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Essentially I have to use a poorly implemented web service maintained by other programmers. They have two classes that don't derive from a parent class, but have the same properties (Ughh...). So it looks like this in my web service proxy class file:

public partial class Product1
{
    public int Quantity;
    public int Price;
}

public partial class Product2
{
    public int Quantity;
    public int Price;
}

So what's the best way to grab the values from known properties without duplicating the code? I know I probably could use reflection, but that can get ugly. If there is an easier less crazier way to do it (maybe in the new c# features?) please let me know.

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Can you change the classes at all? –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 7 '10 at 8:44
    
Can you add code to the Product classes? –  tzaman May 7 '10 at 8:44
    
I probably could since what I'm doing is creating a proxy class from the web service and using that, but that can get hard to maintain like if they update the webservice and I recreate the proxy class I'd have to remember the change I made and make it every time. –  SlipToFall May 7 '10 at 8:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure I fully understand your situation, but maybe something like this? Define an IProduct interface with getQuantity and getPrice methods, and implement it in both classes:

public partial class Product1 : IProduct
{
  public int Quantity;
  public int Price;
  public int getQuantity() { return Quantity; }
  public int getPrice() { return Price; }
}

And similarly for the other one; then just use them both as IProduct.

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Sorry I realized I didn't make it clear and changed the question accordingly. It's a web service I don't have control over, but have to use. Otherwise I would have used inheritance like a good programmer or better yet not have two separate classes with the same properties. –  SlipToFall May 7 '10 at 9:04
    
Never mind I see what your saying. The fact that it's a partial class helps because I can modify the class within my own code without editing the proxy file, completely glossed over that. Thanks. –  SlipToFall May 7 '10 at 10:03

If the classes are generated from a web proxy, then you could implement a partial class that implemented a common interface.

From Proxy Gen:

public partial class Product1 {
    public int Quantity;
    public int Price;
}

public partial class Product2 {
    public int Quantity;
    public int Price;
}

Hand written:

public interface IProduct {
    int Quantity { get; }
    int Price { get; }
}

public partial class Product1:IProduct {
    int IProduct.Quantity { get { return Quantity; } }
    int IProduct.Price { get { return Price; } }
}

public partial class Product2:IProduct {
    int IProduct.Quantity { get { return Quantity; } }
    int IProduct.Price { get { return Price; } }
}

Now both your classes implement IProduct and can be passed around the same way.

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Dynamic keyword in 4.0? but I wouldn't say it's elegant, but it will work.

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1  
While it might work, it should not be used as a crutch for bad design, though if that's the only solution left then I would say that it is a notch better than reflection. –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 7 '10 at 8:45
    
Yes I totally agree with you on that, that's why I said it's not elegant. –  BartoszAdamczewski May 7 '10 at 8:47
    
My whole job is dealing with bad design. It's really frustrating, so I'm not sure what else I can do. I probably could tell the people to change it, but that's a whole other can of worms. I'm pretty sure this would be the only time I'd have to use it. –  SlipToFall May 7 '10 at 8:51

here is some pseudocode sorry for don't working it out. Maybe this gives you the right direction:

List objects = new List(); objects.Add(p1);//your first product object objects.Add(p2);//your second product object

    foreach (var o in objects)//go through all projects
    {

        if (o.GetType().Equals(typeof(Product1)) //check which class is behind the object
            ((Product1)o).Price = 2; //convert to fitting class and call your property
        //....
    }
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not nice but should work –  MUG4N May 7 '10 at 8:55

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