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I've grown up as a programmer using MySQL all the way. Recently, I started changing some of our applications to support MS SQL Server as an alternative backend. One of the compatibility issues I ran into is the use of MySQL's CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE to create in-memory tables that hold data for very fast access during a session with no need for permanent storage.

What is the equivalent in MS SQL? A requirement is that I need to be able to use the temporary table just like any other, especially JOIN it with the permanent ones.

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I hope you are aware that in MySQL, user-created temporary tables are not in-memory by default! Only if you specify ENGINE=MEMORY in the CREATE TABLE statement, the table will be in memory. Otherwise the temporary table will be created with the default storage engine, which is most likely MyISAM or INNODB, and saved on disk. Do not confuse user-created with internal temporary tables which are created by MySQL during complex joins. Those are created in memory, if possible. –  dr fu manchu May 20 at 11:39

9 Answers 9

up vote 11 down vote accepted

@Keith

This is a common misconception: Table variables are NOT necessarily stored in memory. In fact SQL Server decides whether to keep the variable in memory or to spill it to TempDB. There is no reliable way (at least in SQL Server 2005) to ensure that table data is kept in memory. For more detailed info look here

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You can create table variables (in memory), and two different types of temp table:

--visible only to me, in memory (SQL 2000 and above only)
declare @test table (
    Field1 int,
    Field2 nvarchar(50)
);

--visible only to me, stored in tempDB
create table #test (
    Field1 int,
    Field2 nvarchar(50)
)

--visible to everyone, stored in tempDB
create table ##test (
    Field1 int,
    Field2 nvarchar(50)
)


Edit:

Following feedback I think this needs a little clarification.

#table and ##table will always be in TempDB.

@Table variables will normally be in memory, but are not guaranteed to be. SQL decides based on the query plan, and uses TempDB if it needs to.

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You can declare a "table variable" in SQL Server 2005, like this:

declare @foo table (
    Id int,
    Name varchar(100)
);

You then refer to it just like a variable:

select * from @foo f
    join bar b on b.Id = f.Id

No need to drop it - it goes away when the variable goes out of scope.

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A good blog post here but basically prefix local temp tables with # and global temp with ## - eg

CREATE TABLE #localtemp
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The syntax you want is:

create table #tablename

The # prefix identifies the table as a temporary table.

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CREATE TABLE #tmptablename

Use the hash/pound sign prefix

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I disagree with what is said.

Yes, SQL Server manage @table, #table and ##table (and table of course).

But this 3 (or 4) table types are VEREY DIFFERENT of a MEMORY TABLE.

MySQL don't drop a MEMORY TABLE. SQL Server drop @table, #table and ##table (@table in proc, #table in request and ##table in session of creator).

SQL Server NOT SUPPORT memory tables. None of previous table types is equivalent to MySQL memory table (a pity really).

Does not need?, SQL Server run very, very, good (for me). But a especific declaration for it would be good.

Regards.

(I've been programming SQL Server for 10 years ago).

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1  
Note that the way this site works, there's no guarantee on the order in which the postings are going to appear at any later point in time. I think you and Chris Musasizi were trying to "respond" to each other, but the course of the conversation is practically impossible to follow for future readers. You should comment on each other's post, include links to the posts you are referring to, or refer to the question only, whatever is most appropriate. Also not that responses will notify the question owner while comments notify the owner of the post that's commented on. –  Hanno Fietz Sep 9 '09 at 15:45

It's unfortunate that you did not state what you disagree with.

To comment on the previous post, definitely each database platform has different ways it handles tables, memory and different objects.

To understand the SQL server platform, kindly read the article below:

http://blogs.msdn.com/sqlserverstorageengine/archive/2008/03/30/sql-server-table-variable-vs-local-temporary-table.aspx

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Note that the way this site works, there's no guarantee on the order in which the postings are going to appear at any later point in time. I think you and jbarco were trying to "respond" to each other, but the course of the conversation is practically impossible to follow for future readers. You should comment on each other's post, include links to the posts you are referring to, or refer to the question only, whatever is most appropriate. Also not that responses will notify the question owner while comments notify the owner of the post that's commented on. –  Hanno Fietz Sep 9 '09 at 15:43

I understand what you're trying to achieve. Welcome to the world of a variety of databases!

SQL server 2000 supports temporary tables created by prefixing a # to the table name, making it a locally accessible temporary table (local to the session) and preceding ## to the table name, for globally accessible temporary tables e.g #MyLocalTable and ##MyGlobalTable respectively.

SQL server 2005 and above support both temporary tables (local, global) and table variables - watch out for new functionality on table variables in SQL 2008 and release two! The difference between temporary tables and table variables is not so big but lies in the the way the database server handles them.

I would not wish to talk about older versions of SQL server like 7, 6, though I have worked with them and it's where I came from anyway :-)

It’s common to think that table variables always reside in memory but this is wrong. Depending on memory usage and the database server volume of transactions, a table variable's pages may be exported from memory and get written in tempdb and the rest of the processing takes place there (in tempdb).

Please note that tempdb is a database on an instance with no permanent objects in nature but it’s responsible for handling workloads involving side transactions like sorting, and other processing work which is temporary in nature. On the other hand, table variables (usually with smaller data) are kept in memory (RAM) making them faster to access and therefore less disk IO in terms of using the tempdb drive when using table variables with smaller data compared to temporary tables which always log in tempdb.

Table variables cannot be indexed while temporary tables (both local and global) can be indexed for faster processing in case the amount of data is large. So you know your choice in case of faster processing with larger data volumes by temporary transactions. It's also worth noting that transactions on table variables alone are not logged and can't be rolled back while those done on temporary tables can be rolled back!

In summary, table variables are better for smaller data while temporary tables are better for larger data being processed temporarily. If you also want proper transaction control using transaction blocks, table variables are not an option for rolling back transactions so you're better off with temporary tables in this case.

Lastly, temporary tables will always increase disk IO since they always use tempdb while table variables may not increase it, depending on the memory stress levels.

Let me know if you want tips on how to tune your tempdb to earn much faster performance to go above 100%!

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Chris, why don't you set up an SO account? –  Hanno Fietz Sep 9 '09 at 15:44
    
@Chris - please leave the religious tag lines off the end of your post. Also the self promotional stuff belongs in your profile, not at the end of your post. –  slugster Mar 22 '11 at 10:29

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