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What is the most efficient for speed algorithm to solve the following problem?

Given 6 arrays, D1,D2,D3,D4,D5 and D6 each containing 6 numbers like:

D1[0] = number              D2[0] = number      ......       D6[0] = number
D1[1] = another number      D2[1] = another number           ....
.....                       ....                ......       ....
D1[5] = yet another number  ....                ......       ....

Given a second array ST1, containing 1 number:

ST1[0] = 6

Given a third array ans, containing 6 numbers:

ans[0] = 3, ans[1] = 4, ans[2] = 5, ......ans[5] = 8

Using as index for the arrays D1,D2,D3,D4,D5 and D6, the number that goes from 0, to the number stored in ST1[0] minus one, in this example 6, so from 0 to 6-1, compare the ans array against each D array. The result should be 0 if one or more ans numbers are not found in any D at the same index and should be 1 if all ans numbers are found in some D at the same index. That is, return 0 if some ans[i] doesn't equal any DN[i] and return 1 if every ans[i] equals some DN[i].

My algorithm so far is:
I tried to keep everything unlooped as much as possible.

EML  := ST1[0]   //number contained in ST1[0]   
EML1 := 0        //start index for the arrays D 

While EML1 < EML
   if D1[ELM1] = ans[0] 
     goto two
   if D2[ELM1] = ans[0] 
     goto two
   if D3[ELM1] = ans[0] 
     goto two
   if D4[ELM1] = ans[0] 
     goto two
   if D5[ELM1] = ans[0] 
     goto two
   if D6[ELM1] = ans[0] 
     goto two

   ELM1 = ELM1 + 1

return 0     //If the ans[0] number is not found in either D1[0-6], D2[0-6].... D6[0-6] return 0 which will then exclude ans[0-6] numbers


two:

EML1 := 0      start index for arrays Ds 
While EML1 < EML
   if D1[ELM1] = ans[1] 
     goto three
   if D2[ELM1] = ans[1] 
     goto three
   if D3[ELM1] = ans[1] 
     goto three
   if D4[ELM1] = ans[1] 
     goto three
   if D5[ELM1] = ans[1] 
     goto three
   if D6[ELM1] = ans[1] 
     goto three
   ELM1 = ELM1 + 1

return 0    //If the ans[1] number is not found in either D1[0-6], D2[0-6]....  D6[0-6]  return 0 which will then exclude ans[0-6] numbers

three:

EML1 := 0      start index for arrays Ds 

While EML1 < EML
   if D1[ELM1] = ans[2] 
     goto four
   if D2[ELM1] = ans[2] 
     goto four
   if D3[ELM1] = ans[2] 
     goto four
   if D4[ELM1] = ans[2] 
     goto four
   if D5[ELM1] = ans[2] 
     goto four
   if D6[ELM1] = ans[2] 
     goto four
   ELM1 = ELM1 + 1

return 0   //If the ans[2] number is not found in either D1[0-6], D2[0-6]....  D6[0-6]  return 0 which will then exclude ans[0-6] numbers

four:

EML1 := 0      start index for arrays Ds 

While EML1 < EML
   if D1[ELM1] = ans[3] 
     goto five
   if D2[ELM1] = ans[3] 
     goto five
   if D3[ELM1] = ans[3] 
     goto five
   if D4[ELM1] = ans[3] 
     goto five
   if D5[ELM1] = ans[3] 
     goto five
   if D6[ELM1] = ans[3] 
     goto five
   ELM1 = ELM1 + 1

return 0 //If the ans[3] number is not found in either D1[0-6], D2[0-6]....  D6[0-6]  return 0 which will then exclude ans[0-6] numbers


five:

EML1 := 0      start index for arrays Ds 

While EML1 < EML
   if D1[ELM1] = ans[4] 
     goto six
   if D2[ELM1] = ans[4] 
     goto six
   if D3[ELM1] = ans[4] 
     goto six
   if D4[ELM1] = ans[4] 
     goto six
   if D5[ELM1] = ans[4] 
     goto six
   if D6[ELM1] = ans[4] 
     goto six
   ELM1 = ELM1 + 1

return 0  //If the ans[4] number is not found in either D1[0-6], D2[0-6]....  D6[0-6]  return 0 which will then exclude ans[0-6] numbers

six:

EML1 := 0      start index for arrays Ds 

While EML1 < EML
   if D1[ELM1] = ans[5] 
     return 1            ////If the ans[1] number is not found in either D1[0-6].....  
   if D2[ELM1] = ans[5]      return 1 which will then include ans[0-6] numbers
     return 1
   if D3[ELM1] = ans[5] 
     return 1
   if D4[ELM1] = ans[5] 
     return 1
   if D5[ELM1] = ans[5] 
     return 1
   if D6[ELM1] = ans[5] 
     return 1
   ELM1 = ELM1 + 1

return 0 

As language of choice, it would be pure c

share|improve this question
13  
I think your programming skills are very basic. It's very likely that what you want to do can be done much easier. Please write more about what you want to do with this code (what do the arrays represent and which information do you want to extract from them), this might clarify things and lead to more answers. –  schnaader May 5 '10 at 18:38
17  
Oh come on guys. For a first time user, he has clearly put a lot of effort in trying to format and phrase his question as good as possible. +1 –  Lieven Keersmaekers May 5 '10 at 19:03
3  
Agree with Lieven... Even for beginners, we don't want anyone to feel uncomfortable about asking a question, especially a legit one even if educational / learning. How else does someone get to become a stronger developer without having real-world developers to network with. –  DRapp May 5 '10 at 19:14
7  
@mark: I'd like to apologize for the way that the Stackoverflow's police dept. has treated you. –  Tom May 5 '10 at 19:43
2  
Could you explain what you want more? In the algorithm you give, I think only the first two loops can ever run, because in all of the loops, either the loop will end and the code will return, or the loop will hit a goto two and will go to the second one. Also, when you say "compare each res array against each D array", what should the program do with the comparisons? Do you want to print a series of strings "greater", "less than", etc., or do you want to quit if you hit numbers that are equal, or something else? –  Noah Lavine May 5 '10 at 20:56

4 Answers 4

I did a direct trivial C implementation of the algorithm provided by the original poster. It is here

As other proposed the first thing to do is to roll up the code. Unrolling is not really good for speed as it lead to code cache misses. I began by rolling inner loops and got this. Then I rolled the outer loop and removed the now useless gotos and got code below.

EDIT: I changed several time the C code because even as simple as it is there seems to be problems when JIT compiling or executing it with CUDA (and CUDA seems not to be very verbose about errors). That is why the piece of code below use globals... and that is just trivial implementation. We are not yet going for speed. It says much about premature optimization. Why bother to make it fast if we can't even make it work ? I guess there is still issues as CUDA seems to impose many restrictions on the code you can make work if I believe the Wikipedia article. Also maybe we should use float instead of int ?

#include <stdio.h>

int D1[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
int D2[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
int D3[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
int D4[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
int D5[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
int D6[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9};
int ST1[1] = {6};
int ans[6] = {1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9};
int * D[6] = { D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6 };

/* beware D is passed through globals */
int algo(int * ans, int ELM){
    int a, e, p;

    for (a = 0 ; a < 6 ; a++){ 
        for (e = 0 ; e < ELM ; e++){
            for (p = 0 ; p < 6 ; p++){
                if (D[p][e] == ans[a]){
                    goto cont;
                }
            }
        }
        return 0; //bad row of numbers found
    cont:;
    }
    return 1;
}

int main(){
    int res;
    res = algo(ans, ST1[0]);
    printf("algo returned %d\n", res);
}

Now that is interesting, because we can understand what code is doing. By the way doing this packing job I corrected several oddities in the original question. I believe it was typos as it wasn't logical at all in the global context. - goto always jump to two (it should have progressed) - the last test checked ans[0] instead of ans[5]

please Mark, correct me if I'm wrong in the above asumptions on what the original code should do and your original algorithm is typo free.

What the code is doing it for each value in ans check it is present in a two dimentional array. If any number miss it returns 0. If all numbers are found it returns 1.

What I would do to get a real fast code is not to implement it in C but in another language like python (or C++) where set is a basic data structure provided by standard libraries. Then I would build a set with all the values of the arrays (that is O(n)) and check if numbers searched are present in set or not (that is O(1)). The final implementation should be faster than the existing code at least from an algorithmic point of view.

Python example is below as it is really trivial (print true/false instead of 1/0 but you get the idea):

ans_set = set(ans)
print len(set(D1+D2+D3+D4+D5+D6).intersection(ans_set)) == len(ans_set)

Here is a possible C++ implementation using sets:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>

int algo(int * D1, int * D2, int * D3, int * D4, int * D5, int * D6, int * ans, int ELM){
    int e, p;
    int * D[6] = { D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6 };
    std::set<int> ans_set(ans, ans+6);

    int lg = ans_set.size();

    for (e = 0 ; e < ELM ; e++){
        for (p = 0 ; p < 6 ; p++){
            if (0 == (lg -= ans_set.erase(D[p][e]))){
                // we found all elements of ans_set
                return 1;
            }
        }
    }
    return 0; // some items in ans are missing
}

int main(){
    int D1[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
    int D2[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
    int D3[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
    int D4[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
    int D5[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
    int D6[6] = {3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1};

    int ST1[1] = {6};

    int ans[] = {1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};

    int res = algo(D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6, ans, ST1[0]);
    std::cout << "algo returned " << res << "\n";
}

We make some performance hypothesis : the content of ans should be sorted or we should construct it otherwise, we suppose that content of D1..D6 will change between calls to algo. Hence we do not bother constructing a set for it (as set construction is O(n) anyway we wouldn't gain anything if D1..D6 are changing). But if we call several times algo with the same D1..D6 and that is ans that change we should do the opposite and transform D1..D6 into one larger set that we keep available.

If I stick to C I could do it as follow:

  • copy all numbers in D1.. D6 in one unique array (using memcpy for each row)
  • sort content of this array
  • use a dichotomic search to check if number if available

As data size are really small here , we could also try going for micro optimizations. It could pay better here. Don't know for sure.

EDIT2: there is hard restrictions on the subset of C supported by CUDA. The most restrictive one is that we shouldn't use pointers to main memory. That will have to be taken into account. It explains why the current code does not work. The simplest change is probably to call it for every array D1..D6 in turn. To keep it short and avoid function call cost we may use a macro or an inline function. I will post a proposal.

share|improve this answer
    
I corrected it yes was a typo it should have been [5] –  Mark May 5 '10 at 22:46
    
I am not very familiar with C++, so I do not understand "where set is a basic data structure provided by standard libraries. Then I would build a set with all the values of the arrays (that is O(n)) and check if numbers searched are present in set or not (that is O(1))." –  Mark May 5 '10 at 22:47
    
@Mark: I will post the python solution now as it is a piece of cake. It will give you the idea, the C++ one is not much more complicated. C would need more work if we do not have a set library immediately available (a library that implement the concept of set). –  kriss May 5 '10 at 22:54
    
@Mark: OK, I got in comments you want to do it in CUDA. It clarify the context. C++ set could be interesting to try as you have a C++ compiler available. Say us if it is faster or slower than current C code, there is other possibilities not yet tried (like micro optimizing to avoid jumps). –  kriss May 5 '10 at 23:24
    
yes I'm trying right now, I'll let you know –  Mark May 5 '10 at 23:28

I was a little bit confused by your question, but I think I have it enough to help you get started.

#define ROW 6
#define COL 6

int D[ROW][COL]; // This is all of your D arrays in one 2 dimensional array.

Next you should probably use nested for loops. Each loop will correspond to a dimension of D. Remember that the order of your indexes matters. The easiest way to keep it straight in C is to remember that D[i] is a valid expression even when D has more than one dimension (and would evaluate to a pointer to a row : a sub array).

If you can't change the independent D arrays to one multidimensional array you could easily make a pointer array whose members point to the heads of each of those arrays and achieve the same effect.

Then you can use the break statement to break out of the inner loop after you have determined that the current D[i] doesn't match the ans.

share|improve this answer
    
well I do not want to use 2 dimension array, I need to have 6 different array, and possible as unlooped as possible –  Mark May 5 '10 at 19:42
    
What I am interested is to speed up, that code, which I put in algorithm form, and it has to be with 1 dimension arrays –  Mark May 5 '10 at 20:29
    
If you compiled it with a compiler that was capable of loop unrolling with that optimization turned on then it would likely result in something similar to what you were trying to achieve with gotos without upsetting your instructor. –  nategoose May 5 '10 at 20:59
1  
@mark: also gotos have another effect than upsetting instructors, they empty processor pipe-lines (that's true of any jump, so in this regard loops are no better). But whenever you can express your program without using any kind of goto/branch/jump even if you execute more instructions than strictly necessary you speedup things. I believe there is a track to follow there (will give it a try). –  kriss May 5 '10 at 21:21
    
Well I tried not to use goto and use bool variables and break, but it did not work, and besides that means more memory. Is goto real a problem in programming or is it a matter of form? –  Mark May 5 '10 at 21:25

With only 36 values to compare, the most efficient approach would be to not use CUDA at all.

Just use a CPU loop.

If you change your inputs, I'll change my answer.

share|improve this answer
    
No that was just an example, but there are many more to compare –  Mark Jun 3 '10 at 21:44
    
Do you want a single bool answer or an array of answer per element? –  Danny Varod Jun 9 '10 at 22:21
    
I gave up on that, now I'm working on another project stackoverflow.com/questions/3017591/… –  Mark Jun 10 '10 at 19:05

In case the range of the numbers is limited, it would be probably easier to make a bit array, like this:

int IsPresent(int arrays[][6], int ans[6], int ST1)
{
    uint32_t bit_mask = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++ i) {
        for(int j = 0; j < ST1; ++ j) {
            assert(arrays[i][j] >= 0 && arrays[i][j] < 32); // range is limited
            bit_mask |= 1 << arrays[i][j];
        }
    }
    // make a "list" of numbers that we have

    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++ i) {
        if(((bit_mask >> ans[i]) & 1) == 0)
            return 0; // in ans, there is a number that is not present in arrays
    }
    return 1; // all of the numbers were found
}

This will always run in O(6 * ST1 + 6). Now this has the disadvantage of first going through up to 36 arrays and then checking against six values. If there is a strong precondition that the numbers will be mostly present, it is possible to reverse the test and provide an early exit:

int IsPresent(int arrays[][6], int ans[6], int ST1)
{
    uint32_t bit_mask = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++ i) {
        assert(ans[i][j] >= 0 && ans[i][j] < 32); // range is limited
        bit_mask |= 1 << ans[i];
    }
    // make a "list" of numbers that we need to find

    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++ i) {
        for(int j = 0; j < ST1; ++ j)
            bit_mask &= ~(1 << arrays[i][j]); // clear bits of the mask

        if(!bit_mask) // check if we have them all
            return 1; // all of the numbers were found
    }

    assert(bit_mask != 0);
    return 0; // there are some numbers remaining yet to be found
}

This will run at most in O(6 * ST1 + 6), at best in O(6 + 1) if the first number in the first array covers all of ans (and ans is six times the same number). Note that the test for bit mask being zero can be either after each array (as it is now) or after each element (that way involves more checking but also earlier cutoff when all the numbers are found). In context of CUDA, the first version of the algorithm would likely be faster, as it involves fewer branches and most of the loops (except the one for ST1) can be automatically unrolled.

However, if the range of the numbers is unlimited, we could do something else. Since there are only up to 7 * 6 = 42 different numbers in ans and all the arrays, it would be possible to map those to 42 different numbers and use a 64-bit integer for a bit mask. But arguably this mapping of numbers to integers would already be enough for the test and it would be possible to skip this test altogether.

Another way to do it would be to sort the arrays and simply count coverage of the individual numbers:

int IsPresent(int arrays[][6], int ans[6], int ST1)
{
    int all_numbers[36], n = ST1 * 6;
    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++ i)
        memcpy(&all_numbers[i * ST1], &arrays[i], ST1 * sizeof(int));
    // copy all of the numbers into a contiguous array

    std::sort(all_numbers, all_numbers + n);
    // or use "C" standard library qsort() or a bitonic sorting network on GPU
    // alternatively, sort each array of 6 separately and then merge the sorted
    // arrays (can also be done in parallel, to some level)

    n = std::unique(all_numbers, all_numbers + n) - all_numbers;
    // this way, we can also remove duplicate numbers, if they are
    // expect to occur frequently and make the next test faster.
    // std::unique() actually moves the duplicates to the end of the list
    // and returns an iterator (a pointer in this case) to one past
    // the last unique element of the list - that gives us number of
    // unique items.

    for(int i = 0; i < 6; ++ i) {
        int *p = std::lower_bound(all_numbers, all_numbers + n, ans[i]);
        // use binary search to find the number in question
        // or use "C" standard library bfind()
        // or implement binary search yourself on GPU

        if(p == all_numbers + n)
            return 0; // not found
        // alternately, make all_numbers array of 37 and write
        // all_numbers[n] = -1; before this loop. that will act
        // as a sentinel and will save this one comparison (assuming
        // that there is a value that is guaranteed not to occur in ans)

        if(*p != ans[i])
            return 0; // another number found, not ans[i]
        // std::lower_bound looks for the given number, or for one that
        // is greater than it, so if the number was to be inserted there
        // (before the bigger one), the sequence would remain ordered.
    }

    return 1; // all the numbers were found
}

This will run in O(n) for copying, O(36 log 36) for sorting, optionally O(n) for unique (where n is 6 * ST1) and O(n log n) for searching (where n can be less than 6 * ST1 if unique is employed). The whole algorithm therefore runs in linearithmic time. Note that this does not involve any dynamic memory allocation and as such is suitable even for GPU platforms (one would have to implement sorting and port std::unique() and std::lower_bound(), but all those are farily simple functions).

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