Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The 'K&R', 'Red Book', 'Camel' of JavaScript and CSS? When you see a site like www.cmegroup.com or www.gs.com, what reading material do the developers likely have on their shelves?

share|improve this question
7  
You should accept answers to your questions. –  SLaks May 6 '10 at 1:11
1  
Give a look to this list of JavaScript resources I've posted some days ago. –  CMS May 6 '10 at 1:14
2  
    
SLaks, then I'd be playing favorites. I don't want to do that. I just want to thank each and every one of you who respond. –  user225626 May 6 '10 at 1:50
1  
@user225626: accepting an answer is expected, and is how SO works. It shows that the question has a definitive answer and doesn't need more, which helps people looking for unanswered questions. It also rewards the answerer with reputation. If you want to thank others, upvote their answers, though you should only upvote answers that actually help. If a question can't have a definitive answer, make it community wiki (meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/11740/…). –  outis May 6 '10 at 21:55
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

For JavaScript it's probably JavaScript: The Good Parts and/or JavaScript: The Definitive Guide.

JavaScript vs. Just the good parts

I don't know if there's an equivalent book for CSS yet.

share|improve this answer
2  
O'reilly boy! ;)! –  msemelman May 6 '10 at 1:24
    
@noinflection: My knee-jerk reaction was to deny it, but then I took a look around here and realized that I have an awful lot of books with animals on the covers. :) –  Bill the Lizard May 6 '10 at 1:30
1  
They are really good books! –  msemelman May 6 '10 at 3:00
add comment

To learn basic important things (which are not highlighted by every author) are taught by Mr. Crockford http://yuiblog.com/crockford/ in this video. and his website http://www.crockford.com/

share|improve this answer
add comment

It may be a little dated now. I learned the most from Bullet proof CSS.

http://simplebits.com/publications/bulletproof/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks [have to infill chars for this to add]. –  user225626 May 6 '10 at 3:12
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.