Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know this has been answered before, but it seems that executing the script directly "python filename.py" does not work. I have Python 2.6.2 on SuSE Linux.

Code:

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from multiprocessing import Pool
p = Pool(1)
def f(x):
    return x*x
p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])

Command line:

> python example.py
Process PoolWorker-1:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/process.py", line 231, in _bootstrap
    self.run()
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/process.py", line 88, in run
    self._target(*self._args, **self._kwargs)
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/pool.py", line 57, in worker
    task = get()
File "/usr/lib/python2.6/multiprocessing/queues.py", line 339, in get
    return recv()
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'f'
share|improve this question
    
    
@jb. that post is much later than this one, this was 2010, that one is 2013 –  gatoatigrado Aug 18 at 23:26
    
Age is irrevelant there is consensus on meta that question with better answer should be chosen, and another one has IMO better answer. –  jb. Aug 19 at 7:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Restructure your code so that the f() function is defined before you create instance of Pool. Otherwise the worker cannot see your function.

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(x):
    return x*x

p = Pool(1)
p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])
share|improve this answer
1  
awesome, thank you so much!! What cryptic usage! –  gatoatigrado May 7 '10 at 0:21
1  
NOTE: A few years later, I've started writing an imap alternative [ github.com/gatoatigrado/vimap ], which makes this mistake more difficult (and makes it clear when threads are forked). –  gatoatigrado Jun 13 '13 at 22:29
    
@Bartosz, Do you have any idea why this is not a problem in ipython notebooks? –  Framester Oct 7 at 9:33

This one works:

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
from multiprocessing import Pool

def f(x):
    return x*x

if __name__ == "__main__":
    p = Pool(1)
    p.map(f, [1, 2, 3])

I'm not 100% sure why your code does not work, but I guess the reason is that child processes launched by the multiprocessing module try to import the main module (to have access to the methods you defined), and the if __name__ == "__main__" stanza is required not to execute the initialization code where you set up your pool.

share|improve this answer

One possibility is that your python file has the same name as a module:

  • test.py
  • test/
    • __init__.py

in pickle.py, you have the error coming from:

    def find_class(self, module, name):
      # Subclasses may override this
      __import__(module)
      mod = sys.modules[module] # <- here mod will reference your test/__init__.py
      klass = getattr(mod, name)
      return klass
share|improve this answer

The problem I had was solved by using if __name__ == "__main__" as pointed out by Tamás; in Eclipse for Windows the examples do not work under the interpreter. This is explained in http://docs.python.org/2/library/multiprocessing

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.