Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a one man show developing a C++ Windows application for a customer. Over the past several months we've been running to the same problems with missing DLL dependencies on customer machines. Despite my best efforts something keeps going wrong and we get angry emails back. My boss and my boss's boss are angry with me and the customers aren't happy.

I'm hoping you guys can help out and give suggestions/ideas on how to get the deliverables in order. Before some of the obvious:

  1. I have no test machine. That is, I can't replicate the customer environment nor attempt to install the app on a "clean" system to catch gotchas before shipping.
  2. I've tried using depends.exe to track down what versions of the DLLs my project is dependent upon. I'm shipping our code with the redistributables I've been able to find that way. After that it's an angry customer email waiting game.
  3. I do have access to a 64-bit machine and 32-bit machine to install new builds. It always works there.
  4. I'm required to use a third-party DLL which can not be registered (it's buggy as hell.)
  5. I'm not supposed to use Install Shield, any other automated installer, or write an install script.
  6. I provide written instructions on how to get the app installed (unzip, double click exe file.)

I'm tired of taking heat for this stuff. What am I missing that I could be doing? What should I ask in terms of support from my employer? How should I ask for that support in a way that they'll provide it?

Update:

Virtual Machine torpedoed. They don't want me spending all of my times setting up and tearing down customer configurations. Instead, I'm now working with the customer to get a base configuration so that I know the exact machine set-up I'm supposed to target. If it's not up to that spec, I no longer have to care. At least something went somewhere... although I'd still like a test machine.

share|improve this question
56  
You could start polishing up your resume and looking for a better job. It looks like they're simultaneously asking you to fix problems while denying you the options to do so. –  erjiang May 6 '10 at 15:42
14  
If the company you work for can't afford $199 for a test machine, what makes you think life is ever going to get better? –  KevinDTimm May 6 '10 at 15:51
3  
Is it always the same missing DLL (or set of DLL's)? Can you visit the customer's site (even if it's just once)? Does it work on some PC's and not on others, or it the case that a new version of your software fails on all of their PC's? –  jon-hanson May 6 '10 at 16:09
1  
@jon hanson - It's a case of some computers it works, other computers it doesn't. Doesn't matter if it's a newer version or older version of my code. And there's several customer sites, each with their own Windows configurations. –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 16:24
5  
The project as it stands is doomed. Maybe you should show your employers this page if they don't believe you. –  Phil Gan May 7 '10 at 9:32

11 Answers 11

up vote 24 down vote accepted

If you don't have a test machine, can you at least use a virtual machine with a clean Windows installation?

share|improve this answer
    
How would I go about asking my employer for one and how much would that cost to get up and running on an XP box? Also, do those work well with licenses? –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 15:39
4  
I would recommend starting with a free one such as Oracle's VirtualBox or Microsoft's VirtualPC. All you need is a Windows license. –  Nemanja Trifunovic May 6 '10 at 15:40
15  
What is the cost of an angry customer vs. a new PC (or virtual machine) –  Max May 6 '10 at 15:41
5  
Download a free copy of VirtualBox and install XP in that. –  bmargulies May 6 '10 at 15:41
3  
Microsoft Virtual PC is free –  C. Lawrence Wenham May 6 '10 at 15:41

You should quit. In your quit letter you should explain why the situation is ridiculous and sets both you and the customer up for frustration. Let's go over the things you've said about your situation:

I have no test machine. That is, I can't replicate the customer environment nor attempt to install the app on a "clean" system to catch gotchas before shipping.

No professional development firm releases products without testing install. We are a very small firm and we have numerous VM's that we run tests on and that we run our installers on.

I've tried using depends.exe to track down what versions of the DLLs my project is dependent upon. I'm shipping our code with the redistributables I've been able to find that way. After that it's an angry customer email waiting game.

I do have access to a 64-bit machine and 32-bit machine to install new builds. It always works there.

These aren't too bad or too strange. It is odd that you don't know what DLL's you're using but there's not much your employers could do for that unless you're maintaining an undocumented legacy system - then it's their fault for not documenting anything.

Unfortunately you've said these systems are not "clean" so it is very easy to lose track of what steps are actually necessary to successfully install the product.

I'm required to use a third-party DLL which can not be registered (it's buggy as hell.)

This happens.

I'm not supposed to use Install Shield, any other automated installer, or write an install script.

I provide written instructions on how to get the app installed (unzip, double click exe file.)

This is utterly insane. Customers are NOT capable of following basic instructions. The fact that you've been told not to use an installer to make the customer's life easier is almost certainly the cause of your problem. You can't tell what they've done. When you ask them they're going to lie or forget what they did...if they ever knew to begin with. Your employers have caused a sever support issue by this edict and the situation is just plain never going to improve for you.

Tie this with the first issue (not having adequate install test platforms) and your product is certain to fail. Your customers SHOULD be mad and you should be as well. The situation your employers have created is not one conducive to development of a successful product. There is, simply put, nothing you can do until these issues are addressed.

share|improve this answer
5  
The "no installer" thing is the biggest point here, for sure. –  Ipsquiggle May 6 '10 at 20:26
I have no test machine. That is, I can't replicate the customer environment
enter code here nor attempt to install the app on a "clean" system to catch
gotchas before shipping.

This type of setup typically never ends well. No matter how good you are there will always be significant differences between your developer machines and the customer machines. For one thing Visual Studio tends to include a shitload of runtimes that it may make your application dependant on without saying anything. Setting up a virtual machine is not very complicated. I use VMWare Workstation to emulate all kinds of different machines. Only requirement is that you have licenses for the operating systems and programs you want to install on the virtual machines. VMWare offer a 30 day free trial and after that I believe $189.

share|improve this answer
2  
VMWare Server is free and offers basically the same thing. –  tstenner May 6 '10 at 18:17

Present it to your boss this way:
A machine for testing installations is far cheaper than a pissed off customer or even your TIME in tracking down issues.

share|improve this answer
    
And credibility = more sales. –  rlb.usa May 6 '10 at 18:03

Other people have given you a big picture answer; here are a couple smaller suggestions that you might find helpful in case you aren't able to take bigger action:

  • list what DLLs your application is dependent on. If you don't know exactly what your application depends on, how can you ensure that the dependencies are available?
  • Write a utility that searches out and logs any instance of those DLLs on a system, along with the DLL version and the system's path. If a user is having problems, this utility might go a long way to helping you troubleshoot the problem, since you've mentioned that you don't have physical or network access to the machines that exhibit the problem.
  • write a utility that does nothing but LoadLibrary() your dependencies. Failures can be logged and at least you'll have an easy way to determine what's wrong on a customers machine.

Hopefully, the common problems will be figured out quickly and fixes made so that they stop being common problems and you'll have less and less need to use these tools. But until you get a handle on the problems they may prove helpful.

Also, in one comment you mention that the problem is caused by Windows system DLLs - these should generally cause few "DLL hell" problems on modern systems, since 3rd party software (including yours) is generally unable to replace these. All Windows systems should get what MS provides, and MS is pretty good (though not necessarily perfect) about making new ones backwards compatible. If these are causing you problems, you might want to post details of which DLLs they are (and maybe versions) so people can answer with more specifics, like what might need to be configured to ensure that Windows setup installs the DLL.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea about the test utilities. Before the user runs the app for the first time, have them run the "load libraries" test utility to check for any obvious problems. If that app gives them an error message, then they can run the "DLL-finder" utility and send the results to you. That approach gives customers the feeling that you have an established method for handling compatibility problems. I always hate to have end-users performing tests like this that should be run before the software is ever shipped, but given your restrictions I don't think you have a lot of options. –  bta May 6 '10 at 17:54
    
This is a fantastic solution. I think I will write a small Python script to do just this. On the flip side, the Microsoft libraries are a real puzzle. On one machine they listed "msjava.dll" as a missing dependency they were missing yet my 64 bit machine lacks this very DLL. –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 18:00
    
I believe msjava.dll is no longer on Windows machines due to the MS/Sun Java settlement from several years back. The DependencyWalker FAQ talks a little about msjava.dll (just technical issues that may be of interest/help to you): dependencywalker.com/faq.html –  Michael Burr May 6 '10 at 18:19
2  
@wheaties: you should also take care to deal with (or at least be aware of) SysWOW64 redirection issues if your app and/or or tools are 32-bit processes that may run on Win64 machines. –  Michael Burr May 6 '10 at 18:21

Could some of your dependencies be statically linked instead?

share|improve this answer
    
I wish. These are Microsoft DLLs which are a part of Windows. Do you know of a way to statically link these? If you do, that would save me a great deal of effort. –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 16:08
3  
If these DLL's are part of Windows, how are they missing? If they are other Microsoft DLL's (msvcrt, mfc..., etc.) then you should statically link them. Saves you from installation issues and version validation. –  tames May 6 '10 at 17:58

Do you include the specific DLLs in your install?

If so, this is the wrong way to go about it. Instead, you should include the MS redistributable pack for your compiler. For example, if you compile using MSVC 8.0 SP1, you would get this pack and install it with your app:

Microsoft Visual C++ 2008 SP1 Redistributable Package (x86)

Each MSCV version (including SP level) has its own redist package. Make sure you get the right one for your compiler.

After you put the fire out, sit down with your boss and convince them that if you're going to pretend to be a software company, you have to act like one. Get a real production environment. This isn't a high school programming club, it's your livlihood.

EDIT: Just to be clear. Once you get the redist, dont unpack it to your machine and then include the encosed DLLs in your setup. Instead, include the entire redist installer as a sub-step of your install. Install the redist first, then install your code.

share|improve this answer
    
I send the entire redistributable exe. I don't unpack it and send the dlls themselves. And yes, I've got the right C++ redist package. –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 18:17
    
@wheaties: are your dll conflicts with the redist dlls? or other dlls? –  John Dibling May 6 '10 at 18:21

only for review: You have this redistributable package? http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=9b2da534-3e03-4391-8a4d-074b9f2bc1bf&displaylang=en

It helps for me.

share|improve this answer
3  
I'm on VS2005, not 2008. I wish I was on a more up to date VS but they won't spend the money unless a contract dictates it. Btw, welcome to SO and thanks for contributing. –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 17:30

You could ask the customer for VPN access or something similar so you could use their environment.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue is that some of the computers they're installing these applications on are off the net and have to stay off the net. –  wheaties May 6 '10 at 16:09

If you pass a full, absolute path to LoadLibrary(), it will only look in that exact location for the DLL. You may be able to use this to get around some of your problems. Package all the DLLs your app needs inside a "lib" folder and include it in the zip file with your program. As long as the "lib" folder lives in the same folder as the .exe, you can use GetCurrentDirectory to construct absolute paths to those libraries and ensure that the libs being loaded are the same ones that you were using when you tested the software. However, if you are using a library that you don't have the rights to redistribute, then this method isn't very helpful.

share|improve this answer

I'd check out the VMWare. It's a pretty cool virtual machine, and you could probably mimic the customer's environment.

Also, I'd have a word with your boss. It's entirely possible that they're under the assumption that the product you shipped has been tested thoroughly by you. So it's probably a miscommunication, and I would talk with him just to be sure. If you boss is failing to understand your point, I would most definitely consider quitting because what would happen is that he would claim that he had to "talk to you" and "set you straight" whenever the product became successful. It's entirely possible that in your review, he'd put down that you were uncooperative or worst. So my best is to talk, then form a decision based on that on whether or not you should continue with the company.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.