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I have been using Snippet Compiler for a few years, and it's great. Unfortunately, it isn't getting maintained, and is falling behind. Doesn't support .NET 4, which we recently switched to, and even some C# 3 features like extension methods get flagged as errors (though they do compile).

Alternatives?

Update: I wanted to post back here after having spent a lot of time with LINQPad since writing this question. It is now one of my critical tools. Here's why:

  • It loads fast. Start typing right away. F5 and see the results.
  • It lets you write simple expressions, statements, or full programs. This gives me a lot of flexibility for the kind of testing I want to do. I'll usually start with Expression, move to Statement, and then sometimes switch to Program if I start writing methods and types.
  • It directly talks to databases and will generate simple starter queries and types for you (like "MyTable.Take(50)" and wire up all the db access and everything). Way faster than doing the same thing in SQL Studio or VS.
  • You can point it at your own assemblies. So I'll be in VS and want to test out some function or class I wrote. I'll hit F4, map in the assembly, import a namespace or two, and go.
    • I'll often save that .linq file off for later as a "Foo Environment" (where Foo is the name of the assembly).
    • LINQPad even lets you set these as defaults. So I have a couple core libraries with helper functions etc that I always want to be available in my test snippets and expressions, so I've set those to be by default included (and the necessary namespaces) in all fresh queries by default.
  • Dude that wrote it is smart. He realized we'd be doing fast iteration on code, so it will (optionally, and on by default) reload the app domain every time.
    • This means you can build your assembly, go back to LINQPad and hit F5 and it will use the new one. No locks maintained, automatic switching to new versions.
    • This might be the key feature of LINQPad and it has completely stopped me from using Powershell ISE for this kind of thing. I hope one day to see a LINQShell!
  • It has really good Intellisense if you pay the upgrade. It doesn't seem like a critical feature but once you have it you will understand why it was worth the upgrade. Discoverability is important when doing fast little scripty things.
  • It's great for demoing code functionality to other people, especially in a lecture type environment. I don't demo in VS any more.
  • The "Dump" that you can tack onto every expression is totally awesome. Very sophisticated, configurable reports that use reflection to look deeply inside objects and streams. Do not use Console.WriteLine, use Dump. It's an object extension method.
  • LINQPad is useable from Visual Studio for debugging visualization. You can add a reference to LINQPad from your app to Dump() any expression to HTML (yes, in the watch window!), then use the HTML visualizer in VS to show the nicely formatted expression in a popup, just as if it were in LINQPad.
    • Note that there's a VS addin that supposedly does this automatically for you but I never got it to work reliably. I stick with the manual method that always works.
  • It's well-maintained. It had 4.0 support early and currently supports the Async CTP. Not that I use async yet, just happened to notice.

The only thing I can think of that's missing is a way of calling LINQPad from the command line to execute .linq files as scripts and gather the results in a machine readable form. We have a hack someone wrote here that they're using to automate some queries or something, but it would be great if LINQPad supported automation directly. Well, here's another request for a LINQShell!

Anyway, I use this tool multiple times every day as you might gather from my love letter above. I suggest you at least check it out, the free version is insanely feature-filled. But then pay the man, it's cheap and will support this awesome project.

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Mar 12 '13 at 11:44

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Unfortunately, It seems to be hard to make LinqPad worked with MYSQL –  JatSing Nov 23 '11 at 1:40
    
Oh, I ended up back here and saw your "sales pitch" for LinqPad :) I'm glad I made another addict :) Not sure if you know this already, but if you want to make feature requests, there's a uservoice site: linqpad.uservoice.com –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 1 '11 at 9:33
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There is also .NET Fiddle (http://dotnetfiddle.net) which is similar to LinqPad, but online. It currently supports C#, VB.NET, F#, ASP.NET MVC, NuGet Packages, Console.ReadLine, Intellisense, Sharing, Collaboration, Dump() and other features. –  Eric P Mar 15 at 11:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 55 down vote accepted

I use LINQPad to try out small snippets of code. Even though its original purpose is database querying, it works great as a general C# snippet runner. Oh, and you gotta love the pretty output you get with the Dump extension method.

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+1 LINQPad is great and there is a beta available (I think it's still in beta) that supports 4.0 –  Chris Dunaway May 5 '10 at 17:11
    
I tried this, looks like it solves the 95% case for me. Thanks. –  scobi May 5 '10 at 17:11
    
so far it's nice. will keep this in place of Snippet Compiler. :) –  Ace Mark Nov 16 '12 at 6:14

CS-Script

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No 4.0 support yet, but I'll keep my eye on this one, looks good. –  scobi May 5 '10 at 17:00
    
Thanks for the link. I will try it out. –  Raj Kaimal May 5 '10 at 17:13
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.NET 4.0 is supported in v2.7.0: csscript.net/help/What_is_new.html –  Kyle Alons May 5 '10 at 17:19

Try out ideone.com

Ideone is something more than a pastebin; it's an online compiler and debugging tool which allows to compile and run code online in more than 40 programming languages.

Or

Try out programr.com

Programr.com can compile and run, from your browser, almost any language (C++, java, C#, VB, PHP, Ruby, Python) etc snippets or full apps.

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To be honest, it's almost unbelievable. –  David d C e Freitas Apr 11 '12 at 13:48
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for snippits just open another users public C# app and paste in your code, compile and run, no need to create an account/project etc. Of course if you want to save anything then you need an account. –  rob Jun 21 '12 at 10:11

SharpDevelop (#Develop) is my favorite for playing around with C#, WPF or even ASP.NET. It's actually a free lightweight Visual Studio alternative (with intellisense, full debug support, console applications, windows forms, WPF, silverlight, asp.net, mvc), but is only 16 MB, and it launches and runs code very fast.

However, for testing your snippets you have to create a new solution the same way as in VS, but I have created a single temporary C# console application solution "TempConsole" in my temp folder, which is always easily accessible whenever I need to test my snippets.

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"TempConsole", this is very clever! –  fonzo-highway Nov 14 '13 at 10:24

Few more web-based compilers/interpreters (Perhaps missing from above list) are as under.

http://repl.it https://www.sourcelair.com/

Due to insufficient reputations i cant post below links. writecodeonline & compileonline &

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I have been looking for one too. The closest I could find was this:

http://code.google.com/p/sharpsnippetcompiler/

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1  
Unfortunately this doesn't support 4.0 either. It also crashes when I type in a simple script and run it. –  scobi May 5 '10 at 17:00

Here's an interesting option: Mono's CsharpRepl interactive C# shell.

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