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I'm trying to find the name of the class that contains method code.

In the example underneath I use self.__class__.__name__, but of course this returns the name of the class of which self is an instance and not class that contains the test() method code. b.test() will print 'B' while I would like to get 'A'.

I looked into the inspect module documentation but did not find anything directly useful.

class A:
  def __init__(self):
    pass
  def test(self):
    print self.__class__.__name__

class B(A):
  def __init__(self):
    A.__init__(self)



a = A()
b = B()

a.test()
b.test()
share|improve this question
1  
You know this at coding time, no? It's A: def test(self): print "A". – John Kugelman May 6 '10 at 14:26
    
I want to avoid to replicate the class name. If I change the class name from A to AA I'll be the first to forget to adept the print "A" statement. – user266940 May 6 '10 at 14:31
up vote 7 down vote accepted

In Python 3.x, you can simply use __class__.__name__. The __class__ name is mildly magic, and not the same thing as the __class__ attribute of self.

In Python 2.x, there is no good way to get at that information. You can use stack inspection to get the code object, then walk the class hierarchy looking for the right method, but it's slow and tedious and will probably break when you don't want it to. You can also use a metaclass or a class decorator to post-process the class in some way, but both of those are rather intrusive approaches. And you can do something really ugly, like accessing self.__nonexistant_attribute, catching the AttributeError and extracting the class name from the mangled name. None of those approaches are really worth it if you just want to avoid typing the name twice; at least forgetting to update the name can be made a little more obvious by doing something like:

class C:
    ...
    def report_name(self):
        print C.__name__
share|improve this answer

inspect.getmro gives you a tuple of the classes where the method might come from, in order. As soon as you find one of them that has the method's name in its dict, you're done:

for c in inspect.getmro(self.__class__):
    if 'test' in vars(c): break
return c.__name__
share|improve this answer
1  
Unfortunately that gives you the name of the first class in the MRO that has an attribute with that name, which is not necessarily the same as the method you're doing this from (if your method is farther down the MRO.) – Thomas Wouters May 6 '10 at 14:40
    
Nice solution, but as Thomas mentions it does not work when class B overrides the test() method: class A: def init__(self): pass def test(self): import inspect for c in inspect.getmro(self.__class): if 'test' in vars(c): break print c.__name__ class B(A): def __init__(self): A.__init__(self) def test(self): A.test(self) a = A() b = B() a.test() # prints A b.test() # prints B – user266940 May 6 '10 at 14:49
    
sorry for the mess in previous comment. This is my first stackoverflow comment and I was not aware of the inability to add code in comments. – user266940 May 6 '10 at 14:57
1  
@Thomas, exactly. What I don't get is why this behavior is supposed to be wrong: it finds exactly the same class (defining test) as Python attribute access does. – Alex Martelli May 6 '10 at 22:20
1  
Indeed it does, but that doesn't mean it's the answer the OP wanted :) The OP quite clearly asked for "the class this method is defined in", not "the most derived class that defines a method with this name". – Thomas Wouters May 6 '10 at 22:37

Use __dict__ of class object itself:

class A(object):
    def foo(self):
        pass

class B(A):
    pass

def find_decl_class(cls, method):
    if method in cls.__dict__:
        return cls
    for b in cls.__bases__:
        decl = find_decl_class(b, method)
        if decl:
            return decl

print 'foo' in A.__dict__
print 'foo' in B.__dict__
print find_decl_class(B, 'foo').__name__

Will print True, False, A

share|improve this answer
    
This has the same problem as Alex's MRO solution. – Thomas Wouters May 6 '10 at 16:56
    
Agree. But if it is known in advance that there will be just single-class inheritance, solution is OK and simple. Thanks for the note. – nailxx May 6 '10 at 19:29

You can use (abuse?) private name mangling to accomplish this effect. If you look up an attribute on self that starts with __ from inside a method, python changes the name from __attribute to _classThisMethodWasDefinedIn__attribute.

Just somehow stash the classname you want in mangled-form where the method can see it. As an example, we can define a __new__ method on the base class that does it:

def mangle(cls, attrname):
    if not attrname.startswith('__'):
        raise ValueError('attrname must start with __')
    return '_%s%s' % (cls.__name__, attrname)

class A(object):

    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        obj = object.__new__(cls)
        for c in cls.mro():
            setattr(obj, mangle(c, '__defn_classname'), c.__name__)
        return obj

    def __init__(self):
        pass

    def test(self):
        print self.__defn_classname

class B(A):

    def __init__(self):
        A.__init__(self)



a = A()
b = B()

a.test()
b.test()

which prints:

A
A
share|improve this answer

You can do

>>> class A(object):
...   def __init__(self):
...     pass
...   def test(self):
...     for b in self.__class__.__bases__:
...       if hasattr(b, 'test'):
...         return b.__name__
...     return self.__class__.__name__
... 
>>> class B(A):
...   def __init__(self):
...     A.__init__(self)
...
>>> B().test()
'A'
>>> A().test()
'A'
>>> 

Keep in mind that you could simplify it by using __class__.__base__, but if you use multiple inheritance, this version will work better.

It simply checks first on its baseclasses for test. It's not the prettiest, but it works.

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