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I'm trying to detect if a file exists at runtime, if not, create it. However I'm getting this error when I try to write to it:

The process cannot access the file 'myfile.ext' because it is being used by another process.

string filePath = string.Format(@"{0}\M{1}.dat", ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DirectoryPath"], costCentre); 
if (!File.Exists(filePath)) 
{ 
    File.Create(filePath); 
} 

using (StreamWriter sw = File.AppendText(filePath)) 
{ 
    //write my text 
}

Any ideas on how to fix it?

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Post some code please... –  Lucero May 6 '10 at 13:23

8 Answers 8

up vote 34 down vote accepted

The File.Create method creates the file and opens a FileStream on the file. So your file is already open. You don't really need the file.Create method at all:

string filePath = @"c:\somefilename.txt";
using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(filePath, true))
{
    //write to the file
}

The boolean in the StreamWriter constructor will cause the contents to be appended if the file exists.

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if(!File.Exists(FilePath)){
    File.Create(FilePath).Close();}
    File.WriteAllText(FileText);
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1  
this was useful. –  Siva Oct 1 '11 at 16:03
2  
I love how all the other answers were just way too complicated. People don't realize that there is a simpler answer to every problem. –  Carsen Daniel Yates Nov 23 '11 at 1:08
2  
The downside to this code is that it unnecessarily opens the file twice. Also, it isn't really necessary to check whether the file exists at all, as the FileStream constructor will automatically create it for you if it does not exist, unless you explicitly tell it not to do that. –  reirab Aug 9 '13 at 14:02

When creating a text file you can use the following code:

System.IO.File.WriteAllText("c:\test.txt", "all of your content here");

Using the code from your comment. The file(stream) you created must be closed. File.Create return the filestream to the just created file.:

string filePath = "filepath here";
if (!System.IO.File.Exists(filePath))
{
    System.IO.FileStream f = System.IO.File.Create(filePath);
    f.Close();
}
using (System.IO.StreamWriter sw = System.IO.File.AppendText(filePath))
{ 
    //write my text 
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't seem to have a close option. Here's the code: string filePath = string.Format(@"{0}\M{1}.dat", ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DirectoryPath"], costCentre); if (!File.Exists(filePath)) { File.Create(filePath); } using (StreamWriter sw = File.AppendText(filePath)) { //write my text } –  Brett May 6 '10 at 13:23

File.Create returns a FileStream. You need to close that when you have written to the file:

using (FileStream fs = File.Create(path, 1024)) 
        {
            Byte[] info = new UTF8Encoding(true).GetBytes("This is some text in the file.");
            // Add some information to the file.
            fs.Write(info, 0, info.Length);
        }

You can use using for automatically closing the file.

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I updated your question with the code snippet. After proper indenting, it is immediately clear what the problem is: you use File.Create() but don't close the FileStream that it returns.

Doing it that way is unnecessary, StreamWriter already allows appending to an existing file and creating a new file if it doesn't yet exist. Like this:

  string filePath = string.Format(@"{0}\M{1}.dat", ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DirectoryPath"], costCentre); 
  using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(filePath, true)) {
    //write my text 
  }

Which uses this StreamWriter constructor.

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FileStream fs= File.Create(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["file"]);
fs.Close();
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1  
Welcome to Stackoverflow. You should at least write short description to describe your answer/solution. –  Paresh Mayani Mar 17 at 19:24

This question has already been answered, but here is a real world solution that checks if the directory exists and adds a number to the end if the text file exists. I use this for creating daily log files on a Windows service I wrote. I hope this helps someone.

// How to create a log file with a sortable date and add numbering to it if it already exists.
public void CreateLogFile()
{
    // filePath usually comes from the App.config file. I've written the value explicitly here for demo purposes.
    var filePath = "C:\\Logs";

    // Append a backslash if one is not present at the end of the file path.
    if (!filePath.EndsWith("\\"))
    {
        filePath += "\\";
    }

    // Create the path if it doesn't exist.
    if (!Directory.Exists(filePath))
    {
        Directory.CreateDirectory(filePath);
    }

    // Create the file name with a calendar sortable date on the end.
    var now = DateTime.Now;
    filePath += string.Format("Daily Log [{0}-{1}-{2}].txt", now.Year, now.Month, now.Day);

    // Check if the file that is about to be created already exists. If so, append a number to the end.
    if (File.Exists(filePath))
    {
        var counter = 1;
        filePath = filePath.Replace(".txt", " (" + counter + ").txt");
        while (File.Exists(filePath))
        {
            filePath = filePath.Replace("(" + counter + ").txt", "(" + (counter + 1) + ").txt");
            counter++;
        }
    }

    // Note that after the file is created, the file stream is still open. It needs to be closed
    // once it is created if other methods need to access it.
    using (var file = File.Create(filePath))
    {
        file.Close();
    }
}
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Try this: It works in any case, if the file doesn't exists, it will create it and then write to it. And if already exists, no problem it will open and write to it :

using (FileStream fs= new FileStream(@"File.txt",FileMode.Create,FileAccess.ReadWrite))
{ 
     fs.close();
}
using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(@"File.txt")) 
 { 
    sw.WriteLine("bla bla bla"); 
    sw.Close(); 
 } 
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