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i want to do this: reads the words in the file one at a time. (Use a string to do this) Counts three things: how many single-character words are in the file, how many short (2 to 5 characters) words are in the file, and how many long (6 or more characters) words are in the file. HELP HERE

im not sure on how about reading file into a string. i know i have to something like this but i dont understand the rest. HELP HERE

ifstream infile;
//char mystring[6];
//char mystring[20];

 int main()
    {
        infile.open("file.txt");
            if(infile.fail())
            {
                cout << " Error " << endl;
            }

        int numb_char=0;
        char letter;

                while(!infile.eof())
                {
                    infile.get(letter);
                    cout << letter;
                    numb_char++;
                    break;
                }

    cout << " the number of characters is :" << numb_char << endl;
    infile.close(); 
    return 0;
share|improve this question
    
I can't even figure out what it is you're trying to do with that code. It will read one character then exit. Maybe you could edit your question with what you're trying to do? –  Brian Roach May 5 '10 at 18:03
    
well i thought thats how you read one word at a time and tall up the number of 5 letter words and 6 or more letter words. all my input says is the number of characters is : 1. so i all i know is that is incorrect and im lost kind of . is this the right i guess format for me to accomplish this goal –  user320950 May 5 '10 at 18:41
1  
Also, what characters delimit a word? Spaces only? –  Mark B May 5 '10 at 19:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not quite sure where to start...

Your loop:

while(!infile.eof())
{
  infile.get(letter);
  cout << letter;
  numb_char++;
  break;
}

Would only execute once due to the extra break;

Also this code looks like it is trying to read the number of characters in a file, and not count up the number of words that are 5 letters or greater than 6 letters.

Try something like:

ifstream infile;

int main(){
  infile.open("file.txt");
  if(!infile.good()){
    cout << " Error " << endl;
    return 1;
  }
  int shortCount = 0;
  int mediumCount = 0;
  int longCount = 0;
  int charCount = 0;
  char letter;
  while(!infile.eof()){
    infile >> letter;
    if(letter == ' ' || char == EOF){ // end of word or file.
      if(charCount == 1)
        shortCount++;
      else if(charCount < 6)
        mediumCount++;
      else
        longCount++;
      charCount = 0;
    }else{
      charCount++;
    }
  }
  cout << "Short Words: " << shortCount << endl;
  cout << "Medium Words: " << mediumWords << endl;
  cout << "Long Words: " << longWords << endl;
  infile.close();
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
so how would u count the number of words then. –  user320950 May 5 '10 at 18:43
    
ok i got it man it just wasnt clicking i kept looking at it and looking at it for some reason and thats what i needed a way to count the short words and long words. i didnt know you could do this == if(letter == ' ' || char == EOF). thanks –  user320950 May 6 '10 at 1:08

Could be a Unicode issue, you might want to check the encoding of the file, if it is Unicode you will need to use the appropriate methods wfstream, and types wchar_t. Unicode is becoming increasingly common and I would not be surprised if that was the source of your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
well my output statement says the number of characters is: 1 and i know that it is not right and i am counting characters in a file not counting the number of words that are less than 5 and that are 6 or greater which is what i wanted to do but i was wrong –  user320950 May 5 '10 at 18:48
    
Unicode is definitely not the problem here. See other answers for the various issues with the code. –  Bill May 5 '10 at 21:03
#include <cctype>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

string s;
vector< int > word_length_histogram;

while ( cin >> s ) // attempt to get a word and stop loop upon failure
{
    while ( ispunct( * --s.end() ) ) s.erase( --s.end() ); // strip punctuation

    if ( s.size() >= word_length_histogram.size() ) {
        word_length_histogram.resize( s.size() + 1 );
    } // make sure there's room in the histogram

    ++ word_length_histogram[ s.size() ];
}

At the end, word_length_histogram[1] has the number of 1-character words, word_length_histogram[2] has the number of 2-character words, etc. Add up the contents of ranges within word_length_histogram to get the particular statistics you want.

share|improve this answer
    
wat about gcount or istream& get ( char& c ) or istream& get (char* s, streamsize n ) to do this program –  user320950 May 5 '10 at 21:33
    
@user: what about them? This program is quite short. The only way to make it more elegant would be to use map<int,int> for the histogram. (That would make it more difficult to iterate over selected ranges, though.) The right tool for the right job. –  Potatoswatter May 5 '10 at 21:48

As I mentioned ... you're reading a single character then breaking out of your loop ... don't break.

As for how to do this ... one approach would be to define 3 counters, int fiveMinusLetterWord,int sixPlusLetterWord, and int singleLetterWord. Count characters until letter == ' '. When you hit space, see how many characters you've read - that's the length of the previous word. Increment one of your counters if needed, reset your character counter, and proceed untl the end of the file. Remember to check the length of the last word after the loops exits. You also are going to have to deal with end-of-line delimiters since you're reading a single character at a time.

An easier approach since this is C++ would be to use istream& getline ( istream& is, string& str ); from <string> and read line by line into a std::string then use the std::string functions to find your words.

EDIT: I missed the part in your question that says "read in one word at a time". Look at the other answer, you can read a single word from a stream using a std::string.

share|improve this answer
vector<string> words;
int cLength = 0;
long shortWords, medWords, longWords;

boost::algorithm::split(inputString, is_any_of(" .,-_=+;()[]\\/ [etc]"), words, token_compress_on);
for ( unsigned long i = 0; i < words.size(); i++ )
{
    cLength = words[i].size();
    if ( cLength < 2 ) // short word
    {
        shortWords++;
    } else if ( cLength < 6 ) {
        medWords++;
    } else {
        longWords++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
wats a way of doing it without using vectors –  user320950 May 5 '10 at 21:46
    
To do it without vectors, you'd need some kind of loop. If I can come up with something, I'll append it to my answer. There aren't many reasons not to use vectors though, not in C++. They're part of the standard library and make this sort of thing very simple to do. –  ssube May 6 '10 at 2:45

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