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How can I multiply and divide using only bit shifting and adding?

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11  
Like you would do it on paper in middle school, only using binary instead of decimal. –  Pascal Cuoq May 5 '10 at 19:36
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10 Answers

up vote 27 down vote accepted

To multiply in terms of adding and shifting you want to decompose one of the numbers by powers of two, like so:

21 * 5 = 10101_2 * 101_2             (Initial step)
       = 10101_2 * (1 * 2^2  +  0 * 2^1  +  1 * 2^0)
       = 10101_2 * 2^2 + 10101_2 * 2^0 
       = 10101_2 << 2 + 10101_2 << 0 (Decomposed)
       = 10101_2 * 4 + 10101_2 * 1
       = 10101_2 * 5
       = 21 * 5                      (Same as initial expression)

(_2 means base 2)

As you can see, multiplication can be decomposed into adding and shifting and back again. This is also why multiplication takes longer than bit shifts or adding - it's O(n^2) rather than O(n) in the number of bits. Real computer systems (as opposed to theoretical computer systems) have a finite number of bits, so multiplication takes a constant multiple of time compared to addition and shifting. If I recall correctly, modern processors, if pipelined properly, can do multiplication just about as fast as addition, by messing with the utilization of the ALUs (arithmetic units) in the processor.

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The answer by Andrew Toulouse can be extended to division.

The division by integer constants is considered in details in the book "Hacker's Delight" by Henry S. Warren (ISBN 9780201914658).

The first idea for implementing division is to write the inverse value of the denominator in base two.

E.g., 1/3 = (base-2) 0.0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 0101 .....

So, a/3 = (a >> 2) + (a >> 4) + (a >> 6) + ... + (a >> 30) for 32-bit arithmetics.

By combining the terms in an obvious manner we can reduce the number of operations:

b = (a >> 2) + (a >> 4)

b += (b >> 4)

b += (b >> 8)

b += (b >> 16)

There are more exciting ways to calculate division and remainders.

EDIT1:

If the OP means multiplication and division of arbitrary numbers, not the division by a constant number, then this thread might be of use: http://stackoverflow.com/a/12699549/1182653

EDIT2:

On of the fastest ways to divide by integer constants is to exploit the modular arithmetics and Montgomery reduction: What's the fastest way to divide an integer by 3?

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  1. A left shift by 1 position is analogous to multiplying by 2. A right shift is analogous to dividing by 2.
  2. You can add in a loop to multiply. By picking the loop variable and the addition variable correctly, you can bound performance. Once you've explored that, you should use Peasant Multiplication
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6  
+1: But the left shift isn't just analogous to multiplying by 2. It is multiplying by 2. At least until overflow... –  Don Roby May 5 '10 at 22:20
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X * 2 = 1 bit shift left
X / 2 = 1 bit shift right
X * 3 = shift left 1 bit and then add X

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3  
Do you mean add X for that last one? –  Mark Byers May 5 '10 at 19:39
    
Fixed typo. Thanks for the correction. –  Kelly S. French May 5 '10 at 20:05
1  
It's still wrong - last line should read: "X * 3 = shift left 1 bit and then add X" –  Paul R May 5 '10 at 21:02
    
"X / 2 = 1 bit shift right", not entirely, it rounds down to infinity, rather than up to 0 (for negative numbers), which is the usual implementation of division (at least as far as I've seen). –  Leif Andersen Aug 27 '11 at 18:26
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x << k == x multiplied by 2 to the power of k
x >> k == x divided by 2 to the power of k

You can use these shifts to do any multiplication operation. For example:

x * 14 == x * 16 - x * 2 == (x << 4) - (x << 1)
x * 12 == x * 8 + x * 4 == (x << 3) + (x << 2)

To divide a number by a non-power of two, I'm not aware of any easy way, unless you want to implement some low-level logic, use other binary operations and use some form of iteration.

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@IVlad: How would you combine the above operations to perform, say, divide by 3 ? –  Paul R May 5 '10 at 21:04
    
@Paul R - true, that's harder. I've clarified my answer. –  IVlad May 5 '10 at 21:30
    
division by a constant is not too hard (multiply by magic constant and then divide by power of 2), but division by a variable is a little trickier. –  Paul R May 6 '10 at 5:57
    
shouldn't x * 14 == x * 16 - x * 2 == (x << 4) - (x << 2) really end up being (x<<4) - (x<<1) since x<<1 is multiplying by x by 2? –  Alex Spencer Jan 13 at 20:04
    
@AlexSpencer - yes, you're correct. Thank you! –  IVlad Jan 13 at 22:21
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Take two numbers, lets say 9 and 10, write them as binary - 1001 and 1010.

Start with a result, R, of 0.

Take one of the numbers, 1010 in this case, we'll call it A, and shift it right by one bit, if you shift out a one, add the first number, we'll call it B, to R.

Now shift B left by one bit and repeat until all bits have been shifted out of A.

It's easier to see what's going on if you see it written out, this is the example:

      0
   0000      0
  10010      1
 000000      0
1001000      1
 ------
1011010
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This seems fastest, just requires a little extra coding to loop through the bits of the smallest number and compute the result. –  Hellonearthis Jan 15 '12 at 15:28
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Translated the pyth9on code to c. The example given had a minor flaw. If the dividend value that took up all the 32 bits the shift would fail. I just used 64 bit variables internally to work around the problem:

int No_divide(int nDivisor, int nDividend, int *nRemainder)
{
    int nQuotient = 0;
    int nPos = -1;
    unsigned long long ullDivisor = nDivisor;
    unsigned long long ullDividend = nDividend;

    while (ullDivisor <  ullDividend) 
    {
        ullDivisor <<= 1;
        nPos ++;
    }

    ullDivisor >>= 1;

    while (nPos > -1)
    {
        if (ullDividend >= ullDivisor)
        {
            nQuotient += (1 << nPos);                        
            ullDividend -= ullDivisor;  
        }

        ullDivisor >>= 1;
        nPos -= 1;
    }

    *nRemainder = (int) ullDividend;

    return nQuotient;
}
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This should work for multiplication:

.data

.text
.globl  main

main:

# $4 * $5 = $2

    addi $4, $0, 0x9
    addi $5, $0, 0x6

    add  $2, $0, $0 # initialize product to zero

Loop:   
    beq  $5, $0, Exit # if multiplier is 0,terminate loop
    andi $3, $5, 1 # mask out the 0th bit in multiplier
    beq  $3, $0, Shift # if the bit is 0, skip add
    addu $2, $2, $4 # add (shifted) multiplicand to product

Shift: 
    sll $4, $4, 1 # shift up the multiplicand 1 bit
    srl $5, $5, 1 # shift down the multiplier 1 bit
    j Loop # go for next  

Exit: #


EXIT: 
li $v0,10
syscall
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What flavor of assembly? –  Kazark Apr 1 '13 at 15:36
    
It is MIPS assembly, if this is what you are asking. I think I used MARS to write/run it. –  Melsi Apr 3 '13 at 9:34
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Try this. https://gist.github.com/swguru/5219592

import sys
# implement divide operation without using built-in divide operator
def divAndMod_slow(y,x, debug=0):
    r = 0
    while y >= x:
            r += 1
            y -= x
    return r,y 


# implement divide operation without using built-in divide operator
def divAndMod(y,x, debug=0):

    ## find the highest position of positive bit of the ratio
    pos = -1
    while y >= x:
            pos += 1
            x <<= 1
    x >>= 1
    if debug: print "y=%d, x=%d, pos=%d" % (y,x,pos)

    if pos == -1:
            return 0, y

    r = 0
    while pos >= 0:
            if y >= x:
                    r += (1 << pos)                        
                    y -= x                
            if debug: print "y=%d, x=%d, r=%d, pos=%d" % (y,x,r,pos)

            x >>= 1
            pos -= 1

    return r, y


if __name__ =="__main__":
    if len(sys.argv) == 3:
        y = int(sys.argv[1])
        x = int(sys.argv[2])
     else:
            y = 313271356
            x = 7

print "=== Slow Version ...."
res = divAndMod_slow( y, x)
print "%d = %d * %d + %d" % (y, x, res[0], res[1])

print "=== Fast Version ...."
res = divAndMod( y, x, debug=1)
print "%d = %d * %d + %d" % (y, x, res[0], res[1])
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This looks like python. The question was asked for assembly and/or C. –  NULL Apr 25 '13 at 12:24
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Below method is the implementation of binary divide considering both numbers are positive. If subtraction is a concern we can implement that as well using binary operators.

======

-(int)binaryDivide:(int)numerator with:(int)denominator
{

    if (numerator ==0 || denominator ==1) {
        return numerator;
    }

    if (denominator ==0) {

#ifdef DEBUG
        NSAssert(denominator==0, @"denominator should be greater then 0");
#endif
        return INFINITY;
    }


//    if (numerator <0) {
//        numerator = abs(numerator);
//    }




    int maxBitDenom = [self getMaxBit:denominator];
    int maxBitNumerator = [self getMaxBit:numerator];
    int msbNumber = [self getMSB:maxBitDenom ofNumber:numerator];

    int qoutient = 0;

    int subResult = 0;

    int remainingBits = maxBitNumerator-maxBitDenom;


    if(msbNumber>=denominator){
        qoutient |=1;
        subResult = msbNumber- denominator;
    }
    else{
        subResult = msbNumber;
    }


    while(remainingBits>0){
        int msbBit = (numerator & (1<<(remainingBits-1)))>0?1:0;
        subResult = (subResult <<1) |msbBit;
        if(subResult >= denominator){
            subResult = subResult-denominator;
            qoutient= (qoutient<<1)|1;
        }
        else{
            qoutient = qoutient<<1;
        }
        remainingBits--;

    }
    return qoutient;
}

-(int)getMaxBit:(int)inputNumber
{
    int maxBit =0;
    BOOL isMaxBitSet = NO;
    for(int i=0;i<sizeof(inputNumber)*8;i++){
        if( inputNumber & (1<<i) ){
            maxBit = i;
            isMaxBitSet=YES;
        }
    }
    if (isMaxBitSet) {
        maxBit+=1;
    }
    return maxBit;
}



-(int)getMSB:(int)bits ofNumber:(int)number
{
    int numbeMaxBit = [self getMaxBit:number];
    return number>>(numbeMaxBit -bits);
}

for multiplication ::

-(int)multiplyNumber:(int)num1 withNumber:(int)num2
{
    int mulResult =0;
    int ithBit;

    BOOL isNegativeSign = (num1<0 && num2>0) || (num1>0 && num2<0)   ;
    num1 = abs(num1);
    num2 = abs(num2);


    for(int i=0;i<sizeof(num2)*8;i++)
    {
        ithBit =  num2 & (1<<i);
        if(ithBit>0){
            mulResult +=(num1<<i);
        }

    }

    if (isNegativeSign) {
        mulResult =  ((~mulResult)+1 );
    }

    return mulResult;
}
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