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I have a large number of rows that I would like to copy, but I need to change one field.

I can select the rows that I want to copy:

select * from Table where Event_ID = "120"

Now I want to copy all those rows and create new rows while setting the Event_ID to 155. How can I accomplish this?

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up vote 103 down vote accepted
INSERT INTO Table
          ( Event_ID
          , col2
           ...
          )
     SELECT "155"
          , col2
           ...
      FROM Table WHERE Event_ID = "120"

Here, the col2, ... represent the remaining columns (the ones other than Event_ID) in your table.

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7  
is there any way to do it without having to specify the column names? – Andrew May 6 '10 at 18:00
2  
Not that I'm aware of. Of course, if your table has like 1000 columns or something and you don't want to type them all, then you could write a SQL statement to build your SQL statement :). The way you would do it would be to use the information_schema to get the column names for the table. But that's really overkill, I'd just type out the column names. – dcp May 6 '10 at 18:21
1  
exactly the example I needed, thanks. I wasn't sure if you could do it that way. – salonMonsters Nov 29 '10 at 20:35
    
Worked perfectly - thanks! – dadwithkids Oct 15 '13 at 2:35
    
Would this be possible using an asterisk to get the remaining columns? – Peter Apr 14 '15 at 13:44

This is a solution where you have many fields in your table and don't want to get a finger cramp from typing all the fields, just type the ones needed :)

How to copy some rows into the same table, with some fields having different values:

  1. Create a temporary table with all the rows you want to copy
  2. Update all the rows in the temporary table with the values you want
  3. If you have an auto increment field, you should set it to NULL in the temporary table
  4. Copy all the rows of the temporary table into your original table
  5. Delete the temporary table

Your code:

CREATE table temporary_table AS SELECT * FROM original_table WHERE Event_ID="155";

UPDATE temporary_table SET Event_ID="120";

UPDATE temporary_table SET ID=NULL

INSERT INTO original_table SELECT * FROM temporary_table;

DROP TABLE temporary_table

General scenario code:

CREATE table temporary_table AS SELECT * FROM original_table WHERE <conditions>;

UPDATE temporary_table SET <fieldx>=<valuex>, <fieldy>=<valuey>, ...;

UPDATE temporary_table SET <auto_inc_field>=NULL;

INSERT INTO original_table SELECT * FROM temporary_table;

DROP TABLE temporary_table

Simplified/condensed code:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temporary_table AS SELECT * FROM original_table WHERE <conditions>;

UPDATE temporary_table SET <auto_inc_field>=NULL, <fieldx>=<valuex>, <fieldy>=<valuey>, ...;

INSERT INTO original_table SELECT * FROM temporary_table;

As creation of the temporary table uses the TEMPORARY keyword it will be dropped automatically when the session finishes (as @ar34z suggested).

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Thanks, Alex. This code worked for me. – TecBrat Aug 6 '13 at 15:49
5  
MySQL supports the TEMPORARY keyword to create temporary tables. Usage of CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE will automagically drop the table when the session (a serie of SQL queries) is finished. Dropping the table wouldn't be necessary and it doesn't conflict with other temporary tables using the same name. (e.g. when live hacking (which I wouldn't recommend)) – ar34z Aug 13 '14 at 8:52
    
this code only works if you user #temporary_table instead of temporary_table, maybe a MSSQL issue? – TruthOf42 Dec 18 '14 at 18:23
    
That's what i was looking for. Thank you! – HddnTHA Feb 18 '15 at 10:57
2  
This basically worked perfectly for me, but I did have to overcome a Not Null constraint on the primary key in the temp table that seems to get copied from the original table. I fixed this by altering the temp table before the update as follows: ALTER TABLE temporary_table MODIFY <auto_inc_not_null_field> INT; Then the update of the primary key to Null would not fail. – snorris Oct 11 '15 at 5:16

Let's say your table has two other columns: foo and bar

INSERT INTO Table (foo, bar, Event_ID)
SELECT foo, bar, "155"
  FROM Table
 WHERE Event_ID = "120"
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2  
is there any way to do it without having to specify the column names? – Andrew May 6 '10 at 18:00
    
Thanks! Your solution did it for me. :) – Woppi May 29 '14 at 2:21
    
Good example, short sweet and complete! – Mike_K Oct 2 '14 at 19:56

If you have loads of columns in your table and don't want to type out each one you can do it using a temporary table, like;

SELECT *
INTO #Temp
FROM Table WHERE Event_ID = "120"
GO

UPDATE #TEMP
SET Column = "Changed"
GO

INSERT INTO Table
SELECT *
FROM #Temp
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2  
a note : this assumes that you have no primary key in your table – kommradHomer Jul 25 '14 at 7:33

Hey how about to copy all fields, change one of them to the same value + something else.

INSERT INTO Table (foo, bar, Event_ID)
SELECT foo, bar, Event_ID+"155"
  FROM Table
 WHERE Event_ID = "120"

??????????

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As long as Event_ID is Integer, do this:

INSERT INTO Table (foo, bar, Event_ID)
SELECT foo, bar, (Event_ID + 155)
  FROM Table
WHERE Event_ID = "120"
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