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I'm passing function GetCurrentDate() the pointer to a tm struct. Within that function I printf the uninitialized data, then the initialized. Expected results.

However when I return the tm struct appears uninitialized. See console output below. What am I doing wrong?

uninitialized date:??? ???-1073908332 01:9448278:-1073908376 -1217355836

initialized date:Wed May 5 23:08:40 2010

Caller date:??? ???-1073908332 01:9448278:-1073908376 -121735583

int main()
{
    test(); 
}

int test()
{
    struct tm* CurrentDate;
    GetCurrentDate(CurrentDate);
    printf("Caller date:%s\n",asctime (CurrentDate));
    return 1;
}

int GetCurrentDate(struct tm* p_ReturnDate)
{ 
    printf("uninitialized date:%s\n",asctime (p_ReturnDate));
    time_t m_TimeEntity;
    m_TimeEntity = time(NULL); //setting current time into a time_t struct

    p_ReturnDate = localtime(&m_TimeEntity); //converting time_t to tm struct
    printf("initialized date:%s\n",asctime (p_ReturnDate));
    return 1;
}  
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I'm quite surprised the program didn't crash outright when you used the uninitialized pointer. –  Mark Ransom May 6 '10 at 14:40
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are updating the pointer p_ReturnDate in the function, not updating the structure that p_ReturnDate points to. Because the pointer is passed by value, the update doesn't affect the caller.

Also as pointed out by Joseph Quinsey you need to provide a place to put the result. You're only allocating a pointer in the caller, not the whole structure.

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In test(), you need to actually specify memory to store the data. For example;

struct tm CurrentDate;
GetCurrentDate(&CurrentDate);
printf("Caller date:%s\n",asctime(&CurrentDate));
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this does not work –  Luke Mcneice May 5 '10 at 22:39
2  
Yes, the dreaded two-bug design pattern, as Mark Ranson points out. –  Joseph Quinsey May 5 '10 at 23:21
1  
"The dreaded two-bug design pattern" - that's great, I'll have to remember that one! I'm surprised the GOF didn't cover it in their book, it's popular enough. –  Mark Ransom May 6 '10 at 14:36
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int
main()
{
    test(); 
}

void
test()
{
    struct tm CurrentDate;

    GetCurrentDate(&CurrentDate);
    printf("Caller date:%s\n", asctime(&CurrentDate));
}

void
GetCurrentDate(struct tm* p_ReturnDate)
{ 
    time_t m_TimeEntity;

    printf("uninitialized date:%s\n", asctime(p_ReturnDate));    
    m_TimeEntity = time(NULL); //setting current time into a time_t struct
    *p_ReturnDate = *localtime(&m_TimeEntity); //converting time_t to tm struct    
    printf("initialized date:%s\n", asctime (p_ReturnDate));
}  
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Sometimes it's best to let someone figure things out on their own. Sometimes they need to see the answer before they can understand. It's a fine line. –  Mark Ransom May 6 '10 at 14:39
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