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Normally, I've seen prototype functions declared outside the class definition, like this:

function Container(param) {
    this.member = param;
}
Container.prototype.stamp = function (string) {
    return this.member + string;
}

var container1 = new Container('A');
alert(container1.member);
alert(container1.stamp('X'));

This code produces two alerts with the values "A" and "AX".

I'd like to define the prototype function INSIDE of the class definition. Is there anything wrong with doing something like this?

function Container(param) {
    this.member = param;
    if (!Container.prototype.stamp) {
        Container.prototype.stamp = function() {
            return this.member + string;
        }
    }
}

I was trying this so that I could access a private variable in the class. But I've discovered that if my prototype function references a private var, the value of the private var is always the value that was used when the prototype function was INITIALLY created, not the value in the object instance:

Container = function(param) {
    this.member = param;
    var privateVar = param;
    if (!Container.prototype.stamp) {
        Container.prototype.stamp = function(string) {
            return privateVar + this.member + string;
        }
    }
}
var container1 = new Container('A');
var container2 = new Container('B');
alert(container1.stamp('X'));
alert(container2.stamp('X'));

This code produces two alerts with the values "AAX" and "ABX". I was hoping the output would be "AAX" and "BBX". I'm curious why this doesn't work, and if there is some other pattern that I could use instead.

EDIT: Note that I fully understand that for this simple example it would be best to just use a closure like this.stamp = function() {} and not use prototype at all. That's how I would do it too. But I was experimenting with using prototype to learn more about it and would like to know a few things:

  • When does it make sense to use prototype functions instead of closures? I've only needed to use them to extend existing objects, like Date. I've read that closures are faster.
  • If I need to use a prototype function for some reason, is it "OK" to define it INSIDE the class, like in my example, or should it be defined outside?
  • I'd like to understand why the privateVar value of each instance is not accessible to the prototype function, only the first instance's value.
share|improve this question
    
Closures striked again … –  Dormilich May 6 '10 at 22:09
2  
Read up on closures (jibbering.com/faq/faq_notes/closures.html) for detailed reasons why your code behaves the way it does. –  outis May 6 '10 at 22:09

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

When does it make sense to use prototype functions instead of closures?

Well, it's the most lightweight way to go, let's say you have a method in the prototype of certain constructor, and you create 1000 object instances, all those objects will have your method in their prototype chain, and all of them will refer to only one function object.

If you initialize that method inside the constructor, e.g. (this.method = function () {};), all of your 1000 object instances will have a function object as own property.

If I need to use a prototype function for some reason, is it "OK" to define it INSIDE the class, like in my example, or should it be defined outside?

Defining the members of a constructor's prototype inside itself, doesn't makes much sense, I'll explain you more about it and why your code doesn't works.

I'd like to understand why the privateVar value of each instance is not accessible to the prototype function, only the first instance's value.

Let's see your code:

var Container = function(param) {
    this.member = param;
    var privateVar = param;
    if (!Container.prototype.stamp) {  // <-- executed on the first call only
        Container.prototype.stamp = function(string) {
            return privateVar + this.member + string;
        }
    }
}

The key point about your code behavior is that the Container.prototype.stamp function is created on the first method invocation.

At the moment you create a function object, it stores the current enclosing scope in an internal property called [[Scope]].

This scope is later augmented when you call the function, by the identifiers (variables) declared within it using var or a FunctionDeclaration.

A list of [[Scope]] properties forms the scope chain, and when you access an identifier (like your privateVar variable), those objects are examined.

And since your function was created on the first method invocation (new Container('A')), privateVar is bound to the Scope of this first function call, and it will remain bound to it no matter how do you call the method.

Give a look to this answer, the first part is about the with statement, but in the second part I talk about how the scope chain works for functions.

share|improve this answer
    
@CMS: Great explanation, thanks so much! So if my prototype function only accesses this and not private vars, then it would work properly, even though it is defined INSIDE the class, right? Is there any drawback to doing it that way instead of declaring the prototype function after the class like I typically see? –  Tauren May 7 '10 at 1:38
    
@Tauren, yes, there is a drawback, you will have a memory leak, for example in your code, all the variables declared in the first invocation within your constructor will be not garbage collected, because as you know now, the enclosing scope from where the Container.prototype.stamp function is created remains accessible even after the constructor ends its execution (a closure created). For that reason, some libraries like Google's Closure avoid closures for private members, they stick simply with naming conventions, e.g. obj.__privateMember. –  CMS May 7 '10 at 2:12
    
makes perfect sense, thanks! –  Tauren May 7 '10 at 5:16

Sorry for resurrecting an old question, but I wanted to add something that I recently discovered somewhere else here on SO (looking for the link, will edit/add it once I find it): found it.

I personally like the below methodology because I can visually group all my prototype and 'instance' definitions together with the function definition, while avoiding evaluating them more than once. It also provides an opportunity to do closures with your prototype methods, which can be useful for creating 'private' variables shared by different prototype methods.

var MyObject = (function () {
    // Note that this variable can be closured with the 'instance' and prototype methods below
    var outerScope = function(){};

    // This function will ultimately be the "constructor" for your object
    function MyObject() {
        var privateVariable = 1; // both of these private vars are really closures specific to each instance
        var privateFunction = function(){};
        this.PublicProtectedFunction = function(){ };
    }

    // "Static" like properties/functions, not specific to each instance but not a prototype either
    MyObject.Count = 0;

    // Prototype declarations
    MyObject.prototype.someFunction = function () { };
    MyObject.prototype.someValue = 1;

    return MyObject;
})(); 

// note we do automatic evalution of this function, which means the 'instance' and prototype definitions 
// will only be evaluated/defined once.  Now, everytime we do the following, we get a new instance
// as defined by the 'function MyObject' definition inside

var test = new MyObject();
share|improve this answer
    
that's a pretty cool idea, thanks for sharing it! –  Tauren Nov 20 '10 at 12:59

You need to put the function on each specific instance instead of the prototype, like this:

Container = function(param) {
    this.member = param;
    var privateVar = param;

    this.stamp = function(string) {
        return privateVar + this.member + string;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Slaks: I've revised the question to be more clear on what exactly I'm asking. –  Tauren May 6 '10 at 22:22

To get the behavior you want you need to assign each individual object separate stamp() functions with unique closures:

Container = function(param) {
    this.member = param;
    var privateVar = param;
    this.stamp = function(string) {
        return privateVar + this.member + string;
    }
}

When you create a single function on the prototype each object uses the same function, with the function closing over the very first Container's privateVar.

By assigning this.stamp = ... each time the constructor is called each object will get its own stamp() function. This is necessary since each stamp() needs to close over a different privateVar variable.

share|improve this answer
    
@John: Thanks for your answer. My question wasn't clear enough I guess, so I revised it. Please take a look at the edit. –  Tauren May 6 '10 at 22:23

That is because privateVar is not a private member of the object, but part of stamp's closure. You could get the effect by always creating the function:

Container = function(param) {
    this.member = param;
    var privateVar = param;
    this.stamp = function(string) {
      return privateVar + this.member + string;
    }
}

The value of privateVar is set when the function is built, so you need to create it each time.

EDIT: modified not to set the prototype.

share|improve this answer
    
@Kathy: Thanks, I agree a closure is the way to go. Please see my edited question, as I added more details about what exactly I'm trying to ask. –  Tauren May 6 '10 at 22:21
    
@Tauren The reason why the variable was only set to the first privateVar is that the function was only created once, so the closure was only created once. –  Kathy Van Stone May 6 '10 at 22:59
    
thanks for the clarification, I see what's happening now. –  Tauren May 7 '10 at 1:30
    
Note: In this case since the stamp function is being re-declared every time the constructor runs, the privateVar, accessible within the stamp method, will refer always to the value in the scope of the last instantiated object for any instance. –  CMS May 7 '10 at 3:50
    
@CMS - you're right -- I'll modify the code to set stamp directly on this. –  Kathy Van Stone May 7 '10 at 17:27

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