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Is it possible to have an ASP.NET MVC route that uses subdomain information to determine its route? For example:

  • user1.domain.com goes to one place
  • user2.domain.com goes to another?

Or, can I make it so both of these go to the same controller/action with a username parameter?

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I implemented a similar sort of thing for multi-tenanted applications, but using an abstract base Controller rather than a custom Route class. My blog post on it is here. –  Luke Sampson Jul 6 '09 at 6:26
5  
Be sure to consider this approach: [blog.tonywilliams.me.uk/… I found it to be better for introducing multitenancy to my app than the other answers, because MVC areas are a nice way to introduce tenant-specific controllers and views in an organized way. –  trebormf May 16 '11 at 19:55
2  
@trebormf - I think you should add it as an answer, this is what I ended up using as the basis for my solution. –  Shagglez Sep 14 '12 at 13:48
    
@Shagglez - Thanks. It was an answer, but a moderator converted it to a comment for reasons I cannot understand. –  trebormf Sep 18 '12 at 15:19
4  
Tony's like was broken. Here's one that worked for me: blog.tonywilliams.me.uk/… –  Ronnie Overby Nov 7 '12 at 15:57
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5 Answers

up vote 124 down vote accepted

You can do it by creating a new route and adding it to the routes collection in RegisterRoutes in your global.asax. Below is a very simple example of a custom Route:

public class ExampleRoute : RouteBase
{

    public override RouteData GetRouteData(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var url = httpContext.Request.Headers["HOST"];
        var index = url.IndexOf(".");

        if (index < 0)
            return null;

        var subDomain = url.Substring(0, index);

        if (subDomain == "user1")
        {
            var routeData = new RouteData(this, new MvcRouteHandler());
            routeData.Values.Add("controller", "User1"); //Goes to the User1Controller class
            routeData.Values.Add("action", "Index"); //Goes to the Index action on the User1Controller

            return routeData;
        }

        if (subDomain == "user2")
        {
            var routeData = new RouteData(this, new MvcRouteHandler());
            routeData.Values.Add("controller", "User2"); //Goes to the User2Controller class
            routeData.Values.Add("action", "Index"); //Goes to the Index action on the User2Controller

            return routeData;
        }

        return null;
    }

    public override VirtualPathData GetVirtualPath(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary values)
    {
        //Implement your formating Url formating here
        return null;
    }
}
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1  
Thanks for the detailed sample but I'm not following how to execute the .Add from Global.asax. –  justSteve Jan 4 '12 at 17:25
4  
I called the route SubdomainRoute and added it as the first route like this: routes.Add(new SubdomainRoute()); –  Jeff Handley Feb 1 '12 at 9:58
4  
Does this approach requires hard-coding a list of possible sub-domains? –  Maxim V. Pavlov Mar 31 '12 at 8:15
1  
No, you can add a database field called something like "subdomain" that you will be what you're expecting the subdomain to be for a particular user, or whatever else, then just do a lookup on the subdomain. –  Ryan Hayes Nov 25 '12 at 23:50
    
Could anybody recommend a webforms version of this? –  MatthewT Mar 1 at 1:44
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This is not my work, but I had to add it on this answer.

Here is a great solution to this problem. Maartin Balliauw wrote code that creates a DomainRoute class that can be used very similarly to the normal routing.

http://blog.maartenballiauw.be/post/2009/05/20/ASPNET-MVC-Domain-Routing.aspx

Sample use would be like this...

routes.Add("DomainRoute", new DomainRoute( 
    "{customer}.example.com", // Domain with parameters 
    "{action}/{id}",    // URL with parameters 
    new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }  // Parameter defaults 
))

;

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5  
There is a problem with this solution. Say, you want to handle subdomains as different users: routes.Add("SD", new DomainRoute("user}.localhost", "", new { controller = "Home", action = "IndexForUser", user="u1" } )); It caches the homepage as well. This is because of the regex that's generated. In order to fix this, you can make a copy of the CreateRegex method in DomainRoute.cs, name it CreateDomainRegex, change the * on this line to +: source = source.Replace("}", @">([a-zA-Z0-9_]*))"); and use this new method for domain regx in GetRouteData method: domainRegex = CreateDomainRegex(Domain); –  Gorkem Pacaci Jun 28 '10 at 20:12
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To capture the subdomain while retaining the standard MVC5 routing features, use the following SubdomainRoute class derived from Route.

Additionally, SubdomainRoute allows the subdomain optionally to be specified as a query parameter, making sub.example.com/foo/bar and example.com/foo/bar?subdomain=sub equivalent. This allows you to test before the DNS subdomains are configured. The query parameter (when in use) is propagated through new links generated by Url.Action, etc.

The query parameter also enables local debugging with Visual Studio 2013 without having to configure with netsh or run as Administrator. By default, IIS Express only binds to localhost when non-elevated; it won't bind to synonymous hostnames like sub.localtest.me.

class SubdomainRoute : Route
{
    public SubdomainRoute(string url) : base(url, new MvcRouteHandler()) {}

    public override RouteData GetRouteData(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        var routeData = base.GetRouteData(httpContext);
        if (routeData == null) return null; // Only look at the subdomain if this route matches in the first place.
        string subdomain = httpContext.Request.Params["subdomain"]; // A subdomain specified as a query parameter takes precedence over the hostname.
        if (subdomain == null) {
            string host = httpContext.Request.Headers["Host"];
            int index = host.IndexOf('.');
            if (index >= 0)
                subdomain = host.Substring(0, index);
        }
        if (subdomain != null)
            routeData.Values["subdomain"] = subdomain;
        return routeData;
    }

    public override VirtualPathData GetVirtualPath(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary values)
    {
        object subdomainParam = requestContext.HttpContext.Request.Params["subdomain"];
        if (subdomainParam != null)
            values["subdomain"] = subdomainParam;
        return base.GetVirtualPath(requestContext, values);
    }
}

For convenience, call the following MapSubdomainRoute method from your RegisterRoutes method just as you would plain old MapRoute:

static void MapSubdomainRoute(this RouteCollection routes, string name, string url, object defaults = null, object constraints = null)
{
    routes.Add(name, new SubdomainRoute(url) {
        Defaults = new RouteValueDictionary(defaults),
        Constraints = new RouteValueDictionary(constraints),
        DataTokens = new RouteValueDictionary()
    });
}

Finally, to conveniently access the subdomain (either from a true subdomain or a query parameter), it is helpful to create a Controller base class with this Subdomain property:

protected string Subdomain
{
    get { return (string)Request.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["subdomain"]; }
}
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1  
I updated the code to make the subdomain always available as a route value. This simplifies access to the subdomain. –  Edward Brey Nov 3 '13 at 3:32
    
I like this. Very simple, and more than enough for my project. –  SoonDead Feb 25 at 14:22
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Yes but you have to create your own route handler.

Typically the route is not aware of the domain because the application could be deployed to any domain and the route would not care one way or another. But in your case you want to base the controller and action off the domain, so you will have to create a custom route that is aware of the domain.

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To capture the subdomain when using Web API, override the Action Selector to inject a subdomain query parameter. Then use the subdomain query parameter in your controllers' actions like this:

public string Get(string id, string subdomain)

This approach makes debugging convenient since you can specify the query parameter by hand when using localhost instead of the actual host name (see the standard MVC5 routing answer for details). This is the code for Action Selector:

class SubdomainActionSelector : IHttpActionSelector
{
    private readonly IHttpActionSelector defaultSelector;

    public SubdomainActionSelector(IHttpActionSelector defaultSelector)
    {
        this.defaultSelector = defaultSelector;
    }

    public ILookup<string, HttpActionDescriptor> GetActionMapping(HttpControllerDescriptor controllerDescriptor)
    {
        return defaultSelector.GetActionMapping(controllerDescriptor);
    }

    public HttpActionDescriptor SelectAction(HttpControllerContext controllerContext)
    {
        var routeValues = controllerContext.Request.GetRouteData().Values;
        if (!routeValues.ContainsKey("subdomain")) {
            string host = controllerContext.Request.Headers.Host;
            int index = host.IndexOf('.');
            if (index >= 0)
                controllerContext.Request.GetRouteData().Values.Add("subdomain", host.Substring(0, index));
        }
        return defaultSelector.SelectAction(controllerContext);
    }
}

Replace the default Action Selector by adding this to WebApiConfig.Register:

config.Services.Replace(typeof(IHttpActionSelector), new SubdomainActionSelector(config.Services.GetActionSelector()));
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