Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this script I have problems with file-name-extensions: if I use /home/mm/test_x it works, with file named /home/mm/test_x.csv it doesn't:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings; use strict;
use 5.012;
use DBI;

my $table_1 = '/home/mm/test_1.csv';
my $table_2 = '/home/mm/test_2.csv';
#$table_1 = '/home/mm/test_1';
#$table_2 = '/home/mm/test_2';

my $dbh = DBI->connect( "DBI:CSV:" );
$dbh->{RaiseError} = 1;

$table_1 = $dbh->quote_identifier( $table_1 );
$table_2 = $dbh->quote_identifier( $table_2 );

my $sth = $dbh->prepare( "SELECT a.id, a.name, b.city FROM $table_1 AS a NATURAL JOIN $table_2 AS b" );

$sth->execute;
$sth->dump_results;
$dbh->disconnect;

Output with file-name-extention:

DBD::CSV::st execute failed:
Execution ERROR: No such column '"/home/mm/test_1.csv".id' called from /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/5.12.0/x86_64-linux/DBD/File.pm at 570.

Output without file-name-extension:

'1', 'Brown', 'Laramie'
'2', 'Smith', 'Watertown'
2 rows

Is this a bug?

cat test_1.csv

id,name
1,Brown
2,Smith
5,Green

cat test_2.csv

id,city
1,Laramie
2,Watertown
8,Springville

share|improve this question
    
Can you also give sample data in csv files. –  Space May 7 '10 at 7:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

DBD::CSV provides a way to map the table names you use in your queries to filenames. The same mechanism is used to set up per-file attributes like line ending, field separator etc. look for 'csv_tables' in the DBD::CSV documentation.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use warnings;
use strict;

use DBI;

my $dbh = DBI->connect("DBI:CSV:f_dir=/home/mm", { RaiseError => 1 });
$dbh->{csv_tables}->{table_1} = {
    'file' => 'test_1.csv',
    'eol' => "\n",
};
$dbh->{csv_tables}->{table_2} = {
    'file' => 'test_2.csv',
    'eol' => "\n",
};

my $sth = $dbh->prepare( "SELECT a.id, a.name, b.city FROM table_1 AS a NATURAL JOIN table_2 AS b" );

$sth->execute();
$sth->dump_results();
$dbh->disconnect();

In my case I had to specify a line ending character, because I created the CSV files in vi so they ended up with Unix line endings whereas DBD::CSV assumes DOS/Windows line-endings regardless of the platform the script is run on.

share|improve this answer

I looks like even this works:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use warnings; use strict;
use 5.012;
use DBI;

my $dbh = DBI->connect("DBI:CSV:f_dir=/home/mm/Dokumente", undef, undef, { RaiseError => 1, });

my $table = 'new.csv';
$dbh->do( "DROP TABLE IF EXISTS $table" );
$dbh->do( "CREATE TABLE $table ( id INT, name CHAR(64), city CHAR(64) )" );
my $sth_new = $dbh->prepare( "INSERT INTO $table( id, name, city ) VALUES ( ?, ?, ? )" );

$dbh->{csv_tables}->{table_1} = { 'file' => '/tmp/test_1.csv', 'eol' => "\n", };
$dbh->{csv_tables}->{table_2} = { 'file' => '/tmp/test_2.csv', 'eol' => "\n", };
my $sth_old = $dbh->prepare( "SELECT a.id, a.name, b.city FROM table_1 AS a NATURAL JOIN table_2 AS b" );
$sth_old->execute();

while ( my $hash_ref = $sth_old->fetchrow_hashref() ) {
    state $count = 1;
    $sth_new->execute( $count++, $hash_ref->{'a.name'}, $hash_ref->{'b.city'} );
}
$dbh->disconnect();
share|improve this answer

I think you might want to take a look at the f_ext and f_dir attributes. You can then class your table names as "test_1" and "test_2" without the csv but the files used will be test_1.csv and test_2.csv. The problem with a dot in the table name is a dot is usually used for separating the schema from the table name (see f_schema).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.