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Update - Many people are insisting I need to declare an iVar for the property. Some are saying not so, as I am using Modern Runtime (64 bit). I can confirm that I have been successfully using @property without iVars for months now. Therefore, I think the 'correct' answer is an explanation as to why on 64bit I suddenly have to explicitly declare the iVar when (and only when) i'm going to access it from a child class. The only one I've seen so far is a possible GCC bug (thanks Yuji). Not so simple after all... To clarify the possible bug is this: When inheriting from a base class, a child can not access the parent's iVar IF that child also happens to implement an UNRELATED accessor using @synthesize BEFORE the iVar is accessed.

I've been scratching my head with this for a couple of hours - I haven't used inheritance much.

Here I have set up a simple Test B class that inherits from Test A, where an ivar is declared. But I get the compilation error that the variable is undeclared. This only happens when I add the property and synthesize declarations - works fine without them.

TestA Header:

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>
@interface TestA : NSObject {
    NSString *testString;
}
@end

TestA Implementation is empty:

#import "TestA.h"
@implementation TestA  
@end

TestB Header:

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>
#import "TestA.h"
@interface TestB : TestA {
}
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSString *testProp;
@end

TestB Implementation (Error - 'testString' is undeclared)

#import "TestB.h"
@implementation TestB
@synthesize testProp;
- (void)testing{
    NSLog(@"test ivar is %@", testString);
}
@end
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If it "only happens when [you] add the property and synthesize declarations", they're not a red herring. As I've mentioned, they're actually causing the problem because there is no testProp string instance variable. I declared one and the problem went away. –  Quinn Taylor May 6 '10 at 6:15
    
I've just checked to make sure I wasn't going mental, and I use @property without an ivar all the time without any issues. I agree that declaring an ivar 'fixes' it, but doesn't really explain why it only fails to compile when I use inheritance. Just to re-iterate, I'm not declaring ivars for about 50 properties just within the same project, in many different classes, all without issue. –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:22
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think this is the bug of GCC 4.2.1. I made the file foo.m with the content

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
@interface TestA : NSObject {
    NSString *testString;
}
@end

@implementation TestA  
@end

@interface TestB : TestA {
}
@property (retain) NSString *testProp;
@end

@implementation TestB
@synthesize testProp;
- (void)testing{
NSLog(@"test ivar is %@", testString);
}
@end

Note that it's OK in the 64 bit mode to omit the instance variable. My GCC 4.2.1 on OS X 10.6.3 gave me an error:

$ gcc -arch x86_64 -c foo.m
aho.m: In function ‘-[TestB testing]’:
aho.m:19: error: ‘testString’ undeclared (first use in this function)
aho.m:19: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
aho.m:19: error: for each function it appears in.)

This compiled without problem by changing

NSLog(@"test ivar is %@", testString);

to

NSLog(@"test ivar is %@", self->testString);

Clang compiled it without any problem.

( In the 32 bit mode, I got

$ gcc -arch i386 -c foo.m
aho.m:17: error: synthesized property ‘testProp’ must either be named 
the same as a compatible ivar or must explicitly name an ivar
aho.m: In function ‘-[TestB testing]’:
aho.m:19: error: ‘testString’ undeclared (first use in this function)
aho.m:19: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
aho.m:19: error: for each function it appears in.)

which is a perfectly expected behavior, as Manjunath wrote.)

However I think it's generally a rather bad idea to access an instance variable of the superclass: when you implement the methods the superclass, you cannot assume anything about the instance variable because it might be tweaked in a worst manner possible by the subclass. You at least need to write down what kind of operation on the instance variable is permitted or not... Remember you might need to maintain your code for years! I would prefer keeping programming contracts between various parts of the code at the level of methods and properties.

Finally you should change

@property NSString *testProp;

to

@property (copy) NSString *testProp;

or at least to

@property (retain) NSString *testProp;

if you're not using GC on OS X. Otherwise EXP_BAD_ACCESS will await you!

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The first part is wrong; but for the second part: unless you /need/ it to support threaded access, (whatever, nonatomic) is also suggested. –  Grant Paul May 6 '10 at 5:12
1  
Naaaah! Did you both really compile the file? I combined everything in a .m file and gcc gave the error. I edit the post above to include the file I used. –  Yuji May 6 '10 at 5:49
    
Manjunath - I am already importing the base class?! See code above. –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:10
    
@Ben Packard. Ya I have edited my answer. Just check it out. –  Manjunath May 6 '10 at 6:13
    
Yuji thanks for compiling this - surprised it could be a GCC error of all things! As for your point about accessing an ivar - the ivar in the actual project is an array. Say for example I have a super class Vehicle, that has an iVar array currentPassengers. Doesn't it make sense that all passenger carrying vehicles inherit this array? As well as inheriting methods like addPassenger and removePassenger, which could also be declared in the base class? Or how would you do it? –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:44
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I think you just have a typo - it should be "testString" not "test"

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Thanks - have updated. Wasn't the problem unfortunately, but did help me narrow it down. –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 4:23
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I'm seeing error: 'testString' undeclared (first use in this function) when the @synthesize is just before the testing method. The error disappears if I move the @synthesize below the method implementation. This might be because the TestB class doesn't have a testProp string instance variable to use with the declared property. (In the Legacy (32-bit) runtime, you must declare instance variables to use for properties — in Modern runtime (64-bit Mac, iPhone) they can be inferred, so declaring them is optional.) Is it possible that you meant to name the property testString instead?


EDIT: In GCC 4.2, it works if you change TestB.h to the following:

#import "TestA.h"

@interface TestB : TestA {
    NSString *testProp; // <-- Adding this fixes the errors
}
@property NSString *testProp;

@end

However, using the Clang-LLVM compiler, the code works unmodified. Perhaps this is a bug to file.

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Yes that was a copy and paste mistake, corrected. But i've been using properties for 6 months without declaring ivars?!? eg. @property (nonatomic, retain) –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:05
    
Or does the retain do that? Either way, doesn't resolve it unfortunately. –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:07
    
You don't have to declare instance variables for the properties if you're using modern runtime. Modern runtime includes iPhone OS and 64 bit on OS X. –  Yuji May 6 '10 at 6:10
1  
Exactly - I'm saying that for 6 months I've been declaring string properties for example (with nonatomic, retain) without having to declare an ivar in the curly braces. –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:14
1  
Yep that's my original problem - why do I need the iVar only when inheriting. –  Ben Packard May 6 '10 at 6:32
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I just ran into that same problem but the sources were complex enough that I didn't quite understand what made iVar from the parent inaccessible when I used GCC. I only knew for sure that a few months ago and before changes in my code it worked and also that it is working with clang which I've been using for a while. Suddenly I had to build with GCC and it wouldn't anymore.

At least this article gave me a bypass (declare the iVars). I am surprised that the latest version of XCode does not include a fixed compiler

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