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I was asked in an interview : how to convert 0 to 1 and 1 to 0. I answered :

  1. Simple if and switch
  2. Bit flipping.

Are there any other approach?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "bit flipping", specifically? – dash-tom-bang May 6 '10 at 22:39
4  
Didn't knew that Java is language agnostic. Cool. – BalusC May 6 '10 at 22:42
    
@Balus: natural-language-agnostic maybe ;-) – Joey May 6 '10 at 22:43
    
Well, java code is preferred, but this is really not about java. – javaguy May 6 '10 at 22:52
1  
drelihan: It's a test to see if they're an architecture astronaut, or a programmer. They're looking to see if you draw a UML diagram and start talking about WSDL. – Ken May 7 '10 at 1:16

10 Answers 10

up vote 23 down vote accepted

A few obvious possibilities:

!n
1-n
n^1
n==0
n!=1
n<1
share|improve this answer
1  
!n isn't reliably 1 => 0, 0 => 1 in a language agnostic way (in some languages, !0 = -1); in Java, it doesn't even work ("operator ! cannot be applied to int"). – T.J. Crowder May 6 '10 at 22:45
1  
@T.J.Crowder:quite true -- almost no notation you can use is truly language agnostic. I don't think any of these is legal Scheme -- so of course I wrote in the one true language and ignored the "Java" tag as an obvious mistake. :-) – Jerry Coffin May 6 '10 at 22:53
3  
@Totophil , ^ is the xor operator in most languages. – Brandon Bodnar May 6 '10 at 23:05
4  
Of these, only 1-n and n xor 1 are language agnostic in the sense that they deal with integer values. All others mix integers with boolean results, making them unsuitable for strongly-typed languages. – Schedler May 6 '10 at 23:32
2  
@Totophil: if ^ is the power operator, then 0 ^ 0 is undefined (mathematically, see mathworld.wolfram.com/Power.html). – Greg Hewgill May 7 '10 at 0:12

Simple arithmetic:

x = 1 - x;

Actually, there are an infinite number of polynomials that will map 1 to 0 and vice versa. For example:

x = x * x * x * x * x - x * x * x * x + x * x - 2 * x + 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Simplifies to x^5 - x^4 + x^2 - 2x + 1. But x^n = x for x = 0 or 1, so it further simplifies to x - x + x -2x + 1 which is just 1 - x. (In case anyone was unsure if they could actually use the second polynomial.) – pkr298 Aug 11 '15 at 21:15

Lookup table:

int[] swap = { 1, 0 };

And later:

x = swap[x];
share|improve this answer
    
What's wrong with this? The OP asked for any alternative methods. – Wallacoloo May 6 '10 at 23:50
    
Yeah, seriously. – Sean May 6 '10 at 23:59
2  
This is a totally awesome answer. I like it because its the least mathematical. Also unlike the other answers this will fail if the domain and range are outside of 0-1 ala fail fast although not gracefully. +1 – Adam Gent May 8 '10 at 13:45

they probably expected you to use bitwise NOT

share|improve this answer

Take a paper clip. Straighten it out. It's a 1. Bend it to meet its ends. It's a 0. To make it a 1, straighten it.

share|improve this answer
1  
Genius! Need more of this. – fastcodejava May 7 '10 at 6:15
1  
I don't think Java is powerful enough to do that. – Adam Gent May 8 '10 at 2:12
    
@Adam: You probably need to find an embedded robot lisp to really do the job right. Only Embedded Robot Lisps have the power to truly transform 0s into 1s and vice-versa. – Paul Nathan May 8 '10 at 3:25

Some Trig: COS(PI * N)^2

In python

import math
math.cos(math.pi * n)  ** 2

I can't believe people forgot modulus:

(3 + n) % 2
share|improve this answer
    
Also, cos(n*pi/2) – Greg Hewgill May 7 '10 at 1:01
    
+1: I love it ! – Dinah May 7 '10 at 13:55

This one isn't the best, but it works:

pow(0, n);
share|improve this answer
    
pow(0, 0) is mathematically undefined, see mathworld.wolfram.com/Power.html – Greg Hewgill May 7 '10 at 0:21
1  
Is Stephen Wolfram some kind of authority on math? Take a look at this article to see a few differing opinions: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exponentiation#Zero_to_the_zero_power – advs89 May 7 '10 at 1:24
    
@Adam Doyle: Yeah, count on Wikipedia to present all points of view simultaneously. It's the internet equivalent of the Total Perspective Vortex. – Greg Hewgill May 7 '10 at 10:27
    
I like this explanation betterexplained.com/articles/… – Dinah May 7 '10 at 13:05
    
It depends on what kind of math you are doing and kind of comes down to the question is there a "GUT" for math which I believe Godel made doubtful. A good book on this is "Is God a Mathematician?" amazon.com/God-Mathematician-Mario-Livio/dp/074329405X I mean there are even some philosophers/mathematicians that think we should discount induction. – Adam Gent May 8 '10 at 13:38

I guess you could do ABS(VAR - 1) but i think your approaches are more elegant

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I've used -~-n in JavaScript. It converts 1 to -1 which is represented as 11111111, then flips the bits to 00000000 which is 0. The second negative sign does not affect the 0. On the other hand, if n is 0, the first negative sign has no effect, the tilde flips the bits, and the second negative sign converts -1 to 1.

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This should work for any two numbers...

(EDIT: looking at the other answers I may have misread the question... but I still like my answer :-)

public class X
{
    public static void main(final String[] argv)
    {
        int x = Integer.parseInt(argv[0]);
        int y = Integer.parseInt(argv[1]);

        x += y;
        y = x - y;
        x = x - y;

        System.out.println(x);
        System.out.println(y);
    }
}
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