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So I was thinking about bloopers I've made or have seen made in a Unix systems and was wondering what others think the worst blooper they made was?

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73 Answers

My first Linux install....

I installed on a partition and then was reading along to where it suggested installing another version of some file having to do with command processing (long ago, can't remember the details). In those days, I had a habit of never typing "mv A B" while logged in as root, after having gotten the source and destination mixed up, so I typed "rm B" automatically, to be followed up with "mv A B". The second command never made it.

Fortunately, since I had just installed, I lost nothing but a bit of time reinstalling.

I was young and foolish back then. I'm older now, anyway.

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About 10 years ago I was on an unused server at my job. I forget the flavor of Unix, but I wanted to copy some files before I updated something, and made a typo that looked like

cp /usr/lib /usr/lib

which basically copies the folder over itself, which turn every file into 0 bytes, and because it was an OS folder, instant system death.

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My biggest one has probably been fsck -n on /home, a live ext3 filesystem. Hey, it's not going to make any changes, it should be safe, right? Apparently not. It forced me to reboot; the fsck on reboot "fixed" the damage by (a) noting every inode was not deleted, yet had no name and thus linking every inode to lost+found. With such useful names as the inode number. But I keep backups, and it was just my personal machine, so it wasn't that bad.

I once had fun with rm * .o (note the typo) a long time ago, but due to CVS, it wasn't that big a deal either.

I took down a small ISP once — including my connection to the router — once by breaking OSPF horribly. I managed to get enough static routes in to fix that without a drive to the colocation centre.

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I was working with a broken Fedora Core 6 installation and wanted to reinstall a broken package. Unfortunately, one of its dependencies was libstdc++.so.

So, I tried to remove the package that contained that file and in doing so, I wasn't able to run any new commands to reinstall it...

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I wrote an automated script to build a bootable flash drive from a source tree on the hard disk. At the end it installs LILO on the drive.

One day I somehow screwed it up and it trashed the bootloader on my main hard disk. No problem, I thought, I'd just go and fix it with a live CD after I did the flash drive. So I got in there and saw LILO had stored a backup of the MBR in /boot/. I dd'ed it onto the hard drive and rebooted. That's where I found out that was the MBR from the flash drive.

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A friend of mine was in the administration team for the students' network. He was into computers, but a bit new to that thing called "Linux".

He was logged in on the server (let's call it darkstar), working on files mounted over Samba from the Windows server next room. Once he was through with his stuff, he decided the mount point wasn't canonical enough by his standards, he should move it someplace else. "Easy! I'll just unmount it from there and remount it in the new location."

Except unmount isn't how Linux calls it.

$ unmount /mount/point
bash: unmount: command not found
$ rmdir /mount/point
rmdir: `/mount/point': Directory not empty
$ rm -rf /mount/point
rm: cannot remove `/mount/point': Permission denied
$ su -
Password:
# rm -rf /mount/point

It turns out, he knew just enough to be dangerous. The funny part, retrospectively, is that it took long enough for him to get suspicious and think "that's not right". But he didn't know about ^C yet.

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I was modifying a network script for an embedded system where I was only able to send one command at a time. It was a painful learning experience in playing with sed and AWK. Since I was unsure the resulting file would be correct, I piped all my changes to a temporary file which I downloaded and checked for correctness after all was done. The file contents were all okay, so I moved the script to the correct place and rebooted the system.

After waiting for what seemed like forever, it started to dawn on me that the system was probably not coming back up again, so I tried reproducing it locally which is what I should have begun with anyway. It turned out that the script needed the execute flag set, and since I just piped changes into a temporary file and then moved it to the appropriate location, it did not have the execute flag set.

Big oopsie and it cost us some money since we had to send out a technician to replace the entire box. At least I learnt never to modify remote systems without trying it locally first.

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I deleted a symbolic link to my /usr folder, but I did rm symlink/ instead of rm symlink due to tab completion. This was before I added a regular user to my freshly installed Linux box. I spent the next week using the computer and fixing problems as they cropped up. Eventually got sick of it. Lesson? Watch what you do as root. Always.

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I'm a Gentoo user. I was uninstalling a package and wanted to remove all traces of it. So I got a list of what files "belong" to the package via a tool called equery. I then took the contents of the file and fed it to rm. After it took a while to complete, I checked the file list, something I should've done earlier.

It had started to delete the entirety of /etc and /usr. Fortunately my /home was untouched, and I could get all my data back. Also fortunately it was my desktop. Installing Gentoo takes forever though.

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It was a long time ago, so I forget the details. I was on Solaris. The disks on Solaris were partitioned in such a way that one of the partitions represented the whole disk (partition c? I forget). Anyway, one day, somehow I managed to forget this important piece of information, and poking around on a system, I was thinking, hey, what's this huge partition that's not mounted or anything? Hey, I should make a filesystem on it, no sense having disk space go to waste. Uh, hmm... the system seems to be getting a bit sluggish, what's going on... realization of what I've just done dawns... "oh, crap."

A coworker once came by, "you'll never believe what I almost did! I was adding a disk to the system and was about to create a filesystem, and I almost ran newfs on the wrong disk!". "Whew!" He heads back to his office, where he had left the mistyped command, sitting there, waiting for him to backspace over it, or type ctrl-U, and so he sits down and his chair and uh, he hits "enter" a couple of times. Oops.

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In college for a final project, I did

rm * ~

the day before my project was due. I spent the whole night re-writing the code. The funny thing is, I think the code turned out better than what was deleted. This is exactly why they should have used source control for assignments! Or I should have been using it myself :)

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I never did learn what the problem was, but...

After I moved out of the Ethernet-equipped dormrooms and had to resort to 28.8 kbit/s dialup (approximately 1997), I stumbled upon a 20 MB porn MPEG file I really wanted to see but the dialup connection kept getting severed about half-way through. So I logged into the Unix machine and attempted to download with Lynx into /tmp/something-innocuous (user accounts had a 5 MB limit). And somehow it crashed the machine (Solaris 2.1 IIRC), and I had visit a great many tiny offices before meeting the Dean of Academic Affairs or something to plead for getting my account back.

I later learned from PKDick's The Man in the High Castle, that Missouri is not in fact part of America. It is under the control of Nazi Germany.

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root: rm /dev/null

It really did remove it!

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don't make up stories out of whole cloth. you only need reboot your system to fix up it. –  gekannt Feb 26 '12 at 13:22
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