Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to define a class that accept the pointer to it's parent class as an Argument, but would it be possible to somehow pass it without needing to pass it directly such as:

class Child
{
public:
   Child(Parent* hiddenArg);
};

class Parent
{
public:
   Child myChild;
};

I know this is weird, but I am making my own Signal/Slot implementation and Child would be a signal defined, but I would like to get the parent so I can use it's Event Dispatcher...

share|improve this question
    
such an ugly code! –  Andrey May 6 '10 at 14:35
    
Does Child inherit from Parent? –  Didier Trosset May 6 '10 at 14:36
    
Are you thinking of Java nested classes? They have implicit access to nesting class. –  stefaanv May 6 '10 at 14:36
    
Child does not inherit from Parent. –  JP. May 6 '10 at 14:39
4  
@JP: That makes the use of "Parent" and "Child" confusing. Those terms are, in my experience, used to describe classes in an inheritance hierarchy. Something like "Container" and "Contained" would describe the problem better and not throw people off. –  David Thornley May 6 '10 at 14:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can't do it automatically, but all you need to do is construct myChild in the Parent constructor like this:

Parent::Parent()
  : myChild(this)   // passing pointer to parent to child constructor
{
}

Note some compilers will emit a warning for that code: it thinks you're using the this pointer before the Parent class is fully constructed. As long as you only store the pointer in the Child constructor and don't use it, you're OK. You may legitimately want to disable the warning (try not to disable warnings project-wide though - just around the affected area).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Note that the child constructor should not use the received pointer for anything other than storing it. Passing a pointer to a non fully constructed element (Parent in this case) and storing it is correct, but trying to dereference it is undefined behavior. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 6 '10 at 14:44
    
Would myChild need to be a pointer in the parent class such as Child* myChild or this would work without needing to new it –  JP. May 6 '10 at 14:46
1  
Did you try it? It should work with the code you posted, where myChild is an ordinary member. –  AshleysBrain May 6 '10 at 14:52
    
Thanks a lot, trying it right now –  JP. May 6 '10 at 14:53

If Child is a private, nested class inside parent then this is possible, but I recommend strongly against it. If Child is a public class, then there is no way to do this. How could Child possibly know what object (if any) contains it?

In any case, if the Child class is private to parent, you can derive the parent pointer from the child's this pointer. Something like the following:

class Parent {
public:
     ...

private:
    class Child {
    private:
        Parent * GetParentPointer() {
            return (Parent *)((char *)this - offsetof( Parent, m_child ));
        }
    };

    Child m_child;
 };

And just to reiterate: don't do this. No one will care if you "waste" 4 or 8 bytes on an extra pointer inside child, and the resulting code will be much more maintainable.

share|improve this answer
1  
Is this all defined behavior according to the standard? –  AshleysBrain May 6 '10 at 14:57
    
Wow. It took me a minute to realize that this actually might work, but it's definitely the WRONG solution. I won't downvote it, but no +1 from me! –  Mark Ransom May 6 '10 at 14:59
    
@AshleysBrain, I don't think offsetof is part of the standard. –  Mark Ransom May 6 '10 at 14:59
    
offsetof is an ANSI C macro. In any case, I did recommend against using it twice. But I still think it's pretty cool. ;) –  Peter Ruderman May 6 '10 at 15:16
    
Upvoting this means securing our jobs. –  foraidt May 6 '10 at 15:27

Use a factory

class Parent
{ 
  Parent();

  Child* createChild()
  {
    return new Child(this,...);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Requires all Child classes are on the heap rather than members though. –  AshleysBrain May 6 '10 at 14:54
    
If you are worried about creating things on the heap you should not dabble in C++. This has less caveats and is more readable than some of the other solutions suggested here (including the one that was accepted. I would need a more detailed description of the actual problem to come up with a better solution –  Harald Scheirich May 6 '10 at 18:51
class Child
{
public:
   Child(Parent* hiddenArg = NULL);
};
share|improve this answer
    
How can you access Parent this way? –  stefaanv May 6 '10 at 14:39
    
This doesn't automatically pass the pointer to the parent class to its Child member, though. –  AshleysBrain May 6 '10 at 14:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.