strategy);
}

In this case you only save very little code though. As an exercise this doesn't matter of course, but I don't think I would waste my time refactoring this in practice.

EDIT: On second thought, assuming that the rules are likely to change, it seems to me that a control table is probably more appropriate than the OOP patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, but if you look at the GetHours method in Analysis and Writing, you see that they are different, so how could I just have one SmallStrategy and so on...? I would need one AnalysisSmallStrategy and one WritingSmallStrategy wouldn't I? Which would render it infeasible I think... Also, consider the parameter I said would enter, "IsNew", whether the products exist before or not. If IsNew then choose one config scale for hoursPerProduct... and so on, which would make it even more complicated. I agree I am tempted to leave conditionals and not bother. But gurus like Fowler tell me not to :-) –  Anders Svensson May 5 '10 at 12:32

I'd move the logic for choosing which value to calculate into the Service base class and delegate the actual calculations to each subclass:

public abstract class Service
{
    private readonly int numberOfProducts;
    private readonly IDictionary<string, int> hours;
    protected const int SMALL = 2; 
    protected const int MEDIUM = 8;

    public Service(int numberOfProducts, IDictionary<string, int> hours)
    {
        this.numberOfProducts = numberOfProducts;
        this.hours = hours;
    }

    public int GetHours()
    {
        if(this.numberOfProducts <= SMALL)
            return this.CalculateSmallHours(this.hours["small"], this.numberOfProducts);
        else if(this.numberOfProducts <= MEDIUM)
            return this.CalculateMediumHours(this.hours["medium"], this.numberOfProducts);
        else
            return this.CalculateLargeHours(this.hours["large"], this.numberOfProducts);
    }

    protected abstract int CalculateSmallHours(int hours, int numberOfProducts);
    protected abstract int CalculateMediumHours(int hours, int numberOfProducts);
    protected abstract int CalculateLargeHours(int hours, int numberOfProducts);
}

Then if any calculation is particularly complicated you could extract it into a strategy object and use it just for that specific subclass.

EDIT: If you want to support an arbitrary number of calculations, you could create a class to manage the mappings between hours 'categories' and a calculation for each one. Then each subclass (or some factory) can provide the relevant calculations for each category:

public class HoursCalculationStrategyCollection
{
    private readonly Dictionary<string, int> hours;

    private readonly Dictionary<string, Func<int, int, int>> strategies;

    public HoursCalculationStrategyCollection(IDictionary<string, int> hours)
    {
        this.hours = hours;
        this.strategies = new Dictionary<string, Func<int, int, int>();
    }

    public void AddCalculationStrategy(string hours, Func<int, int, int> strategy)
    {
        this.strategies[hours] = strategy;
    }

    public int CalculateHours(int numberOfProducts)
    {
        string hoursKey = null;

        if(numberOfProducts <= SMALL)
            hoursKey = small;
        else if(...)
            ...

        Func<int, int, int> strategy = this.strategies[hoursKey];
        return strategy(this.hours[hoursKey], numberOfProducts);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, it works as long as I move the initialization of the hours back into each subclass (the base class can't be passed this, since they differ for each subclass). However, this is a variant on a design I tried before (but reversed) where I had a project base class and 3 subclasses: SmallProject, MediumProject and LargeProject. And then I had GetWritingHours and GetAnalysisHours methods. So it worked the same way. But the problem is, it doesn't seem open to change. If I want to add another parameter value (in your example another size), say Xsmall and Xlarge, then I'd have to change (continued) –  Anders Svensson May 5 '10 at 13:03
    
(continued) the base class, as well as all subclasses to accomodate this, right? I may be off, but please clarify if I misunderstood. If this is in fact a situation where the repeated conditional if statements are in fact needed, anyone should feel free to tell me so too :-) I feel this should be possible to do more elegantly using patterns, but so far it just seems to complicate things, and not eliminate the need for updates in several places in case of a spec change (like the added methods mentioned above)... –  Anders Svensson May 5 '10 at 13:06
    
Ok... Very interesting, I don't really understand the Func part, is that lambda or Linq related? I would welcome an explanation of how this works, and how I would use this class from the subclasses (I guess)? But wow, this is getting complex. What I wanted was really to simplify the classes by not having to use repetitive checks for size etc. But I guess you're saying that the problem is more complicated than that, and the solution will therefore be complicated, so unless I really have a need for a design that's very open to change this might be overkill? –  Anders Svensson May 5 '10 at 14:40

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