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I am making a simple console game in C++

I would like to know if I can access members from the 'entPlayer' class while using a pointer that is pointing to the base class ( 'Entity' ):

class Entity {
public:
    void setId(int id) { Id = id; }
    int getId() { return Id; }
protected:
    int Id;
};

class entPlayer : public Entity {
    string Name;
public:
    void setName(string name) { Name = name; }
    string getName() { return Name; }
};

Entity *createEntity(string Type) {
    Entity *Ent = NULL;
    if (Type == "player") {
        Ent = new entPlayer;
    }
    return Ent;
}

void main() {
    Entity *ply = createEntity("player");
    ply->setName("Test");
    ply->setId(1);

    cout << ply->getName() << endl;
    cout << ply->getId() << endl;

    delete ply;
}

How would I be able to call ply->setName etc?

OR

If it's not possible that way, what would be a better way?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, I had to edit your code formatting. The blank lines made your code really tall! Another little comment about your code: stick with a consistent naming convention e.g. AllClassNamesLikeThis, and parameter_names_like_this. Another nit: you'll kick yourself in the butt later with abbreviations like "ent". I honestly cannot tell what an entPlayer is supposed to be. I think what you mean is just "Player", or if you're feeling verbose "PlayerEntity". –  allyourcode Aug 1 '12 at 23:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It is possible by using a cast. If you know for a fact that the base class pointer points to an object of the derived class, you can use static_cast:

Entity* e = /* a pointer to an entPlayer object */;
entPlayer* p = static_cast<entPlayer*>(e);
p->setName("Test");

If you don't know for sure, then you need to use dynamic_cast and test the result to see that it is not null. Note that you can only use dynamic_cast if the base class has at least one virtual function. An example:

Entity* e = /* a pointer to some entity */;
entPlayer* p = dynamic_cast<entPlayer*>(e);
if (p)
{
    p->setName("Test");
}

That said, it would be far better to encapsulate your class's functionality using polymorphism (i.e. virtual functions).

Speaking of virtual functions, your class hierarchy as implement has undefined behavior: you can only delete an object of a derived type through a pointer to one of its base classes if the base class as a virtual destructor. So, you need to add a virtual destructor to the base class.

share|improve this answer
    
I had a related question, which this answer answers :D What I wanted to know was "How can I tell whether my base pointer actually points to a derived object?". The answer that I'm gleaning is use dynamic_cast (only works if the base class has a virtual function). Then, see if the result is NULL. #victorybaby –  allyourcode Aug 1 '12 at 23:02
    
This also (partially) answers another question that I've had for a while about C++: What is the difference between the various types of casts? There sure seems to be a good number of them! –  allyourcode Aug 1 '12 at 23:24

You can do a dynamic cast:

entPlayer * pPlayer = dynamic_cast<entPlayer *>(pointer_to_base);

This will (if successful) result in a derived pointer.

Otherwise NULL is returned.

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I would consider doing something like this:

public:
void setId(int id) 
{

    Id = id;

}

void virtual setName( string name ) = 0; // Virtual Function 
string virtual getName() = 0; // Virtual Function

int getId() { return Id; }

protected:
    int Id;

};

class entPlayer : public Entity {

    string Name;

public:
    entPlayer() {

        Name = "";
        Id = 0;

    }

    void entPlayer::setName(string name) {  // Must define function

        Name = name;
}

string entPlayer::getName() { return Name; } // again must define function here

};
share|improve this answer

C++ makes what you are trying to do really awkward, because this is probably not what you should be doing, and it is trying to lead you to good object-oriented design. In fact, by default, compilers often disable run-time type information (RTTI), which is needed to make dynamic_cast work.

Without knowing your broader context, it's hard to say what you should do instead. What I can say is that if you wanted a more specific pointer, you should have put a ring on it you almost certainly shouldn't use a function that returns an Entity*, and there is probably a better approach.

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Either declare setName as virtual (pure or implement) at parent, or use static_cast to access child thru parent pointer (and you have to be sure that the actual object behind the pointer is of child type).

Time to learn C++. ;-)

I would...

class Entity {

public: void setId(int id) {

    Id = id;

}

int getId() { return Id; }

virtual void setName(string name) {} // learn what "pure" is, now it is implemented

protected: int Id;

};

reinterpret_cast is not always an option and ... read details what it does...

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