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If I have the enum:

public enum VehicleType
{
    Car = 0,
    Boat = 1,
    Bike = 2,
    Spaceship = 3
}

and I then do:

int X = 10;
VehicleType vt = (VehicleType)2;
X = X + vt;
Console.WriteLine("I travel in a " + vt + " with " + X + " people.");

What should the output be in C#?

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1  
Debug.Print "I travel in a " + vt + " with " + X + " people."; OMG! Why can't you people hire a car? –  Amsakanna May 6 '10 at 8:03
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

An enum's base type is int by default. It can also be a byte, sbyte, short, ushort, uint, long, or ulong if explicitly specified.

X = X + vt will error because it needs to be an explicit cast.

If it were X += (int)vt; it would be:

"I travel in a Bike with 12 people."

because when using Console.WriteLine all variables' ToString() methods are called so the string representation of the Enum is given (enum is 2, that equates to Bike, so Bike is returned).

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My enums are evaluating to strings where it would suit. ie. I travel in a Bike with 12 people. –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 8:11
    
@Neale: the answer is incorrect. If someone is going to answer a question like this they should run the code through a compiler if they are not sure. –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 8:45
    
Have run the code - your code will not compile. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:48
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sbbt4032%28VS.80%29.aspx - C# forces explicit enum casting. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:56
    
You are correct that the X = X + vt will not compile because it requires an explicit cast, but you are incorrect in saying that enum casts to an int by default because enums will cast to string when concatenated to a string. –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 9:25
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In X = X + vt; vt will be casted to int. In "I travel in a " + vt + " with " + X + " people." vt will be replaced to vt.ToString(), which will print the name of the enum.

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[In X = X + vt; vt will be casted to int] - no it won't. There is no implicit casting method on Enums and they are sealed by the compiler so one cannot be implemented. An explicit cast is needed: X = X + (int)vt; –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:45
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sbbt4032%28VS.80%29.aspx - C# forces explicit enum casting. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:56
    
@Neale: When I try something similar in a c# compiler I am getting what this answer says so I think it is correct. Have you tried this in a compiler? –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 8:56
    
Try compiling the exact code you have in your question - the X = X + vt; line will not compile. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:58
    
If X = X + vt doesn't compile then how could vt be represented as an integer as per the other answers? –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 9:06
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They are represented as integers. I wish they could be represented as objects!

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@Neale: the answer is incorrect. If someone is going to answer a question like this they should run the code through a compiler if they are not sure. –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 8:47
    
This is not incorrect - it is a true statement following by a valid opinion. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:49
    
They are not represented as integers when they concatenated to strings, so the answer is incorrect. –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 9:23
    
I see your point, this looks more to be a misunderstanding of your question. An enum will never cast itself to anything other than its integral type. However, calling ToString() will return the string value. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 9:28
    
upvoted to compensate downvote of correct answer –  Oliver May 6 '10 at 9:49
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As the others already mentioned you just get an integer.

That's because the base-type of an enum is an integer, but this can be changed to any other value type by e.g. public enum VehicleType : ushort.

To get some better handling with these names the Enum class has some handy functions (like GetName(), IsDefined() or Parse()).

Just to answer the question So how can you say that the enum is being represented as an int in what you have just stated? from the comments: Take a look at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sbbt4032.aspx (especially take a decent look into the last example using Flags).

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@Neale: the answer is incorrect. If someone is going to answer a question like this they should run the code through a compiler if they are not sure. –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 8:48
    
There's nothing incorrect in this answer. –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 8:49
    
@Craig: which of the code in my answer is incorrect? –  Oliver May 6 '10 at 8:56
    
Then why are there 6 votes for the selected answer and no votes for any others? –  CJ7 May 6 '10 at 8:58
    
That doesn't make the other answers incorrect. In fact the selected answer is the only one that is wrong (in part)! –  David Neale May 6 '10 at 9:00
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