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I apologize for such a question that likely has a trivial solution, but strangely, I could not find a concise API for this problem.

Essentially, I would like to truncate a string such that its length is not longer than a given value. I am writing to a database table and want to ensure that the values I write meet the constraint of the column's datatype.

For instance, it would be nice if I could write the following:

string NormalizeLength(string value, int maxLength)
{
    return value.Substring(0, maxLength);
}

Unfortunately, this raises an exception because maxLength generally exceeds the boundaries of the string value. Of course, I could write a function like the following, but I was hoping that something like this already exists.

string NormalizeLength(string value, int maxLength)
{
    return value.Length <= maxLength ? value : value.Substring(0, maxLength);
} 

Where is the elusive API that performs this task? Is there one?

share|improve this question
10  
For the record, strings are immutable you can't truncate them you can only return a truncated copy of them. Nitpicky, I know. –  John Weldon May 5 '10 at 20:55
2  
@John Weldon: That's probably why the member function doesn't exist -- it doesn't follow the semantics of the datatype. On a side note, StringBuilder lets you truncate by shorterning the length, but you still need to perform the length check to avoid widening the string. –  Steve Guidi May 5 '10 at 20:59
1  
Whichever solution you pick, be sure to add a check for a null string before calling Substring or accessing the Length property. –  Ray May 5 '10 at 20:59

19 Answers 19

up vote 175 down vote accepted

There isn't a Truncate() method on string, unfortunately. You have to write this kind of logic yourself. What you can do, however, is wrap this in an extension method so you don't have to duplicate it everywhere:

public static class StringExt
{
    public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) return value;
        return value.Length <= maxLength ? value : value.Substring(0, maxLength); 
    }
}

Now we can write:

var someString = "...";
someString = someString.Truncate(2);
share|improve this answer
3  
Great Solution, but remembered this only works in NET 3.5 and Up. Don't try it in NET2.0. –  Jedi Master Spooky May 5 '10 at 20:57
4  
As long as you're in VS 2008, and presumably VS 2010, you could still do this even if targeting .Net 2.0. danielmoth.com/Blog/… –  Mark May 5 '10 at 21:08
4  
This will fail when maxLength is a negative value. –  Bernard Jun 27 '13 at 18:57
6  
@Bernard, this is supposed to fail if maxLength is negative. Any other behavior would be unexpected. –  bojingo Feb 14 '14 at 20:09

Or instead of the ternary operator, you could use Math.min

public static class StringExt
{
    public static string Truncate( this string value, int maxLength )
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) { return value; }

        return value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Clever! And the following expression is optimized to return a reference to the original string: value.Substring(0, value.Length). –  Steve Guidi May 5 '10 at 21:01
2  
Unfortunately it's not optimized for cases where value.Length is less than MaxLength which may be a common case in some data. Also the Length property on string should be capitalized. –  jpierson Dec 19 '12 at 20:34
    
This will fail when maxLength is a negative value. –  Bernard Jun 27 '13 at 18:55

I figured I would throw in my implementation since I believe it covers all of the cases that have been touched on by the others and does so in a concise way that is still readable.

public string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) && value.Length > maxLength)
    {
        return value.Substring(0, maxLength);
    }

    return value;
}

This solution mainly builds upon the Ray's solution and opens up the method for use as an extension method by using the this keyword just as LBushkin does in his solution.

share|improve this answer
    
This will fail when maxLength is a negative value. –  Bernard Jun 27 '13 at 18:54
4  
@Bernard - I would recommend not passing a negative value for the maxLength argument as it is an unexpected value. The Substring method takes the same approach so there is no reason to improve on the exception it throws. –  jpierson Jun 28 '13 at 15:32

You could use LINQ... it eliminates the need to check string length. Admittedly maybe not the most efficient, but it's fun.

string result = string.Join("", value.Take(maxLength)); // .NET 4 Join

or

string result = new string(value.Take(maxLength).ToArray());
share|improve this answer

The .NET Framework has an API to truncate a string like this:

Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.Left(string, int);

But in a C# app you'll probably prefer to roll your own than taking a dependency on Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll, whose main raison d'etre is backwards compatibility.

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In .NET 4.0 you can do

string.Concat(myString.Take(maxLength))

Not tested for efficiency!

share|improve this answer
    
There have been several answers that use the Take extension method, and contain more detail than this. One is almost 4 years old. This answer is redundant. Don't get me wrong, I like this solution. I just don't see a point in performing Question Necromancy to give an answer that's already been given 4 years ago. –  Daniel Mann Dec 6 '13 at 4:25
6  
Pretty sure nobody else had suggested using string.Concat. –  Dylan Nicholson Dec 6 '13 at 4:37

Taking @CaffGeek and simplifying it:

public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? value : value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength));
    }
share|improve this answer

I prefer jpierson's answer, but none of the examples here that I can see are handling an invalid maxLength parameter, such as when maxLength < 0.

Choices would be either handle the error in a try/catch, clamp the maxLength parameter min to 0, or if maxLength is less than 0 return an empty string.

Not optimized code:

public string Truncate(this string value, int maximumLength)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) == true) { return value; }
    if (maximumLen < 0) { return String.Empty; }
    if (value.Length > maximumLength) { return value.Substring(0, maximumLength); }
    return value;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note, that in my implementation I chose not to handle the case where maximumLength is less than 0 because I figured the only thing I would do is throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeExcpetion which essentially what string.Substring() does for me. –  jpierson Jun 26 '13 at 3:22

Kndly note that truncating a string not merely means justing cutting a string at a specified length alone but have to take care not to split the word.

eg string : this is a test string.

I want to cut it at 11 . If we use any of the method given above the result will be

this is a te

This is not the thing we want

The method i am using may also not so perfect but it can handle most of the situation

public string CutString(string source, int length)
{
        if (source== null || source.Length < length)
        {
            return source;
        }
        int nextSpace = source.LastIndexOf(" ", length);
        return string.Format("{0}...", input.Substring(0, (nextSpace > 0) ? nextSpace : length).Trim());
} 
share|improve this answer

Why not

string NormalizeLength(string value, int maxLength)
{
    //check String.IsNullOrEmpty(value) and act on it. 
    return value.PadRight(maxLength).Substring(0, maxLength);
}

i.e. in the event value.Length < maxLength pad spaces to the end or truncate the excess.

share|improve this answer

I know this is an old question, but here is a nice solution:

public static string Truncate(this string text, int maxLength, string suffix = "...")
{
    string str = text;
    if (maxLength > 0)
    {
        int length = maxLength - suffix.Length;
        if (length <= 0)
        {
            return str;
        }
        if ((text != null) && (text.Length > maxLength))
        {
            return (text.Substring(0, length).TrimEnd(new char[0]) + suffix);
        }
    }
    return str;
}

var myString = "hello world"
var myTruncatedString = myString.Truncate(4);

Returns: hello...

share|improve this answer
    
Use this special character en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellipsis –  SarjanWebDev Oct 21 '14 at 5:29

Seems no one has posted this yet:

public static class StringExt
{
    public static string Truncate(this string s, int maxLength)
    {
        return s != null && s.Length > maxLength ? s.Substring(0, maxLength) : s;
    }
}

Using the && operator makes it marginally better than the accepted answer.

share|improve this answer

There is nothing in .net for this that I am aware of - here is my version which adds "...":

public static string truncateString(string originalString, int length) {
  if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(originalString)) {
   return originalString;
  }
  if (originalString.Length > length) {
   return originalString.Substring(0, length) + "...";
  }
  else {
   return originalString;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Your version will give strings that are 3 characters longer than the requested length, in case they are truncated. Besides, the triple dots are really just meaningful in representation, I would not store it in a database like that which is the use case that the OP gave. –  MDeSchaepmeester Jun 30 '14 at 14:27

What about simply doing

myString.Remove(indexToStartTruncating);

This is essentially the same as the truncate method in the accepted answer.

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2  
This throws an exception if the index is beyond the end of the string. –  juharr Nov 8 '12 at 16:14
    
In case it's not clear, this does not modify myString in-place; it returns a value that contains the truncated string. –  wardies Jun 11 '13 at 16:22
public static string Truncate( this string value, int maxLength )
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) { return value; }

        return new string(value.Take(maxLength).ToArray());// use LINQ and be happy
    }
share|improve this answer

For the sake of (over)complexity I'll add my overloaded version which replaces the last 3 characters with an ellipsis in respect with the maxLength parameter.

public static string Truncate1(this string value, int maxLength, bool replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis = false)
{
    if (replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis &&
        maxLength <= 3)
    { 
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("maxLength",
            "maxLength greater than three when replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis is true");
    }
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) { return value; }

    if (replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis &&
        value.Length > maxLength)
    {
        return value.Substring(0, maxLength - 3) + "...";
    }

    return value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength)); 
}
share|improve this answer

This is the code I usually use:

string getSubString(string value, int index, int length)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) || value.Length <= length)
            {
                return value;
            }
            string temp = "";
            for (int i = index; i < length; i++)
            {
                temp += value[i].ToString();
            }
            return temp;
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
Please note that concatenating strings with += is an expensive operation, especially when rebuilding character by character. .NET strings are immutable, which means in this case, a new string is created each time in your loop. –  Steve Guidi Sep 21 '14 at 16:11
    
@SteveGuidi strings are not immutable, they just masquerade as immutable. I wish strings were true immutable primitives so I could have string and string?, but alas they are not primitives. –  Chris Marisic Jan 1 at 0:29

Just in case there's not enough answers here, here's mine :)

public static string Truncate(this string str, 
                              int totalLength, 
                              string truncationIndicator = "")
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) || str.Length < totalLength) 
        return str;

    return str.Substring(0, totalLength - truncationIndicator.Length) 
           + truncationIndicator;
}

to use:

"I use it like this".Truncate(5,"~")
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Here is a vb.net solution, mark that the if (although ugly) statement improves performance because we do not need the substring statement when string is already smaller than maxlength... By making it an extention to string it is easy to use...

 <System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension()> _
    Public Function Truncate(String__1 As String, maxlength As Integer) As String
        If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(String__1) AndAlso String__1.Length > maxlength Then
            Return String__1.Substring(0, maxlength)
        Else
            Return String__1
        End If
    End Function
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