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The problem, is that I have a content div which stretches its container height-wise (container and content div have auto height).

I want the background container, which is a sibling div of the content div to stretch to fill the container. The background container contains divs to break the background into chunks.

The background and container divs have 100% width, the content container doesn't.

HTML:

<div id="container">  
    <div id="content">  
        Some long content here ..  
    </div>  
     <div id="backgroundContainer">  
         <div id="someDivToShowABackground"/>  
         <div id="someDivToShowAnotherBackground"/>  
    </div>  
</div>

CSS:

#container {
    height:auto;
    width:100%;
}

#content {
    height: auto;
    width:500px;
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
}

#backgroundContainer {
    height:100%;??? I want this to be the same height as container, but 100% makes it the height of the viewport.
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you found a solution for this problem? I'm kinda stuck in the same problem. –  Andrew G.H. Mar 18 '12 at 21:05
    
When you set a percentage width it is a percentage of the parent element, not the whole screen. The only exception to this is the <html> element at the very top. –  starbeamrainbowlabs Jul 29 '12 at 8:46

8 Answers 8

There are a number of solutions for this problem, including OneTrueLayout Technique, Faux Columns Technique, CSS Tabular Display Technique and there is also a Layering Technique.

A solution for equally height-ed columns is the CSS Tabular Display Technique that means to use the display:table feature. It works for Firefox 2+, Safari 3+, Opera 9+ and IE8.

The code for the CSS Tabular Display:

The HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="rowWraper" class="row">
            <div id="col1" class="col">
                Column 1<br />Lorem ipsum<br />ipsum lorem
            </div>
            <div id="col2" class="col">
                Column 2<br />Eco cologna duo est!
            </div>
            <div id="col3" class="col">
                Column 3
            </div>
        </div>
</div>

The CSS

<style>
#container{
    display:table;  
    background-color:#CCC;
    margin:0 auto;
}

.row{
    display:table-row;
}

.col{
    display: table-cell;
}

#col1{
    background-color:#0CC;
    width:200px;
}

#col2{
    background-color:#9F9;
    width:300px;
}

#col3{
    background-color:#699;
    width:200px;
}
</style>

Even if there is a problem with the auto-expanding of the width of the table-cell it can be resolved easy by inserting another div withing the table-cell and giving it a fixed width. Anyway, the over-expanding of the width happens in the case of using extremely long words (which I doubt anyone would use a, let's say, 600px long word) or some div's who's width is greater than the table-cell's width.

The Faux Column Technique is the most popular solution to this problem, but it has some drawbacks such as, you have to resize the background tiled image if you want to resize the columns and it is also not an elegant solution.

The OneTrueLayout Technique consists of creating a padding-bottom of an extreme big height and cut it out by bringing the real border position to the "normal logical position" by applying a negative margin-bottom of the same huge value and hiding the extent created by the padding with overflow:hidden applied to the content wraper. A simplified example would be:

The HTML file:

<html><head>
<style>
.wraper{
    background-color:#CCC;
    overflow:hidden;
}

.floatLeft{
    float:left; 
}

.block{
    padding-bottom:30000px;
    margin-bottom:-30000px;
    width:100px;
    background-color:#06F;
    border:#000 1px solid;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="wraper">
    <div class="block floatLeft">first col</div>
        <div class="block floatLeft">
                Second col<br />Break Line
        </div>
    <div class="block floatLeft">Third col</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

The Layering Technique must be a very neat solution that involves absolute positioning of div's withing a main relative positioned wrapper div. It basically consists of a number of child divs and the main div. The main div has imperatively position: relative to it's css attribute collection. The children of this div are all imperatively position:absolute. The children must have top and bottom set to 0 and left-right dimensions set to accommodate the columns with each another. For example if we have two columns, one of width 100px and the other one of 200px, considering that we want the 100px in the left side and the 200px in the right side, the left column must have {left:0; right:200px} and the right column {left:100px; right:0;}

In my opinion the unimplemented 100% height within an automated height container is a major drawback and the W3C should consider revising this attribute.

Other resources: link1, link2, link3, link4, link5 (important)

share|improve this answer

Make #container to display:inline-block

#container {
height:auto;
width:100%;
display:inline-block;
}

#content {
height: auto;
width:500px;
margin-left:auto;
margin-right:auto;
}

#backgroundContainer {
height:200px; 200px is example, change to what you want
width:100%;
}

Also see: W3Schools

share|improve this answer

Okay so someone is probably going to slap me for this answer, but I use jQuery to solve all my irritating problems and it turns out that I just used something today to fix a similar issue. Assuming you use jquery:

$("#content").sibling("#backgroundContainer").css("height",$("#content").outerHeight());

this is untested but I think you can see the concept here. Basically after it is loaded, you can get the height (outerHeight includes padding + borders, innerHeight for the content only). Hope that helps.

Here is how you bind it to the window resize event:

$(window).resize(function() {
  $("#content").sibling("#backgroundContainer").css("height",$("#content").outerHeight());
});
share|improve this answer
1  
What if JS is turned off? slaps :D Would work though... –  Tim May 6 '10 at 12:20
    
AAAAAH!? they can turn it OFF? hehe. –  Gabriel May 6 '10 at 12:56
    
This won't do unfortunately, even if I was happy with using javascript, if the dynamics of the page change while the user is on it, the jquery script would have to be called again, and that is just asking for unwanted complexity. –  lukewm May 7 '10 at 12:02
    
I edited to indicate the actual complexity involved. –  Gabriel May 8 '10 at 16:22

Somewhere you will need to set a fixed height, instead of using auto everywhere. You will find that if you set a fixed height on your content and/or container, then using auto for things inside it will work.

Also, your boxes will still expand height-wise with more content in, even though you have set a height for it - so don't worry about that :)

#container {
  height:500px;
  min-height:500px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, the container div won't expand according to the content div's height. If the content div contains content that makes it expand to 600px in height, it will simply overflow the container div unless the container div is set to height:auto. –  lukewm May 6 '10 at 10:50
    
Thanks for your effort, any other ideas? –  lukewm May 6 '10 at 10:50

You shouldn't have to set height: 100% at any point if you want your container to fill the page. Chances are, your problem is rooted in the fact that you haven't cleared the floats in the container's children. There are quite a few ways to solve this problem, mainly adding overflow: hidden to the container.

#container { overflow: hidden; }

Should be enough to solve whatever height problem you're having.

share|improve this answer
    
This was genious, so simple at it works perfectly! –  Tom Aug 26 '13 at 8:37

I ended up making 2 display:table;

#container-tv { /* Tiled background */
    display:table;
    width:100%;
    background-image: url(images/back.jpg);
    background-repeat: repeat;  
}
#container-body-background { /* center column but not 100% width */ 
    display:table;
    margin:0 auto;
    background-image:url(images/middle-back.png);
    background-repeat: repeat-y;

}

This made it have a tiled background image with a background image in the middle as a column. It stretches to 100% height of page not just 100% of browser window size

share|improve this answer

Just a quick note because I had a hard time with this.

By using #container { overflow: hidden; } the page I had started to have layout issues in Firefox and IE (when the zoom would go in and out the content would bounce in and out of the parent div).

The solution to this issue is to add a display: inline-block; to the same div with overflow:hidden;

share|improve this answer

Try excluding height from the style element.

i.e. neither give height:100% nor to any other value.

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