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I keep stumbling on the format specifiers for the printf() family of functions. What I want is to be able to print a double (or float) with a maximum given number of digits after the decimal point. If I use:

printf("%1.3f", 359.01335);
printf("%1.3f", 359.00999);

I get

359.013
359.010

Instead of the desired

359.013
359.01

Can anybody help me?

share|improve this question
    
Floating point inexactness really means you should do the rounding yourself. Take a variant of R and Juha's answer (which don't quite handle the trailing zeroes), and fix it up. –  wnoise Feb 9 '11 at 0:56

10 Answers 10

up vote 36 down vote accepted

This can't be done with the normal printf format specifiers. The closest you could get would be:

printf("%.6g", 359.013); // 359.013
printf("%.6g", 359.01);  // 359.01

but the ".6" is the total numeric width so

printf("%.6g", 3.01357); // 3.01357

breaks it.

What you probably need to do is to sprintf("%.20g") the number to a string buffer then manipulate the string to only have N characters past the decimal point.

Assuming your number is in the variable num, the following function will remove all but the first N decimals, then strip off the trailing zeros (and decimal point if they were all zeros).

char str[50];
sprintf (str,"%.20g",num);  // Make the number.
morphNumericString (str, 3);
:    :
void morphNumericString (char *s, int n) {
    char *p;
    int count;

    p = strchr (s,'.');         // Find decimal point, if any.
    if (p != NULL) {
        count = n;              // Adjust for more or less decimals.
        while (count >= 0) {    // Maximum decimals allowed.
             count--;
             if (*p != '\0')    // If there's less than desired.
                 break;
             p++;               // Next character.
        }

        *p-- = '\0';            // Truncate string.
        while (*p == '0')       // Remove trailing zeros.
            *p-- = '\0';

        if (*p == '.') {        // If all decimals were zeros, remove ".".
            *p = '\0';
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I feared so. Thanks. –  Gorpik Nov 10 '08 at 13:34
4  
Note, this answer assumes that the decimal place is . In some locales, the decimal place is actually a , comma. –  user609020 Feb 9 '11 at 0:32
1  
There is actually a minor typo here - p = strchr (str,'.'); should actually be p = strchr (s,'.'); To use the function param rather than the global var. –  n3wtz May 2 '11 at 14:15

To get rid of the trailing zeros, you should use the "%g" format:

float num = 1.33;
printf("%g", num); //output: 1.33

After the question was clarified a bit, that suppressing zeros is not the only thing that was asked, but limiting the output to three decimal places was required as well. I think that can't be done with sprintf format strings alone. As Pax Diablo pointed out, string manipulation would be required.

share|improve this answer
    
See the MSDN help page: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0ecbz014(VS.80).aspx –  xtofl Nov 10 '08 at 12:49
    
@Tomalak: This does not do what I want. I want to be able to specify a maximum number of digits after the decimal point. This is: I want 1.3347 to be printed "1.335" and 1.3397 to be printed "1.34" @xtofl: I had already checked that, but I still can't see the answer to my problem –  Gorpik Nov 10 '08 at 12:55
    
I have edited my question in order to improve the example, so what I need is clearer. –  Gorpik Nov 10 '08 at 12:58
    
Author want style 'f' not style 'e'. 'g' can use style 'e' : From documentation : Style e is used if the exponent from its conversion is less than -4 or greater than or equal to the precision. –  Julien Palard Jun 4 '13 at 14:58
    
i think this should be the answer. –  rbhawsar Jun 11 '13 at 14:48

I like the answer of R. slightly tweaked:

float f = 1234.56789;
printf("%d.%.0f", f, 1000*(f-(int)f));

'1000' determines the precision.

Power to the 0.5 rounding.

EDIT

Ok, this answer was edited a few times and I lost track what I was thinking a few years back (and originally it did not fill all the criteria). So here is a new version (that fills all criteria and handles negative numbers correctly):

double f = 1234.05678900;
char s[100]; 
int decimals = 10;

sprintf(s,"%.*g", decimals, ((int)(pow(10, decimals)*(fabs(f) - abs((int)f)) +0.5))/pow(10,decimals));
printf("10 descimals: %d%s\n", (int)f, s+1);

And the test cases:

#import <stdio.h>
#import <stdlib.h>
#import <math.h>

int main(void){

    double f = 1234.05678900;
    char s[100];
    int decimals;

    decimals = 10;
    sprintf(s,"%.*g", decimals, ((int)(pow(10, decimals)*(fabs(f) - abs((int)f)) +0.5))/pow(10,decimals));
    printf("10 descimals: %d%s\n", (int)f, s+1);

    decimals = 3;
    sprintf(s,"%.*g", decimals, ((int)(pow(10, decimals)*(fabs(f) - abs((int)f)) +0.5))/pow(10,decimals));
    printf(" 3 descimals: %d%s\n", (int)f, s+1);

    f = -f;
    decimals = 10;
    sprintf(s,"%.*g", decimals, ((int)(pow(10, decimals)*(fabs(f) - abs((int)f)) +0.5))/pow(10,decimals));
    printf(" negative 10: %d%s\n", (int)f, s+1);

    decimals = 3;
    sprintf(s,"%.*g", decimals, ((int)(pow(10, decimals)*(fabs(f) - abs((int)f)) +0.5))/pow(10,decimals));
    printf(" negative  3: %d%s\n", (int)f, s+1);

    decimals = 2;
    f = 1.012;
    sprintf(s,"%.*g", decimals, ((int)(pow(10, decimals)*(fabs(f) - abs((int)f)) +0.5))/pow(10,decimals));
    printf(" additional : %d%s\n", (int)f, s+1);

    return 0;
}

And the output of the tests:

10 descimals: 1234.056789
 3 descimals: 1234.057
 negative 10: -1234.056789
 negative  3: -1234.057
 additional : 1.01

Now, all criteria are met:

  • maximum number of desimals behind the zero is fixed
  • trailing zeros are removed
  • it does it mathematically right (right?)
  • works (now) also when first decimal is zero

Unfortunately this answer is a twoliner as sprintf does not return the string.

Holy, thread resurrection batman!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For making this a one-liner. –  flu Sep 6 '12 at 10:29
    
This doesn't actually seem to trim trailing zeroes, though? It can gladly spit out something like 1.1000. –  Dean J Sep 4 '13 at 2:24
    
The question and my answer are not the originals anymore... I will check later. –  Juha Sep 9 '13 at 7:11
    
The question is exactly the same as it was when you answered, save for a tag change. Now, somebody decided to play around with your answer, I don't know why. –  Gorpik Sep 25 '13 at 6:59
    
Ok, I didn't look that carefully what was edited and what was not. Anyway, I added a new twoliner (actually threeliner) that should do the trick. –  Juha Sep 27 '13 at 8:39

What about something like this (might have rounding errors and negative-value issues that need debugging, left as an exercise for the reader):

printf("%.0d%.4g\n", (int)f/10, f-((int)f-(int)f%10));

It's slightly programmatic but at least it doesn't make you do any string manipulation.

share|improve this answer

I search the string (starting rightmost) for the first character in the range 1 to 9 (ASCII value 49-57) then null (set to 0) each char right of it - see below:

void stripTrailingZeros(void) { 
    //This finds the index of the rightmost ASCII char[1-9] in array
    //All elements to the left of this are nulled (=0)
    int i = 20;
    unsigned char char1 = 0; //initialised to ensure entry to condition below

    while ((char1 > 57) || (char1 < 49)) {
        i--;
        char1 = sprintfBuffer[i];
    }

    //null chars left of i
    for (int j = i; j < 20; j++) {
        sprintfBuffer[i] = 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

A simple solution but it gets the job done, assigns a known length and precision and avoids the chance of going exponential format (which is a risk when you use %g):

// Since we are only interested in 3 decimal places, this function
// can avoid any potential miniscule floating point differences
// which can return false when using "=="
int DoubleEquals(double i, double j)
{
    return (fabs(i - j) < 0.000001);
}

void PrintMaxThreeDecimal(double d)
{
    if (DoubleEquals(d, floor(d)))
        printf("%.0f", d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 10, floor(d * 10)))
        printf("%.1f", d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 100, floor(d* 100)))
        printf("%.2f", d);
    else
        printf("%.3f", d);
}

Add or remove "elses" if you want a max of 2 decimals; 4 decimals; etc.

For example if you wanted 2 decimals:

void PrintMaxTwoDecimal(double d)
{
    if (DoubleEquals(d, floor(d)))
        printf("%.0f", d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 10, floor(d * 10)))
        printf("%.1f", d);
    else
        printf("%.2f", d);
}

If you want to specify the minimum width to keep fields aligned, increment as necessary, for example:

void PrintAlignedMaxThreeDecimal(double d)
{
    if (DoubleEquals(d, floor(d)))
        printf("%7.0f", d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 10, floor(d * 10)))
        printf("%9.1f", d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 100, floor(d* 100)))
        printf("%10.2f", d);
    else
        printf("%11.3f", d);
}

You could also convert that to a function where you pass the desired width of the field:

void PrintAlignedWidthMaxThreeDecimal(int w, double d)
{
    if (DoubleEquals(d, floor(d)))
        printf("%*.0f", w-4, d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 10, floor(d * 10)))
        printf("%*.1f", w-2, d);
    else if (DoubleEquals(d * 100, floor(d* 100)))
        printf("%*.2f", w-1, d);
    else
        printf("%*.3f", w, d);
}
share|improve this answer

Here is my first try at an answer:

void
xprintfloat(char *format, float f)
{
  char s[50];
  char *p;

  sprintf(s, format, f);
  for(p=s; *p; ++p)
    if('.' == *p) {
      while(*++p);
      while('0'==*--p) *p = '\0';
    }
  printf("%s", s);
}

Known bugs: Possible buffer overflow depending on format. If "." is present for other reason than %f wrong result might happen.

share|improve this answer
    
Your known bugs are the same that printf() itself has, so no problems there. But I was looking for a format string that allowed me doing what I wanted, not a programmatic solution, which is what I already have. –  Gorpik Nov 11 '08 at 8:43

Slight variation on above: -

  1. Eliminates period for case (10000.0).
  2. Breaks after first period is processed.

Code here: -

void EliminateTrailingFloatZeros(char *iValue)
{
  char *p = 0;
  for(p=iValue; *p; ++p) {
    if('.' == *p) {
      while(*++p);
      while('0'==*--p) *p = '\0';
      if(*p == '.') *p = '\0';
      break;
    }
  }
}

It still has potential for overflow, so be careful ;P

share|improve this answer

Your code rounds to three decimal places due to the ".3" before the f

printf("%1.3f", 359.01335);
printf("%1.3f", 359.00999);

Thus if you the second line rounded to two decimal places, you should change it to this:

printf("%1.3f", 359.01335);
printf("%1.2f", 359.00999);

That code will output your desired results:

359.013
359.01

*Note this is assuming you already have it printing on separate lines, if not then the following will prevent it from printing on the same line:

printf("%1.3f\n", 359.01335);
printf("%1.2f\n", 359.00999);

The Following program source code was my test for this answer

#include <cstdio>

int main()
{

    printf("%1.3f\n", 359.01335);
    printf("%1.2f\n", 359.00999);

    while (true){}

    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer
2  
The question was about creating one format string that omits trailing zeros, not to have different format strings for each case. –  Christoph Walesch Sep 24 '13 at 22:48
    
+1 to compensate the -1 xD –  user2332868 Jun 13 at 19:35

Why not just do this?

double f = 359.01335;
printf("%g", round(f * 1000.0) / 1000.0);
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