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In the code below I have a function int GetTempString(char Query[]); calling it in main works fine.

However, when calling the function from a fork the fork hangs (stops running, no errors, no output) before this line: pch = strtok (Query," ,"); the printf shows that the pointer to pch is null. Again this only happens when the fork is executing it.

What am I doing doing wrong?

int main()
{
if((Timer =fork())==-1) printf("Timer Fork Failed");    
    else if(Timer==0)
    {
        while(1)
        {       
        sleep(2);       
        GetTempString("ch 1,2,3,4");        
        }
    }
    else
    {
         //CODE

         GetTempString("ch 1,2,3,4");
        }
}

int GetTempString(char Query[])
{
        char * pch;


    printf("DEBUG: '%s'-'%d'\n",Query,pch);

    pch = strtok (Query," ,");//* PROBLEM HERE*

        //while loop for strtok...

        return 1;

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

strtok modifies the string pointed to by its first argument (replacing delimiter characters with NULs), but you're passing in a string literal, which is implicitly const. You need to copy the string into a writable buffer before calling strtok.

With your example, this happens in both processes, so both will crash. When posting an abbreviated example to demonstrate a problem, be sure to compile and test it first to make sure it actually shows the problem you're having and not some completely unrelated problem (which may be the case here).

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Point noted, thanks –  Luke Mcneice May 5 '10 at 19:32

TempString variable is allocated on GetTempString function's stack. Using this variable makes sens only inside the context of GetTempString. Use static TempString[50] in order to solve this problem.

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the local was removed, the behaviour is still the same –  Luke Mcneice May 5 '10 at 16:20

Your function is returning a local variable, so you have undefined behaviour - anything could happen after that. You need to allocate the string you are returning dynamically using malloc(), or pass it to the function as a parameter.

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I removed the local variable and it has the same behaviour. the function call on the main wasn't actually being called like demonstrated, I wished only to convey that it did work. Therefore the first time it is called is by the fork. –  Luke Mcneice May 5 '10 at 15:57

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